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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2003. The Sun to the Earth -- and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10477.
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B Acronyms and Abbreviations


ACE

Advanced Composition Explorer

ACR

anomalous cosmic ray

AFOSR

Air Force Office of Scientific Research

AIM

atmosphere-ionosphere-magnetosphere

AMISR

Advanced Modular Incoherent Scatter Radar

ATST

Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

AU

astronomical unit (~150,000,000 km)

AURA

Associated Universities for Research in Astronomy


CEDAR

Coupling, Energetics, and Dynamics of Atmospheric Regions

CIR

corotating interaction region

CME

coronal mass ejection

COTS

commercial off-the-shelf


DOD

Department of Defense


EHR

Directorate of Education and Human Resources (NSF)

ESA

European Space Agency

EUV

extreme ultraviolet

eV

electron volt


FASR

Frequency-Agile Solar Radiotelescope

FAST

Fast Auroral Snapshot Explorer


GCR

galactic cosmic ray

GEC

Geospace Electrodynamic Connections

GEM

Geospace Environment Modeling

GEO

Directorate of Geosciences (NSF)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2003. The Sun to the Earth -- and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10477.
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GOES

Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite

GONG

Global Oscillations Network Group

GS

Geospace


IMAGE

Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration

IMF

interplanetary magnetic field

IMP-8

Interplanetary Monitoring Platform (8)

ISAS

Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan)

ISM

interstellar medium; also, Interstellar Sampler Mission

ISP

In-Space Propulsion

ITAR

International Traffic in Arms Regulations


JPM

Jupiter Polar Mission


L1

Lagrangian point 1

lidar

light detection and ranging

LISM

local interstellar medium

LWS

Living With a Star (NASA)


MagCon

Magnetospheric Constellation

MDI

Michelson Doppler Imager

MEMS

microelectromechanical systems

MESSENGER

Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging

MHD

magnetohydrodynamic

MHM

Multispacecraft Heliospheric Mission

MIDEX

Medium-Class Explorer

MMS

Magnetospheric Multiscale

MO&DA

mission operations and data analysis

MRX

Magnetic Reconnection Experiment


NASA

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

NOAA

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

NRA

NASA research announcement

NRC

National Research Council

NSF

National Science Foundation

NSO

National Solar Observatory

NSWP

National Space Weather Program

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2003. The Sun to the Earth -- and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10477.
×

ONR

Office of Naval Research

OSS

Office of Space Science (NASA)


PI

principal investigator

PIDDP

Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program

PSBL

plasma sheet boundary layer

PVO

Pioneer Venus Orbiter


RAO

Relocatable Atmospheric Observatory

RTG

radioisotope thermoelectric generator


SAMPEX

Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer

SDO

Solar Dynamics Observatory

SEC

Sun-Earth Connection program

SEP

solar energetic particle

SHINE

Solar, Heliospheric, and Interplanetary Environment

SMEX

Small Explorer

SMI

Stereo Magnetospheric Imager

SO

Solar Orbiter

SOFIA

Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy

SOHO

Solar and Heliospheric Observatory

SR&T

Supporting Research and Technology

SSX

Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment

STEP

Solar-Terrestrial Energy Program

STEREO

Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory

STP

Solar Terrestrial Probes (NASA)

SWS

Solar Wind Sentinels

SXI

Solar X-ray Imager


TEC

total electron content

TIMED

Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics

TRACE

Transition Region and Coronal Explorer

TWINS

Two Wide-Angle Imaging Neutral-Atom Spectrometers


UA

Upper Atmosphere base program

UNEX

University-Class Explorer

UV

ultraviolet

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2003. The Sun to the Earth -- and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10477.
×
Page168
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2003. The Sun to the Earth -- and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10477.
×
Page169
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2003. The Sun to the Earth -- and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10477.
×
Page170
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The sun is the source of energy for life on earth and is the strongest modulator of the human physical environment. In fact, the Sun’s influence extends throughout the solar system, both through photons, which provide heat, light, and ionization, and through the continuous outflow of a magnetized, supersonic ionized gas known as the solar wind.

While the accomplishments of the past decade have answered important questions about the physics of the Sun, the interplanetary medium, and the space environments of Earth and other solar system bodies, they have also highlighted other questions, some of which are long-standing and fundamental. The Sun to the Earth—and Beyond organizes these questions in terms of five challenges that are expected to be the focus of scientific investigations in solar and space physics during the coming decade and beyond.

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