National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Appendix A Biological Threats and Terrorism: How Prepared Are We? Assessing the Science and Our Response Capabilities
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Information Resources." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×
Page225
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Information Resources." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×
Page226
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Information Resources." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×
Page227
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Information Resources." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×
Page228
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Information Resources." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×
Page229
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Information Resources." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×
Page230
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Information Resources." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×
Page231
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Information Resources." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×
Page232
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Information Resources." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×
Page233
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Information Resources." Institute of Medicine. 2002. Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10290.
×
Page234

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Appendix B Information Resources PUBLISHED LITERATURE Overview Carus WS. 2001. The Illicit Use of Biological Agents since 1990. Working Pa- per: Bioterrorism and Biocrimes. Center for Counterproliferation Research. Washington, DC: National Defense University. Christopher GW, Cieslak TJ, Pavlin JA, Eitzen EM Jr. 1997. Biological warfare. A historical perspective. JAMA 278(5):412–417. Available at: http://jama.ama-assn.org/issues/v278n5/ffull/jsc7044.html. Fauci AS. 2001. Infectious diseases: Considerations for the 21st century. Clini- cal Infectious Diseases 32(5):675–685. Available at: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/CID/journal/contents/v32n5.html. Franz DR, Zajtchuk R. 2000. Biological terrorism: Understanding the threat, preparation, and medical response. Disease-a-Month 46(2):125–190. Hamburg MA. 2000. Bioterrorism: A challenge to public health and medicine. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice 6(4):38–44. Hawley RJ, Eitzen EM. 2001. Biological weapons: A primer for microbiolo- gists. Annual Review of Microbiology 55:235–253. Available at: http://micro.annualreviews.org/cgi/content/full/55/1/235. Henderson DA. Bioterrorism. International Journal of Clinical Practice Supple- ment 115:32–36. Kortepeter MG, Cieslak TJ, Eitzen EM. 2001. Bioterrorism. Journal of Envi- ronmental Health 63(6):21–24. Lane HC, Fauci AS. 2001. Bioterrorism on the home front: A new challenge for American medicine. JAMA 286(20):2595–2597. Available at: http://jama.ama-assn.org/issues/v286n20/fpdf/jed10079.pdf. 225

226 BIOLOGICAL THREATS AND TERRORISM Anthrax Bradley KA, Mogridge J, Mourez M, Collier RJ, Young JA. 2001. Identification of the cellular receptor for anthrax toxin. Nature 414(6860):225–229. Available at: http://www.nature.com/nature/anthrax/. Inglesby TV, Henderson DA, Bartlett JG, Ascher MS, Eitzen E, Friedlander AM, Hauer J, McDade J, Osterholm MT, O’Toole T, Parker G, Perl TM, Russell PK, Tonat K. Working Group on Civilian Biodefense. 1999. An- thrax as a biological weapon: Medical and public health management. JAMA 281(18):1735–1745. Available at: http://jama.ama- assn.org/issues/v281n18/ffull/jst80027.html. Pannifer AD, Wong TY, Schwarzenbacher R, Renatus M, Petosa C, Bienk- owska J, Lacy DB, Collier RJ, Park S, Leppla SH, Hanna P, Liddington RC. 2001. Crystal structure of the anthrax lethal factor. Nature 414(6860):229–233. Available at: http://www.nature.com/nature/anthrax/. Pearson, H. October 24, 2001. Anthrax action shapes up. Nature. Online. Avail- able at: www.nature.com/nsu/011025/011025-9.html. Accessed October 26, 2001. Smallpox Cohen J. 2001. Bioterrorism. Smallpox vaccinations: How much protection re- mains? Science 294(5544):985. Available at: http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/294/5544/985. Henderson DA, Inglesby TV, Bartlett JG, Ascher MS, Eitzen E, Jahrling PB, Hauer J, Layton M, McDade J, Osterholm MT, O’Toole T, Parker G, Perl T, Russell PK, Tonat K. Working Group on Civilian Biodefense. 