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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2002. Small Wonders, Endless Frontiers: A Review of the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10395.
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Appendixes

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2002. Small Wonders, Endless Frontiers: A Review of the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10395.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2002. Small Wonders, Endless Frontiers: A Review of the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10395.
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A

Meeting Agendas

AUGUST 30-31, 2001 WASHINGTON, D.C.

Thursday, August 30

7:30 a.m.

Continental breakfast

 

CLOSED SESSION

8:00

Executive session: Discussion of committee balance and composition, review agenda

9:30

Break

 

OPEN SESSION

9:45

Presentation of charge to committee/ discussion. Mike Roco, senior advisor, National Science Foundation

10:15

NNI Organization, Mike Roco, chair, National Science, Engineering and Technology Council’s subcommittee on Nanoscale Science, Engineering and Technology (NSET)

10:45

National Nanotechnology Coordinating Office (NNCO), Jim Murday, part-time director, NNCO

11:15

National Science Foundation Role in NNI, Mike Roco

11:45

Department of Defense Role in NNI, Jim Murday, superintendent, Chemistry Division, Naval Research Laboratory

12:15 p.m.

Lunch

1:00

National Institutes of Health Role in NNI, Jeffrey Schloss, program director, Technology Development Coordination, National Human Genome Research Institute, NIH

1:30

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Role in NNI, Murray Hirschbein, senior advisor to the chief technologist, NASA

2:00

National Institute of Standards and Technology Role in NNI, Chad Snyder, program analyst, NIST

2:30

Department of Energy Role in NNI, Pat Dehmer, associate director for basic energy science, DOE

3:00

Break

3:15

Environmental Protection Agency Role in NNI, Stephen Lingle, director, Environmental Engineering Division, EPA

3:30

Department of Justice Role in NNI, Trent DePersia, director, R&T Development Division, National Institute of Justice

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2002. Small Wonders, Endless Frontiers: A Review of the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10395.
×

3:45

Department of Commerce, Office of International Technology and Programs, Technology Administration Role in NNI, Cathleen Campbell, director, Office of International Technology, DOC

4:00

Department of Transportation Role in NNI, Annalynn Lacombe, program analyst, Transportation Strategic Planning and Analysis Office, Volpe National Transportation System Center, DOT

4:15

Central Intelligence Agency Role in NNI, Frank Gac, Directorate of Science & Technology, CIA

4:30

Follow-up and general discussion

5:15

Cocktails, committee and speakers

 

CLOSED SESSION

7:00

Committee dinner

Friday, August 31

 

CLOSED SESSION

7:30 a.m.

Continental breakfast

8:00

Executive session

 

Discussion of presentations Committee work plan Plan for future meetings

12 noon

Adjourn

OCTOBER 29-30, 2001 WASHINGTON, D.C.

Monday, October 29

7:30 a.m.

Continental breakfast

 

CLOSED SESSION

8:00

Executive session: Discussion of Monday agenda and other committee business

8:45

Break

 

OPEN SESSION

9:00

NSET and Agency Roles in Developing the FY2003 NNI Budget, James Murday, part-time director, NNCO (30 minutes for presentation, 30 minutes for Q&A)

10:00

Office of Management and Budget Role in Developing FY2003 NNI Budget, David Radzanowski, program examiner, OMB (30 minutes for presentation, 30 minutes for Q&A)

11:00

National Science Foundation, Establishment of Six NSF Centers for Nanoscale Research, Ulrich Strom, program director, Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers (30 minutes for presentation, 30 minutes for Q&A)

12 noon

Lunch

1 p.m.

Panel discussion: Agency Program Manager’s Perspectives on NNI

 

National Science Foundation—Ulrich Strom, program director, Materials Research Science and Engineering Centers

 

Department of Energy—Jerry Smith, program manager, Condensed Matter Physics; Dick Kelley, program manager, Materials Science

 

National Institutes of Health—Jeffrey Schloss, director, Technology Development Coordination, National Human Genome Research Institute

 

Department of Defense, Gernot S. Pomrenke, program manager, Optoelectronics and Nanotechnology, Air Force Office of Scientific Research

3:00

Break

3:15

Nanotechnology and National Security Research, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), Robert F. Leheny, Director, Microsystems Technology Office

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2002. Small Wonders, Endless Frontiers: A Review of the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10395.
×

4:15

Break

4:30

Follow-up and general discussion

 

CLOSED SESSION

6:30

Committee dinner

Tuesday, October 30

 

CLOSED SESSION

7:30 a.m.

Continental breakfast

8:00

Executive session

 

Discussion of presentations

Discussion of committee topical drafts

12 noon

Lunch

1 p.m.

