National Academies Press: OpenBook
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×

COMBAT HYBRID POWER SYSTEM COMPONENT TECHNOLOGIES

TECHNICAL CHALLENGES AND RESEARCH PRIORITIES

Committee on Assessment of Combat Hybrid Power Systems

National Materials Advisory Board

Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design

Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS
Washington, D.C. www.nap.edu

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×

NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance.

This project was conducted under Contract No. MDA972-01-D-001 from the U.S. Department of Defense. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the organizations or agencies that provided support for the project.

Available in limited supply from:

National Materials Advisory Board

National Research Council

500 Fifth Street, N.W.

Washington, D.C. 20001

202-334-3505

nmab@nas.edu

Copyright 2002 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

Printed in the United States of America

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

Advisers to the Nation on Science, Engineering and Medicine

The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, sperpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Bruce M. Alberts is president of the National Academy of Sciences.

The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. Wm. A. Wulf is president of the National Academy of Engineering.

The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg is president of the Institute of Medicine.

The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Bruce M. Alberts and Dr. Wm. A. Wulf are chair and vice chair, respectively, of the National Research Council.

www.national-academies.org

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×

COMMITTEE ON ASSESSMENT OF COMBAT HYBRID POWER SYSTEMS

ROBERT GUENTHER, Chair,

Duke University, Durham, North Carolina

STEVEN A. BOGGS,

University of Connecticut, Storrs

MEHRDAD (MARK) EHSANI,

Texas A&M University, College Station

ROBERT LASSETER,

University of Wisconsin, Madison

BALARAMA V. MURTY,

General Motors R&D Center, West Bloomfield, Michigan

WILLIAM C. NUNNALLY,

University of Missouri, Colombia

MICHAEL RALEIGH,

Advanced Power Technologies, Inc., Alexandria, Virginia

National Materials Advisory Board Staff

ARUL MOZHI, Study Director

SHARON YEUNG DRESSEN, Program Officer (until July 2002)

EMILY ANN MEYER, Research Associate

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×

NATIONAL MATERIALS ADVISORY BOARD

JULIA M. PHILLIPS, Chair,

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

JOHN ALLISON,

Ford Research Laboratories, Dearborn, Michigan

FIONA DOYLE,

University of California, Berkeley

THOMAS EAGAR,

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge

GARY FISCHMAN,

University of Illinois, Chicago

HAMISH L. FRASER,

Ohio State University, Columbus

THOMAS S. HARTWICK, TRW (retired),

Redmond, Washington

ALLAN J. JACOBSON,

University of Houston, Houston, Texas

SYLVIA M. JOHNSON,

NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California

FRANK E. KARASZ,

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

SHEILA F. KIA,

General Motors Research and Development Center, Warren, Michigan

ENRIQUE LAVERNIA,

University of California, Irvine

HARRY A. LIPSITT,

Wright State University (emeritus), Dayton, Ohio

TERRY LOWE,

Metallicum, LLC, Santa Fe, New Mexico

ALAN G. MILLER,

Boeing Commercial Airplane Group, Seattle, Washington

ROBERT C. PFAHL, JR.,

Motorola, Schaumburg, Illinois

HENRY J. RACK,

Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina

KENNETH L. REIFSNIDER,

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg

PETER SCHULTZ,

Heraeus Amersil, Inc. (retired), Duluth, Georgia

T.S. SUDARSHAN,

Materials Modification, Inc., Fairfax, Virginia

JULIA WEERTMAN,

Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois

National Materials Advisory Board Staff

TONI MARECHAUX, Director

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×

BOARD ON MANUFACTURING AND ENGINEERING DESIGN

JOSEPH G. WIRTH, Chair,

Raychem Corporation (retired), Mt. Shasta, California

F. PETER BOER,

Tiger Scientific, Inc., Boynton Beach, Florida

PAMELA A. DREW,

The Boeing Company, Seattle, Washington

ROBERT EAGAN,

Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

PAUL B. GERMERAAD,

Augirin Systems, Inc., Cupertino, California

RICHARD L. KEGG,

Milacron, Inc. (retired), Cincinnati, Ohio

JAY LEE,

University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

JAMES MATTICE,

Universal Technology Corporation, Dayton, Ohio

MICHAEL F. McGRATH,

Sarnoff Corporation, Arlington, Virginia

MANISH MEHTA,

National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, Ann Arbor, Michigan

JOE H. MIZE,

Oklahoma State University (retired), Stillwater

JAMES B. RICE, JR.,

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge

ALFONSO VELOSA III,

Gartner, Inc., Portland, Oregon

JACK WHITE,

Altarum, Ann Arbor, Michigan

JOEL SAMUEL YUDKEN,

AFL-CIO, Washington, D.C.

Board on Manufacturing and Engineering Design Staff

TONI MARECHAUX, Director

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×

Acknowledgments

We thank the committee members for their participation in meetings and for their efforts and dedication in the preparation of this report. We also thank the workshop speakers (listed in Appendix A) and participants, including the study sponsors and liaisons, especially Robert Rosenfeld, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA); Marilyn Freeman, formerly with DARPA; Gus Khalil and Gene Danielson, U.S. Army Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command; and George Frazier, Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC). We thank the National Materials Advisory Board staff, especially Arul Mozhi, study director; Sharon Yeung Dressen, program officer; and Emily Ann Meyer, research associate.