1999. Smallpox as a biological weapon: Medical and public health management. JAMA 281(22):2127–2137. Available at: http://jama.ama- assn.org/issues/v281n22/ffull/jst90000.html. Other Dangerous Pathogens Arnon SS, Schechter R, Inglesby TV, Henderson DA, Bartlett JG, Ascher MS, Eitzen E, Fine AD, Hauer J, Layton M, Lillibridge S, Osterholm MT, O’Toole T, Parker G, Perl TM, Russell PK, Swerdlow DL, Tonat K. Working Group on Civilian Biodefense. 2001. Botulinum toxin as a bio- logical weapon: Medical and public health management. JAMA 285(8):1059–1070. Available at: http://jama.ama- assn.org/issues/v285n8/ffull/jst00017.html. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2001. National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals. Atlanta: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/dls/report/PDF/CompleteReport.pdf. Dennis DT, Inglesby TV, Henderson DA, Bartlett JG, Ascher MS, Eitzen E, Fine AD, Friedlander AM, Hauer J, Layton M, Lillibridge SR, McDade JE, Osterholm MT, O’Toole T, Parker G, Perl TM, Russell PK, Tonat K. Working Group on Civilian Biodefense. 2001. Tularemia as a biological weapon: Medical and public health management. JAMA 285(21):2763–2773. Available at: http://jama.ama- assn.org/issues/v285n21/ffull/jst10001.html.

APPENDIX B: INFORMATION RESOURCES 227 Inglesby TV, Dennis DT, Henderson DA, Bartlett JG, Ascher MS, Eitzen E, Fine AD, Friedlander AM, Hauer J, Koerner JF, Layton M, McDade J, Os- terholm MT, O’Toole T, Parker G, Perl TM, Russell PK, Schoch-Spana M, Tonat K. Working Group on Civilian Biodefense. 2000. Plague as a bio- logical weapon: Medical and public health management. JAMA 283(17):2281–2290. Available at: http://jama.ama- assn.org/issues/v283n17/ffull/jst90013.html. Vaccines Cohen J, Marshall E. 2001. Bioterrorism: Vaccines for biodefense: A system in distress. Science 294(5542):498–501. Available at: http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/294/5542/498. National Vaccine Advisory Committee. 1997. United States vaccine research: A delicate fabric of public and private collaboration. Pediatrics 100(6):1015–1020. Available at: http://www.pediatrics.org/cgi/content/full/100/6/1015. Russell PK. 1999. Vaccines in civilian defense against bioterrorism. Emerging Infectious Diseases 5(4):531–533. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol5no4/russell.htm. U.S. Department of Defense. July 2001. Report on Biological Warfare Defense Vaccine Research and Development Programs. Available at: http://www.defenselink.mil/pubs/ReportonBiologicalWarfareDefenseVacci neRDPrgras- July2001.pdf. Vandersmissen W. 1992. Availability of quality vaccines: The industrial point of view. Vaccine 10(13):955–957. Widdus R. 2001. Public-private partnerships for health: Their main targets, their diversity, and their future directions. Bulletin of the World Health Organi- zation 79(8):713–720. Available at: http://www.who.int/bulletin/pdf/2001/issue8/vol79.no.8.713-720.pdf. Antimicrobials Barrett, A. November 5, 2001. How to get pharma’s big guns aimed at microbes. Business Week, pp. 40–41. Cassell GH, Mekalanos J. 2001. Development of antimicrobial agents in the era of new and reemerging infectious diseases and increasing antibiotic resis- tance. JAMA 285(5):601–605. Available at: http://jama.ama- assn.org/issues/v285n5/ffull/jsc00411.html. Wheeler C, Berkley S. 2001. Initial lessons from public-private partnerships in drug and vaccine development. Bulletin of the World Health Organization 79(8):728–734. Available at: http://www.who.int/bulletin/pdf/2001/issue8/vol79.no.8.728-734.pdf. Emerging Discovery and Technologies Dubensky TW Jr, Liu MA, Ulmer JB. 2000. Delivery systems for gene-based vaccines. Molecular Medicine 6(9):723–732. Gu ML, Leppla SH, Klinman DM. 1999. Protection against anthrax toxin by vaccination with a DNA plasmid encoding anthrax protective antigen. Vac- cine 17(4):340–344.

