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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2002. Studying Classroom Teaching as a Medium for Professional Development: Proceedings of a U.S.-Japan Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10289.
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Page137
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2002. Studying Classroom Teaching as a Medium for Professional Development: Proceedings of a U.S.-Japan Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10289.
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Page138
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2002. Studying Classroom Teaching as a Medium for Professional Development: Proceedings of a U.S.-Japan Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10289.
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Page139
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2002. Studying Classroom Teaching as a Medium for Professional Development: Proceedings of a U.S.-Japan Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10289.
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Page140
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2002. Studying Classroom Teaching as a Medium for Professional Development: Proceedings of a U.S.-Japan Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10289.
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Page141
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2002. Studying Classroom Teaching as a Medium for Professional Development: Proceedings of a U.S.-Japan Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10289.
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Page142
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Research Council. 2002. Studying Classroom Teaching as a Medium for Professional Development: Proceedings of a U.S.-Japan Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10289.
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Page143

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Appendixes Appendix A: Workshop Agenda Appendix B: Participant List Appendix C: Steering Committee Biographical Information Appendix D: A Plan for the Lesson on Division by a Two-Digit Number Appendix E: A Demonstration Lesson: Function Thinking at Sixth Grade Appendix F: A Study Lesson: Large Numbers at Fourth Grade Appendix G: Records of Instruction: Reasoning About Three Coins et third Grade Appendix H: Transcript of Excerpts from Small Group Discussions Appendix I: A Written Case: Pattern Trains at Sixth Grade Appendix I: To Become a Mathematics Teacher Appendix K: Glossary Appendix L: Workshop Reading List Appendix M: References

.r~ A The Stucly of Teaching Practice as a Meclium for Professional Development U.S. - Japan Teacher Preparation Workshop Makuhari, Japan August 6-8, 2000 Sunclay, August 6 4:00-5:00 p.m. Registration and Informal Reception 5:00-5:15 p.m. Welcome and Overview Hiroshi Fujita, Tokai University Hyman Bass, University of Michigan Fargo Ishigaki, Waseda University 5:15-7:15 p.m. Background Context for Teacher Preparation in the United States and in Japan Moderator: Daniel Goroff, Harvard University Elementary Mathematics Education in the United States Deborah Schifter, Education Development Center Secondary Mathematics Education in the United States Zalman ~ Usiskin, University of Chicago A Study of Teacher Change Through Inserv~ce Mathematics Education Programs in Graduate School Keiichi Shigematsu, Nara University of Education Keiko Hino, Nara University of Education

Recurrent Education in Japan Mamoru Takezawa, Kanagawa Prefectural Education Center Toru Handa, Waseda University Honjo Senior High School 7:15-~:30 p.m. Reception Presider: Hyman Bass, University of Michigan Remarks: Lee ~ Stiff, North Carolina State University Yoshishige Sugiyama, Waseda University Monclay, August 7 Lesson Stucly as Professional Development 9:00-10:00 a.m. Introduction to the Focus of the workshop Presider: Toshiakira Fujii, Tokyo Gak~gei University Setting the Stage · What can be learned from using practice as a means of developing teachers' knowledge of mathematical content and how to teach that mathematics? · What questions should frame our thinking? Deborah Loewenherg Ball, University of Michigan What Is Lesson Study? · How does lesson study work and what is its role in developing teachers' content knowledge and understanding of how to teach? Yoshinori Shimiz~, Tokyo Gak~gei University 10:00-~:00 a.m. Consideration of Lesson Study Framing Lesson Study for U.S. Participants Makoto Yoshida, Columbia University-Teachers College Japanese Study Group Fourth-Grade Lesson and Rationale Hiroshi Nakano, Tokyo Gak~gei University Elementary School Il:00-~:15 a.m. Break Il:15 a.m.- 12:30 p.m. 12:30-~:30 p.m. Fourth-Grade Lesson Observation Video of Fourth-Grade Lesson on Large Numbers Lunch A P P E N D I X A