This report has been reviewed by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process.

We wish to thank the following individuals for their participation in the review of this report: Andrew Frank, University of California, Davis; Michael Lanagan, Pennsylvania State University; Thomas Matty, SAFT America (retired); Ian McNab, University of Texas; Wilford Smith, SAIC; Joseph Wirth, Raychem Corporation (retired); and Douglas Witherspoon, UTRON, Inc.

Although the reviewers listed above have provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the conclusions or recommendations, nor did they see the final draft of the report before its release. The review of this report was overseen by William Agnew, General Motors Corporation (retired). Appointed by the NRC, he was responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this report rests entirely with the authoring committee and the institution.

Comments and suggestions can be sent via e-mail to nmab@nas.edu or by fax to (202) 334-3718.

Robert Guenther, Chair

Committee on Assessment of Combat Hybrid Power Systems

Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×

Tables and Figures

TABLES

ES-1.

 

Advanced Electric Motor Drives and Power Electronics,

 

2

ES-2.

 

Battery Technologies,

 

4

ES-3.

 

High-temperature, Wideband Gap (WBG) Materials,

 

5

ES-4.

 

High-power Switching Technologies,

 

6

ES-5.

 

Capacitor Technologies,

 

7

ES-6.

 

Computer Simulation for the Design of Storage Systems and Components,

 

8

1-1.

 

Notional Specifications for an FCS-like Combat Vehicle Established in 1997,

 

13

2-1.

 

Technical Challenges, Performance Metrics, and Research Priorities Associated with the Application of Electric Propulsion and Power Electronics to Combat Hybrid Power Systems,

 

20

3-1.

 

Theoretical Specific Energy of Typical Existing Batteries,

 

23

3-2.

 

Expected Practical Energy Density,

 

24

3-3.

 

Status of Battery Systems for Hybrid Vehicles,

 

25

3-4.

 

Typical Operations of Military Vehicles,

 

26

3-5.

 

The Ratio of Battery Weight to Total Vehicle Weight,

 

28

3-6.

 

Technical Challenges, Performance Metrics, and Research Priorities Associated with the Application of Batteries to Combat Hybrid Power Systems,

 

29

4-1.

 

Wideband Gap Materials Figure of Merit,

 

38

4-2.

 

Microwave Performance of Wideband Gap Materials,

 

38

4-3.

 

Technical Challenges, Performance Metrics, and Research Priorities Associated with the Application of WBG Materials to Combat Hybrid Power Systems,

 

40

5-1.

 

Technical Challenges, Performance Metrics, and Research Priorities Associated with the Application of Switching Technologies to Combat Hybrid Power Systems,

 

44

6-1.

 

Technical Challenges, Performance Metrics, and Research Priorities Associated with High Energy Density Capacitors,

 

55

7-1.

 

Description of CHPSET Components,

 

57

7-2.

 

Hybrid Vehicle Hardware Components Incorporated into the Systems Integration Laboratory,

 

58

7-3.

 

Technical Challenges, Performance Metrics, and Research Priorities Associated with Computer Simulation for the Design of Storage Systems and Components,

 

64

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×

FIGURES

1-1.

 

Basic CHPS/FCS power flow diagram,

 

12

1-2.

 

One version of the CHPS Notional Concept Vehicle,

 

12

2-1.

 

Motor torque-speed relationship,

 

16

3-1.

 

Power requirement of typical mobility of military vehicles,

 

26

3-2.

 

Battery weight/total weight ratio versus driving range on highway at 70 mph,

 

27

3-3.

 

Battery weight/total weight ratio versus driving range while climbing hill,

 

27

4-1.

 

Comparison of SiC and silicon dielectric strength,

 

32

4-2.

 

Comparison of conduction resistance for SiC and silicon,

 

33

4-3.

 

Comparison of silicon and SiC operating voltage and conduction resistance,

 

34

4-4.

 

Silicon carbide crystal and wafer plane orientations,

 

35

4-5.

 

SiC polytype for 1120 “a” plane,

 

35

7-1.

 

Mission plan for NRMM predictions using a route analysis tool kit,

 

62

7-2.

 

NRMM basic speed prediction methodology,

 

63

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×
This page in the original is blank.
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×
PageR1
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×
PageR2
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×
PageR3
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×
PageR4
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×
PageR5
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×
PageR6
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×
PageR7
Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×
PageR8
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×
PageR9
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×
PageR10
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×
PageR11
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2002. Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10595.
×
PageR12
Next: Executive Summary »
Combat Hybrid Power System Component Technologies: Technical Challenges and Research Priorities Get This Book
×
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

This book provides the detail from the NRC Committee on Assessment of Combat Hybrid Power Systems. This committee targeted three emerging technology areas: advanced electric motor drives and power electronics, battery technologies for military electric and hybrid vehicle applications, and high temperature wideband gap materials for high-power electrical systems. This committee also addressed three additional emerging technologies: high power switching technologies, capacitor technologies and computer simulation for storage system design and integration.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!