228 BIOLOGICAL THREATS AND TERRORISM Klinman DM, Verthelyi D, Takeshita F, Ishii KJ. 1999. Immune recognition of foreign DNA: A cure for bioterrorism? Immunity 11(2):123–129. Liu MA, McClements W, Ulmer JB, Shiver J, Donnelly J. 1997. Immunization of non-human primates with DNA vaccines. Vaccine 15(8):909–912. Mourez M, Kane RS, Mogridge J, Metallo S, Deschatelets P, Sellman BR, Whitesides GM, Collier RJ. 2001. Designing a polyvalent inhibitor of an- thrax toxin. Nature Biotechnology 19(10):958–961. Available at: http://www.nature.com/nature/anthrax/. Safety and Regulatory Challenges Kolata G. November 13, 2001. Bioterror drugs stall over rules and logistics. New York Times. Online. Available at: www.nytimes.com. Accessed No- vember 15, 2001. LEADER: When drugs can be too safe. November 7, 2001. Financial Times. Online. Available at: www.news.ft.com. Accessed November 15, 2001. Michaels A, Dyer G. November 7, 2001. U.S. may tighten guidelines on drug approvals. Financial Times. Online. Available at: www.news.ft.com. Ac- cessed November 8, 2001. Pollack A. November 13, 2001. Antibiotics business is again popular. New York Times. Online. Available at: www.nytimes.com. Accessed November 15, 2001. Smith HA, Klinman DM. 2001. The regulation of DNA vaccines. Current Opinion in Biotechnology 12(3):299–303. Zoon KC. 1999. Vaccines, pharmaceutical products, and bioterrorism: Chal- lenges for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Emerging Infectious Diseases 5(4):534–536. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/EID/vol5no4/zoon.htm. Proliferation of Dangerous Pathogens Breithaupt H. 2000. Toxins for terrorists. Do scientists act illegally when send- ing out potentially dangerous material? European Molecular Biology Orga- nization Reports 1(4):298–301. Available at: http://embo- reports.oupjournals.org/cgi/content/full/1/4/298?. Fraser CM, Dando MR. 2001. Genomics and future biological weapons: The need for preventive action by the biomedical community. Nature Genetics 29(3):253–256. Available at: http://www.nature.com/nature/anthrax/. Malakoff D, Enserink M. 2001. Bioterrorism. New law may force labs to screen workers. Science 294(5544):971–973. Available at: http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/294/5544/971. Tansey B, McCormick E. November 12, 2001. 22,000 U.S. labs handle deadly germs: Feinstein backs bill for government tracking system. San Francisco Chronicle. Online. Available at: www.sfgate.com. Accessed November 14, 2001. Zelicoff A. May 2001. Arms control today: An impractical protocol. Arms Con- trol Association. Online. Available at: www.armscontrol.org. Accessed October 30, 2001.

