National Academies Press: OpenBook

Geoscience Data and Collections: National Resources in Peril (2002)

Chapter:Appendix D Types of Geoscience Data and Collections

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Types of Geoscience Data and Collections." National Research Council. 2002. Geoscience Data and Collections: National Resources in Peril. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10348.
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D
Types of Geoscience Data and Collections

TABLE D-1 Examples of Geoscience Collections

Auger samples

Fluid samples (oil, gas, water)

Geochemical powder samples

Hand samples (incl. geotechnical, rock, and mineral)

Ice cores

Paleontological samples (micro/macro)

Rock cores

Rock cuttings

Sediment cores

Sidewall cores

Thin sections and polished sections

Type stratigraphic sections

TABLE D-2 Examples of Derived and Indirect Geoscience Data

Geophysical Data

Paleomagnetic resistivity

Potential fields

Seismic data (hardcopy, films, digital)

Seismic refraction

2-D and 3-D seismic reflection

Surface & airborne data

Velocity

Vertical seismic profiles

Well logs (paper, fiche, digital)

Petrophysical Data

Lithology logs (incl. mud and gas logs)

Routine (porosity, permeability, grain density)

Special (porosity & permeability under confining stress, Archie cementation, saturation exponent, capillary pressure, relative permeability)

Geochemical Data

Analyses—hard copy, digital

Other Data

Maps (topographic, geologic, subsurface, base, lease ownership, digital well spots, alteration, soils, groundwater studies, sample location, etc.)

Field notes

Paper reports

Photographs (aerial, satellite, slides, prints, planetary)

Scout tickets (fiche and paper)

Drilling/completion reports

Drill stem & other tests

Stratigraphic tops

Production history

Source-rock maturity analysis

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Types of Geoscience Data and Collections." National Research Council. 2002. Geoscience Data and Collections: National Resources in Peril. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10348.
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Geoscience data and collections (such as, rock and sediment cores, geophysical data, engineering records, and fossils) are necessary for industries to discover and develop domestic natural resources to fulfill the nation’s energy and mineral requirements and to improve the prediction of immediate and long term hazards, such as land slides, volcanic eruptions and global climate change. While the nation has assembled a wealth of geoscience data and collections, their utility remains incompletely tapped. Many could act as invaluable resources in the future but immediate action is needed if they are to remain available. Housing of and access to geoscience data and collections have become critical issues for industry, federal and state agencies, museums, and universities. Many resources are in imminent danger of being lost through mismanagement, neglect, or disposal. A striking 46 percent of the state geological surveys polled by the committee reported that there is no space available or they have refused to accept new material. In order to address these challenges, Geoscience Data and Collections offers a comprehensive strategy for managing geoscience data and collections in the United States.

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