1:30-2:30 p.m. Group Discussion of Fourth-Grade Lesson Facilitator: Akihiko Takahashi, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign · What was the role of lesson study in enabling the teachers to learn how to teach the lesson? · What observations about the lesson seem important? · What potential adjustments might be made in the design of the lesson? 2:30-3:15 p.m. Video of Study Group Discussion of Sixth-Grade Lesson 3:15-3:30 p.m. Break 3:30-4:30 p.m. Small Group Discussion: Objectives and Effectiveness of Lesson Study Groups as a Resource for Professional Development · What are the advantages of using lesson study and lesson study groups as a resource for professional development for teachers? · What are the limitations? · Does this approach raise any research issues that should be co nsi(l ere (l ? · How does this approach address issues of teacher content knowledge? · How does this process create effective teachers in relation to content knowle(lge, pedagogy, and the role for research in continuing the discussion? 4:30-5:30 p.m. Reflections on the Two Lessons: Fourth and Sixth Grade · How do the two lessons compare? · What are the (lifferences and the similarities? · What was the mathematical content and how did the lessons develop student understanding? Moderator: Keiichi Shigematsu, Nara University of Education Panelists: Jacqueline Goodioe, Burrville Elementary School ferry Becker, Southern Illinois University ·chiei Hirahayashi, Horoshima University Keiichi Shigematsu, Nara University of Education 5:30 p.m. Homework A P P E N D I X A

Tuesday, August 8 Professional Development Through the Use of RecorcIs of Practice 9:00-10:30 a.m. Professional Development Through Records of Instruction · How do observations of what teachers do in the act of teaching enable teachers to learn mathematics? · How do such observations enable teachers to learn how to teach the mathematics they need to teach? Presider: Zalman ~ Usiskin, University of Chicago Dehorah Loewenherg Ball, University of Michigan Hyman Bass, University of Michigan 10:30-10:45 a.m. Break 10:45 a.m.- Professional Development Through Written Cases 12:00 p.m. · How can cases designed to investigate teaching and learning be a site for learning about teaching? · What does it mean for teachers to use the study of others' practice to learn mathematics and about teaching mathematics? Presider: Judith Mumme, Program Director, Mathematics Renaissance Margaret Smith, University of Pittsburgh 12:00-~:00 p.m. Lunch 1:00-2:00 p.m. Small Group Discussion: Professional Development Through Records of Practice · What are the advantages and disadvantages of each approach to delivering professional development? 2:00-3:00 p.m. Panel: Mathematical Knowledge of Teachers · What are the mathematical resources that teachers need to teach well? · How can teachers learn the mathematics they need to teach well? Moderator: Dehorah Loewenherg Ball, University of Michigan Panelists: Dehorah Schifter, Education Development Center , Fargo Ishigaki, Waseda University Miho Ueno, Tokyo Gak~gei University Senior High School Oiz~mi Campus Zalman ~ Usiskin, University of Chicago A P P E N D I X A

3:00-4:00 p.m. Reflections on Relation to Professional Development Small Group Discussion · Based on the workshop and on the nature of professional development, what offers promise and why? · What does not offer promise and why not? · What areas call for further research and what are possible strategies to use in framing that research? 4:00- 4:30 p.m. Conclusions Deborah Loewenherg Ball, University of Michigan Toshiakira Fujii, Tokyo Gak~gei University Closing Remarks Hyman Bass, University of Michigan Marco Ishigaki, Waseda University The U.S.- Japan Teacher Preparation Workshop is sponsored by the National Science Foundation, The Spencer Foundation, and the MCT WorIdCom Foundation. A P P E N D I X A

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The Mathematical Sciences Education Board (MSEB) and the U.S. National Commission on Mathematics Instruction (USNCMI) took advantage of a unique opportunity to bring educators together. In August 2000, following the Ninth International Congress on Mathematics Education (ICME-9) in Makuhari, Japan, MSEB and USNCMI capitalized on the presence of mathematics educators in attendance from the United States and Japan by holding a two and a half--day workshop on the professional development of mathematics teachers. This workshop used the expertise of the participants from the two countries to develop a better, more flexible, and more useful understanding of the knowledge that is needed to teach well and how to help teachers to obtain this knowledge. A major focus of the workshop was to discuss teachers’ opportunities in both societies -- using teaching practice as a medium for professional development. Another focus of the workshop addressed practice by considering the records of teaching, including videos of classroom lessons and cases describing teachers and their work. These proceedings reflect the activities and discussion of the workshop using both print and video to enable others to share in their experience

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