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Globalization of Technology: International Perspectives (1988)

Chapter:A. The Council of Academies of Engineering and Technological Sciences

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Suggested Citation:"A. The Council of Academies of Engineering and Technological Sciences." National Research Council. 1988. Globalization of Technology: International Perspectives. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1101.
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APPENDIX A
The Council of Academies of Engineering and Technological Sciences

The Council of Academies of Engineering and Technological Sciences (CAETS),* an international nongovernmental association, was established in 1978 in recognition of the increasing dependence of nations for their economic and social welfare on technology and its advances. The Council’s primary purpose is to promote international cooperation in engineering and technology in order to facilitate effective contributions of technological progress to the societies of all nations.

The objectives of CAETS are to provide an international forum for the discussion of technological and engineering issues; encourage cooperative international engineering efforts; foster the establishment of additional national engineering academies; and contribute to the strengthening of engineering and technological activities in order to promote economic and social welfare throughout the world.

A significant and distinguishing characteristic of CAETS is its unique criteria for membership. Member organizations are composed of members elected by peers on the basis of significant personal contributions to engineering, technological sciences, or related technological activities. Member organizations are governed by their elected memberships, and, by significant activity, demonstrate the compatibility of their objectives with those of the Council.

The Council’s biennial convocations are the main mechanism for bringing together members of the international engineering community. Including the most recent convocation, six such meetings have been held.

*  

The organization was established in 1978 as the Convocation of Engineering Academies and Like Organizations. The current title was adopted in 1985.

Suggested Citation:"A. The Council of Academies of Engineering and Technological Sciences." National Research Council. 1988. Globalization of Technology: International Perspectives. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1101.
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  • The First Convocation, hosted in 1978 by the National Academy of Engineering of the United States, was an opportunity for the participating academies to review their history, experiences, and guiding policies and to set objectives and program issues.

  • The Second Convocation, hosted in 1980 by the Australian Academy of Technological Sciences, focused on the management of technological change.

  • The Third Convocation, hosted in 1981 by the National Academy of Engineering of Mexico, examined engineering education in developed and developing nations.

  • The Fourth Convocation, hosted in 1983 by the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences, focused on technological trends in aviation, biotechnology, artificial intelligence, new materials, and automated production.

  • The Fifth Convocation, hosted in 1985 by the Fellowship of Engineering of the United Kingdom, dealt with undersea engineering, food production, freight transport, telecommunications, and manufacturing in a global context.

  • The Sixth Convocation, hosted in 1987 by the National Academy of Engineering of the United States, examined the impact of technology on the global economy.

Suggested Citation:"A. The Council of Academies of Engineering and Technological Sciences." National Research Council. 1988. Globalization of Technology: International Perspectives. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1101.
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Page183
Suggested Citation:"A. The Council of Academies of Engineering and Technological Sciences." National Research Council. 1988. Globalization of Technology: International Perspectives. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1101.
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Page184
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The technological revolution has reached around the world, with important consequences for business, government, and the labor market. Computer-aided design, telecommunications, and other developments are allowing small players to compete with traditional giants in manufacturing and other fields. In this volume, 16 engineering and industrial experts representing eight countries discuss the growth of technological advances and their impact on specific industries and regions of the world. From various perspectives, these distinguished commentators describe the practical aspects of technology's reach into business and trade.

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