APPENDIX B: INFORMATION RESOURCES 229 Preparedness and Emergency Response Benjamin GC. 2001. Public health infrastructure: Creating a solid foundation. Physician Executive 27(2):86–87. Caruso JT. November 6, 2001. Bioterrorism. Statement of Deputy Assistant Director of the Counterterrorism Division of the Federal Bureau of Investi- gation to the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Technology, Terrorism and Government Information. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2001. The public health response to biological and chemical terrorism: Interim planning guidance for state public health officials. Atlanta: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Available at: http://www.bt.cdc.gov/Documents/Planning/PlanningGuidance.PDF. Fidler DP. 2001. The malevolent use of microbes and the rule of law: Legal challenges presented by bioterrorism. Clinical Infectious Diseases 33(5):686–689. Available at: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/CID/journal/contents/v33n5.html. Fine A, Layton M. 2001. Lessons from the West Nile viral encephalitis outbreak in New York City, 1999: Implications for bioterrorism preparedness. Clini- cal Infectious Diseases 32(2):277–282. Available at: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/CID/journal/contents/v32n2.html. Fraser MR, Fisher VS. 2001. Elements of effective bioterrorism preparedness: A planning primer for local public health agencies. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials. Available at: http://www.naccho.org/files/documents/Final_Effective_Bioterrism.pdf. Gallo RJ, Campbell D. 2000. Bioterrorism: Challenges and opportunities for local health departments. Journal of Public Health Management and Prac- tice 6(4):57–62. Heymann, D. September 5, 2001. Strengthening global preparedness for defense against infectious disease threats. Statement for the Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate. Hearing on the Threat of Bioterrorism and the Spread of Infectious Diseases. Available at: http://www.who.int/emc/pdfs/Senate_hearing.pdf. Hughes J. April 20, 1999. Statement of Director, National Center for Infectious Diseases to the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Technology, Terrorism and Government Information. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/biojud.htm. Illinois Department of Public Health. 2001. Surviving Disasters: A Citizen’s Emergency Handbook. Available at: http://www.idph.state.il.us/pdf/SurvivingDisasters.pdf. Inglesby T, Grossman R, O’Toole T. 2001. A plague on your city: Observations from TOPOFF. Clinical Infectious Diseases 32(3):436–445. Available at: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/CID/journal/contents/v32n3.html. Inglesby TV, O’Toole T, Henderson DA. 2000. Preventing the use of biological weapons: Improving response should prevention fail. Clinical Infectious Diseases 30(6):926–929. Available at: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/CID/journal/contents/v30n6.html. Keim M, Kaufmann AF. 1999. Principles for emergency response to bioter- rorism. Annals of Emergency Medicine 34(2):177–182. Khan AS, Ashford DA. 2001. Ready or not—Preparedness for bioterrorism. New England Journal of Medicine 345(4):287–289. Available at: http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/full/345/4/287.

230 BIOLOGICAL THREATS AND TERRORISM Moser R Jr, White GL, Lewis-Younger CR, Garrett LC. 2001. Preparing for expected bioterrorism attacks. Military Medicine 166(5):369–374. O’Toole T, Inglesby T. June 2001. Shining light on Dark Winter. Online. Avail- able at: www.hopkins-biodefense.org. Accessed October 30, 2001. Rotz LD, Koo D, O’Carroll PW, Kellogg RB, Sage MJ, Lillibridge SR. 2000. Bioterrorism preparedness: Planning for the future. Journal of Public Health Management and Practice 6(4):45–49. Schoch-Spana M. 2000. Implications of pandemic influenza for bioterrorism response. Clinical Infectious Diseases 31(6):1409–1413. Available at: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/CID/journal/contents/v31n6.html. Teeter DS, Koenig KL. 2000. VA’s role in bioterrorism preparations. American Journal of Infection Control 28(4):321. Terriff CM, Tee AM. 2001. Citywide pharmaceutical preparation for bioter- rorism. American Journal of Health-System Pharmacists 58(3):233–237. World Health Organization. 