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Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Occupational Classifications." Institute of Medicine. 2003. Who Will Keep the Public Healthy?: Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10542.
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Appendix E
Occupational Classifications

Occupation

Federal Agencies

Voluntary Agencies

State and Territorial Agencies

Total

Administrators

Health Administrator

1,152

14,768

15,920

Professionals

Administrative/Business Professional

3,133

1,592

4,725

Attorney/Hearing Officer

351

250

601

Biostatistician

684

480

1,164

Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologist

1

1

2

Environmental Engineer

3,092

1,457

4,549

Environmental Scientist & Specialist

3,951

10,931

14,882

Epidemiologist

5

922

927

Health Economist

86

19

105

Health Planner/Researcher/ Analyst

2,074

1,499

3,573

Infection Control/Disease Investigator

2

781

783

Licensure/Inspection/Regulatory Specialist

9,625

4,155

13,780

Marriage and Family Therapist

Medical & Public Health Social Worker

170

2,006

2,176

Mental Health/Substance Abuse Social Worker

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Occupational Classifications." Institute of Medicine. 2003. Who Will Keep the Public Healthy?: Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10542.
×

Occupation

Federal Agencies

Voluntary Agencies

State and Territorial Agencies

Total

Mental Health Counselor

113

673

786

Occupation Safety & Health Specialist

3,619

1,974

5,593

PH Dental Worker

1,240

792

2,032

PH Educator

126

2,104

2,230

PH Laboratory Professional

9,603

4,485

14,088

PH Nurse

4,311

8,000

36,921

49,232

PH Nutritionist

269

6,411

6,680

PH Optometrist

5

4

9

PH Pharmacist

1,180

316

1,496

PH Physical Therapist

12

60

72

PH Physician

4,055

1,953

6,008

PH Program Specialist

3,836

3,984

7,820

PH Student

37

14,996

15,033

PH Veterinarian/Animal Control Specialist

1,929

108

2,037

Psychiatric Nurse

4

4

Psychiatrist

1

1

Psychologist

688

67

755

Public Relations/Media Specialist

448

12

115

575

Substance Abuse & Behavioral Disorders Counselor

2

36

38

Other Public Health Professional

4,250

9,788

14,038

PH Professional, Title Unspecified

24,231

24,231

Technicians

Computer Specialist

2,565

1,761

4,326

Environmental Engineering Technician

294

120

414

Environmental Science and Protection Technician

228

273

501

Health Information Systems/Data Analyst

172

433

605

Occupational Health and Safety Technician

93

2

95

PH Laboratory Specialist

4,262

1,438

5,700

Other Public Health Technician

4,081

22,872

26,953

Technician, Title Unspecified

2,916

2,916

Protective Service

Investigations Specialist

326

50

376

Other or Unspecified Protective Service Worker

103

791

894

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Occupational Classifications." Institute of Medicine. 2003. Who Will Keep the Public Healthy?: Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10542.
×

Occupation

Federal Agencies

Voluntary Agencies

State and Territorial Agencies

Total

Paraprofessionals

Community Outreach/ Field Worker

102

574

676

Other or Unspecified Paraprofessional

1,134

17,768

18,902

Administrative Support

Administrative Business Staff

2,498

1,285

3,783

Administrative Support Staff

9,343

28,462

37,805

Unspecified Clerical/ Support

10,324

10,324

Skilled Craft Workers

Skilled Craft Worker

17

1,166

1,183

Service/Maintenance

Food Services/House-Keeping

12

313

325

Patient Services

Other or Unspecified Service/Maintenance

32

4,363

4,395

Category Unreported

Programs

7,202

7,052

14,254

Unidentifiable

443

171

97,268

97,882

Volunteers

2,864,825

5

2,864,830

Total w/Volunteers

85,754

2,880,210

347,120

3,313,084

Total w/o Volunteers

85,754

15,385

347,115

448,254

Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Occupational Classifications." Institute of Medicine. 2003. Who Will Keep the Public Healthy?: Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10542.
×
Page262
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Occupational Classifications." Institute of Medicine. 2003. Who Will Keep the Public Healthy?: Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10542.
×
Page263
Suggested Citation:"Appendix E: Occupational Classifications." Institute of Medicine. 2003. Who Will Keep the Public Healthy?: Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10542.
×
Page264
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Bioterrorism, drug--resistant disease, transmission of disease by global travel . . . there’s no shortage of challenges facing America’s public health officials. Men and women preparing to enter the field require state-of-the-art training to meet these increasing threats to the public health. But are the programs they rely on provide the high caliber professional training they require?

Who Will Keep the Public Healthy? provides an overview of the past, present, and future of public health education, assessing its readiness to provide the training and education needed to prepare men and women to face 21st century challenges. Advocating an ecological approach to public health, the Institute of Medicine examines the role of public health schools and degree--granting programs, medical schools, nursing schools, and government agencies, as well as other institutions that foster public health education and leadership. Specific recommendations address the content of public health education, qualifications for faculty, availability of supervised practice, opportunities for cross--disciplinary research and education, cooperation with government agencies, and government funding for education.

Eight areas of critical importance to public health education in the 21st century are examined in depth: informatics, genomics, communication, cultural competence, community-based participatory research, global health, policy and law, and public health ethics. The book also includes a discussion of the policy implications of its ecological framework.

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