Executive session

 

Discussion of committee topical drafts Develop outline for final report Next meeting

4:30

Adjourn

JANUARY 30-31, 2002 LA JOLLA, CALIFORNIA

Wednesday, January 30

7:30 a.m.

Continental breakfast

 

CLOSED WORKING SESSION

8:00

Review of meeting agenda and objectives

8:20

Discussion of draft sections

Short synopsis of team draft (5-7 minutes) followed by committee discussion introduction—Sam Stupp

8:45

Evaluation of Critical Program Areas—Mike Heller

9:15

Important Areas for Investment—Lynn Jelinski

9:45

Break

10:00

Social Science and the NNI—Denis Gray

10:30

NNI Partnerships—Tim Jenks

11:00

Program Management and Evaluation—Tom Theis

11:30

Overall draft observations

Inclusion of sidebars in the report?

12 noon

Lunch

Title of the report

Teams work on individual drafts

5 p.m.

Committee reconvenes

Discussion of revisions

5:30

Draft revisions to staff for duplication

6:30

Dinner—on your own

Thursday, January 31

7:30 a.m.

Continental breakfast

 

CLOSED WORKING SESSION

8:00

Review agenda

Discussion of revisions

8:15

Introduction–Sam Stupp

8:30

Evaluation of Critical Program Areas—Mike Heller

8:45

Important Areas for Investment—Lynn Jelinski

9:00

Social Science and the NNI—Denis Gray

9:15

NNI Partnerships—Tim Jenks

9:30

Program Management and Evaluation—Tom Theis

9:45

Sidebar recommendations

10:30

Break

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2002. Small Wonders, Endless Frontiers: A Review of the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10395.
×

10:45

What is missing?

11:30

Next meeting—March 4 and 5

Additional information?

All revisions to staff by February 15

11:30

Strategy for report dissemination

Who, what, where, and when?

12 noon

Adjourn

MARCH 4-5, 2002 WASHINGTON, D.C.

Monday, March 4

 

CLOSED SESSION

7:30 a.m.

Continental breakfast

8:00

Overview of meeting

OSTP visit

 

OPEN SESSION

9:00

Mike Roco, senior advisor, National Science Foundation

 

CLOSED SESSION

10:00

Break

10:15

Discussion

12 noon

Lunch

1 p.m.

Recommendations

1:30

Executive summary

2:00

Work on draft changes

6:00

Committee dinner

Tuesday, March 5

 

CLOSED SESSION

7:30 a.m.

Continental breakfast

8:00

Discussion

10:00

Break

10:15

Discussion

11:15

Recommendations—executive summary

12:15 p.m.

Lunch

1:00

Recommendations—executive summary

2:00

Title of report—cover design

3:00

Break

3:15

Report distribution

3:45

Role of committee—final review process

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2002. Small Wonders, Endless Frontiers: A Review of the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10395.
×
Page51
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2002. Small Wonders, Endless Frontiers: A Review of the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10395.
×
Page52
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2002. Small Wonders, Endless Frontiers: A Review of the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10395.
×
Page53
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2002. Small Wonders, Endless Frontiers: A Review of the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10395.
×
Page54
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2002. Small Wonders, Endless Frontiers: A Review of the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10395.
×
Page55
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Meeting Agendas." National Research Council. 2002. Small Wonders, Endless Frontiers: A Review of the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10395.
×
Page56
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Nanoscale science and technology, often referred to as "nanoscience" or "nanotechnology," are science and engineering enabled by our relatively new ability to manipulate and characterize matter at the level of single atoms and small groups of atoms. This capability is the result of many developments in the last two decades of the 20th century, including inventions of scientific instruments like the scanning tunneling microscope. Using such tools, scientists and engineers have begun controlling the structure and properties of materials and systems at the scale of 10?9 meters, or 1/100,000 the width of a human hair. Scientists and engineers anticipate that nanoscale work will enable the development of materials and systems with dramatic new properties relevant to virtually every sector of the economy, such as medicine, telecommunications, and computers, and to areas of national interest such as homeland security. Indeed, early products based on nanoscale technology have already found their way into the marketplace and into defense applications.

In 1996, as the tremendous scientific and economic potential of nanoscale science and technology was beginning to be recognized, a federal interagency working group formed to consider creation of a national nanotechnology initiative (NNI). As a result of this effort, around $1 billion has been directed toward NNI research since the start of FY 2001. At the request of officials in the White House National Economic Council and agencies that are participating in NNI, the National Research Council (NRC) agreed to review the NNI. The Committee for the Review of the National Nanotechnology Initiative was formed by the NRC and asked to consider topics such as the current research portfolio of the NNI, the suitability of federal investments, and interagency coordination efforts in this area.

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