2001. Public health response to biological and chemical weapons: WHO Guidance. Second edition. Geneva: World Health Organization. Available at: http://www.who.int/emc/pdfs/BIOWEAPONS_exec_sum2.pdf. Monitoring and Surveillance Tools ESSENCE: Electronic Surveillance System for the Early Notification of Com- munity-Based Epidemics. Information available at: www.geis.ha.osd.mil. Morse SS, Rosenberg BH, Woodall J. 1996. ProMED global monitoring of emerging diseases: Design for a demonstration program. Health Policy 38(3):135–153. Detection and Diagnostic Capabilities Krenzelok EP. 2001. The critical role of the Poison Center in the recognition, mitigation and management of biological and chemical terrorism. (Abstract only) Przegl Lek 58(4):177–181. Morse SS. 1996. Importance of molecular diagnostics in the identification and control of emerging infections. Molecular Diagnostics 1(3):201–206. Laboratory Capacity Gilchrist MJ. 2000. A national laboratory network for bioterrorism: Evolution from a prototype network of laboratories performing routine surveillance. Military Medicine 165(7 Supplement 2):28–31. Peterson LR, Hamilton JD, Baron EJ, Tompkins LS, Miller JM, Wilfert CM, Tenover FC, Thomson Jr RB. 2001. Role of clinical microbiology laborato- ries in the management and control of infectious diseases and the delivery of health care. Clinical Infectious Diseases 32(4):605–611. Available at: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/CID/journal/contents/v32n4.html. Training Capacity American Public Health Association. 2001. Effective public health assessment, prevention, response, and training for emerging and re-emerging infectious

APPENDIX B: INFORMATION RESOURCES 231 diseases, including bioterrorism. American Journal of Public Health 91(3):500–501. Available at: http://www.ajph.org/content/vol91/issue3/. Franz DR, Jahrling PB, Friedlander AM, McClain DJ, Hoover DL, Bryne WR, Pavlin JA, Christopher GW, Eitzen EM Jr. 1997. Clinical recognition and management of patients exposed to biological warfare agents. JAMA 278(5):399–411. Available at: http://jama.ama- assn.org/issues/v278n5/ffull/jsc71014.html. Pesik N, Keim M, Sampson TR. 1999. Do U.S. emergency medicine residency programs provide adequate training for bioterrorism? Annals of Emerging Medicine 34(2):173–176. Waeckerle JF, Seamans S, Whiteside M, Pons PT, White S, Burstein JL, Murray R, Task Force of Health Care and Emergency Services Professionals on Preparedness for Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Incidents. 2001. Ex- ecutive summary: Developing objectives, content, and competencies for the training of emergency medical technicians, emergency physicians, and emergency nurses to care for casualties resulting from nuclear, biological, or chemical incidents. Annals of Emerging Medicine 37(6):587–601. Hospital Capacity Wetter DC, Daniell WE, Treser CD. 2001. Hospital preparedness for victims of chemical or biological terrorism. American Journal of Public Health 91(5):710–716. Available at: http://www.ajph.org/content/vol91/issue5/. Protecting Food and Water Supplies Kaferstein FK, Motarjemi Y, Bettcher DW. 1997. Foodborne disease control: A transnational challenge. Emerging Infectious Diseases 3(4):503–510. Avail- able at: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol3no4/kaferste.htm. Khan AS, Swerdlow DL, Juranek DD. 2001. Precautions against biological and chemical terrorism directed at food and water supplies. Public Health Re- ports 116(1):3–14. Logan-Henfrey L. 2000. Mitigation of bioterrorist threats in the 21st century. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 916:121–133. Nara PL. 1999. The status and role of vaccines in the U.S. food animal industry. Implications for biological terrorism. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 894:206–217. Neher NJ. 1999. The need for a coordinated response to food terrorism. The Wisconsin experience. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 894:181–183. Pellerin C. 2000. The next target of bioterrorism: Your food. Environmental Health Perspectives 108(3):A126–129. Available at: http://ehpnet1.niehs.nih.gov/members/2000/108-3/spheres.html. Sequeira R. 1999. Safeguarding production agriculture and natural ecosystems against biological terrorism. A U.S. Department of Agriculture emergency response framework. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 894:48–67. Torok TJ, Tauxe RV, Wise RP, Livengood JR, Sokolow R, Mauvais S, Birkness KA, Skeels MR, Horan JM, Foster LR. 1997. A large community outbreak of salmonellosis caused by intentional contamination of restaurant salad

