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Who Goes There?: Authentication Through the Lens of Privacy (2003)

Chapter: Appendix B: Briefers to the Study Committee

« Previous: Appendix A: Biographies of Committee Members and Staff
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Briefers to the Study Committee." National Research Council. 2003. Who Goes There?: Authentication Through the Lens of Privacy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10656.
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Page 207
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Briefers to the Study Committee." National Research Council. 2003. Who Goes There?: Authentication Through the Lens of Privacy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/10656.
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Page 208

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Appendix B Briefers to the Study Committee Although the briefers listed below provided many useful inputs to the committee, they were not asked to endorse the conclusions or recom- mendations, nor did they see the final draft of the report before its release. MARCH 13-14, 2001 WASHINGTON, D.C. Roger Baker, Department of Commerce and CIO Council Daniel Chenok, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of Management and Budget Sara Hamer, Social Security Administration John Woodward, RAND MAY 30-31, 2001 WASHINGTON, D.C. Lt. Cot. Robert Bollig, Executive Officer, Department of Defense, Biomet- rics Management Office Mike Green, Director, Department of Defense, PKI Program Management Office Cathy Hotka, Vice President, Information Technology for the National Retail Federation Mark MacCarthy, Senior Vice President for Public Policy, VISA USA 207

208 APPENDIX B David Temoshok, Office of Governmentwide Policy, General Services Administration Richard yarn, Chief Information Officer, State of Iowa WORKSHOP OCTOBER 3-4, 2001 HERNDON, VIRGINIA Michael Aisenberg, VeriSign Kim Alexander, California Voter Foundation Brian Arbogast, Microsoft Corporation Paul Barrett, Real User Corporation Stefan Brands, McGill University Roger Clarke, Xamax Consultancy Ply Lid and the Australian National University John Daugman, University of Cambridge Mark Forman, Office of Management and Budget Chris Hoofnagle, Electronic Privacy Information Center Paul Van Oorschot, Entrust, Inc. Margot Saunders, National Consumer Law Center Judith Spencer, General Services Administration Peter Swire, George Washington University Law School Paul Syverson, Naval Research Laboratory Brian Tretick, Privacy Assurance and Advisory Services, Ernst & Young JANUARY 9, 2002 PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA Christopher Kuner, Morrison and Foerster LLP MARCH 13-14, 2002 WASHINGTON, D.C. Patti Gavin, Social Security Administration Fred Graf, Social Security Administration Jay Maxwell, American Association of Motor Vehicles Administrators roe Sanders, New York State Department of Motor Vehicles

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Who Goes There?: Authentication Through the Lens of Privacy explores authentication technologies (passwords, PKI, biometrics, etc.) and their implications for the privacy of the individuals being authenticated. As authentication becomes ever more ubiquitous, understanding its interplay with privacy is vital. The report examines numerous concepts, including authentication, authorization, identification, privacy, and security. It provides a framework to guide thinking about these issues when deciding whether and how to use authentication in a particular context. The book explains how privacy is affected by system design decisions. It also describes government's unique role in authentication and what this means for how government can use authentication with minimal invasions of privacy. In addition, Who Goes There? outlines usability and security considerations and provides a primer on privacy law and policy.

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