232 BIOLOGICAL THREATS AND TERRORISM bars. JAMA 278(5):389–395. Available at: http://jama.ama- assn.org/issues/v278n5/ffull/joc71206.html. Williams JL, Sheesley D. 2000. Response to bio-terrorism directed against ani- mals. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 916:117–120. INTERNET RESOURCES Federal Government Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Public Health Emergency Preparedness and Response: http://www.bt.cdc.gov Centers for Public Health Preparedness: http://www.phppo.cdc.gov/owpp/centersforPHP.asp Health Alert Network: http://www.phppo.cdc.gov/han Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Core Capacity Project 2001 Draft Report: http://www.bt.cdc.gov/RegionalMeetings/2001/2001RMSummary.asp Facts about Anthrax: http://www.bt.cdc.gov/DocumentsAPP/facts_about.pdf Use of Anthrax Vaccine in the United States: Recommendations of the Ad- visory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). MMWR. Dec.15, 2000;49:RR-15: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/rr/rr4915.pdf Anthrax Vaccine: What You Need to Know: http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/VIS/vis-anthrax.pdf Biological and Chemical Terrorism: Strategic Plan for Preparedness and Response. MMWR. April 21, 2000;49:(RR04);1–14. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/rr4904a1.htm Bioterrorism Alleging Use of Anthrax—and Interim Guidelines for Man- agement—United States 1998. MMWR. Feb. 5, 1999;48(4):69–74. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm4804.pdf Updated Recommendations for Handling Suspicious Packages or Envelopes (An Official CDC Health Advisory) http://www.bt.cdc.gov/DocumentsApp/Anthrax/10272001AM/han47.asp What Every Physician Should Know About Anthrax, Part I http://www.sph.unc.edu/about/webcasts/bioter_10-18_stream1.htm What Every Physician Should Know About Anthrax, Part II http://www.phf.org/anthrax2HTML.htm PulseNet--Foodborne Disease Surveillance http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dbmd/pulsenet/pulsenet.htm Central Intelligence Agency: http://www.cia.gov/terrorism/index.html Department of Defense: http://www.anthrax.osd.mil/ Department of Health and Human Services: http://www.hhs.gov/hottopics/healing/biological.html Department of Justice: http://www.usdoj.gov/ Department of Veterans Affairs: http://www.va.gov/emshg Federal Bureau of Investigation: http://www.fbi.gov/pressrel/attack/attacks.htm Federal Emergency Management Agency: http://www.fema.gov/ Food and Drug Administration: http://www.fda.gov/cber/faq/cntrbfaq.htm FirstGov: http://firstgov.gov/featured/usgresponse.html?ssid=1004388686307_172

APPENDIX B: INFORMATION RESOURCES 233 National Domestic Preparedness Office: http://www.ndpo.gov Federal Weapons of Mass Destruction Training Compendium: http://www.ndpo.gov/compenium.pdf National Library of Medicine: MEDLINEplus Health Information Anthrax: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/anthrax.html Biological and Chemical Weapons: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/biologicalandchemicalweapons.ht ml Office of Homeland Security: http://www.whitehouse.gov/homeland/ Sandia National Laboratories: http://www.sandia.gov/NERA/extdocs.htm Surgeon General: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/sgoffice.htm Anthrax/Bioterrorism: http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/topics/bioterrorism.htm U.S. Department of Agriculture: http://www.usda.gov/special/biosecurity/safeguard.htm U.S. Postal Service: http://www.usps.com/news/2001/press/serviceupdates.htm State and Local Governments California: http://www.dhs.ca.gov/bioterrorism/ Colorado: http://www.cdphe.state.co.us/dc/bioterror/bioterrorismhom.asp District of Columbia: http://dchealth.dc.gov/news_room/health_alert.asp?id=6&mon=200110 Florida: http://www.doh.state.fl.us/terrorism/index.htm Georgia: http://www.ph.dhr.state.ga.us/programs/emerprep/bioterrorism.shtml DeKalb County Board of Health Bioterrorism Response Plan prepared by the Center for Public Health Preparedness. Information available at: www.dekalbhealth.net. Illinois: http://www.idph.state.il.us/Bioterrorism/bioterrorismfaqs.htm Indiana: http://www.state.in.us/isdh/healthinfo/bioterrorism.htm Iowa: http://www.idph.state.ia.us/Terrorism/default.htm Kansas: http://www.kdhe.state.ks.us/han/bioterror.html Maryland: http://www.dhmh.state.md.us/phdsec/html/phalert.htm Massachusetts: http://www.state.ma.us/dph/topics/bioterrorism/BT.htm Minnesota: http://www.health.state.mn.us/bioterrorism/ New Jersey: http://www.state.nj.us./health/er/biofs.htm New York: http://www.health.state.ny.us/nysdoh/bt/bt.htm New York City: http://www.ci.nyc.ny.us/html/doh/html/cd/wtc8.html Oregon: http://www.ohd.hr.state.or.us/acd/bioterr/facts.htm Tennessee: http://www.state.tn.us/health/CEDS/bioterrorism.htm Texas: http://www.tdh.state.tx.us/bioterrorism/default.htm Virginia: http://www.vdh.state.va.us/bt/index.htm Wisconsin: http://www.dhfs.state.wi.us/dph_bcd/Bioterrorism/ Other state and local health departments: http://www.cdc.gov/other.htm Educational and Research Institutions Center for Nonproliferation Studies: http://cns.miis.edu/research/cbw/

234 BIOLOGICAL THREATS AND TERRORISM Columbia University: Center for Public Health Preparedness: http://cpmcnet.columbia.edu/dept/sph/CPHP/index.html Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government: Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs: http://www.ksg.harvard.edu/bcsia/ Humanitarian Resource Institute: http://www.humanitarian.net/biodefense Johns Hopkins University: Center for Civilian Biodefense Studies: http://www.hopkins-biodefense.org/ Massachusetts Institute of Technology: Center for International Studies: http://web.mit.edu/cis/ National Academy of Sciences: http://www.nap.edu/terror/ University of Maryland: Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland: http://www.puaf.umd.edu/CISSM University of Minnesota: Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy: http://www.cidrap.umn.edu Domestic and International NGOs CBACI Report: Bioterrorism in the United States: Threat, Preparedness, and Response: http://www.cbaci.org/CDCSectionLinksMain.htm Center for Strategic and International Studies: http://www.csis.org/homeland/index.html Chemical and Biological Arms Control Institute (CBACI): http://www.cbaci.org Chemical and Biological Weapons Nonproliferation Project: http://www.stimson.org/cwc/index.html Henry L. Stimson Center: http://stimson.org Institute for Homeland Security: http://www.homelandsecurity.org/index.cfm RAND Corporation: http://www.rand.org/hot/newslinks.html#terror TrainingFinder.org: www.TrainingFinder.org. Provides information on over 30 distance learning courses for public health professionals on bioterrorism and emergency preparedness. World Health Organization: http://www.who.int/home-page/ Communicable Disease Surveillance and Response: http://www.who.int/emc/diseases/index.html

Next: Appendix C Testimony of Joshua Lederberg, Ph.D. »
Biological Threats and Terrorism: Assessing the Science and Response Capabilities: Workshop Summary Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $42.00 Buy Ebook | $33.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

In the wake of September 11th and recent anthrax events, our nation's bioterrorism response capability has become an imminent priority for policymakers, researchers, public health officials, academia, and the private sector. In a three-day workshop, convened by the Institute of Medicine's Forum on Emerging Infections, experts from each of these communities came together to identify, clarify, and prioritize the next steps that need to be taken in order to prepare and strengthen bioterrorism response capabilities. From the discussions, it became clear that of utmost urgency is the need to cast the issue of a response in an appropriate framework in order to attract the attention of Congress and the public in order to garner sufficient and sustainable support for such initiatives. No matter how the issue is cast, numerous workshop participants agreed that there are many gaps in the public health infrastructure and countermeasure capabilities that must be prioritized and addressed in order to assure a rapid and effective response to another bioterrorist attack.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!