National Academies Press: OpenBook

Damp Indoor Spaces and Health (2004)

Chapter:Appendix A Workshop Presentations and Speakers

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Presentations and Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2004. Damp Indoor Spaces and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11011.
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Page333
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Presentations and Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2004. Damp Indoor Spaces and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11011.
×
Page334
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A Workshop Presentations and Speakers." Institute of Medicine. 2004. Damp Indoor Spaces and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11011.
×
Page335

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Appendix A Workshop Presentations and Speakers WORKSHOP ONE March 26, 2002 The Foundry Building 1055 Thomas Jefferson St. NW Washington, DC Review of Acute Idiopathic Pulmonary Hemorrhage in Infants Clive M. Brown, MBBS, MPH, and Stephen Redd, MD, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Overview of EPA Mold-Related Activities Laura S. Kolb, MPH, Indoor Environments Division, EPA Mold and Moisture Control Activities at HUD Peter Ashley, DrPH, Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control, HUD Overview of Mold-Related Research Activities in Finland Aino Nevalainen, PhD, Head of the Laboratory of Environmental Microbiology, National Public Health Institute, Finland Toxigenic Fungi: Are they significant environmental health threats? Dorr G. Dearborn, PhD, MD, Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio 333

334 DAMP INDOOR SPACES AND HEALTH Damp Indoor Spaces Investigation and Remediation Terry M. Brennan, MS, Camroden Associates, Inc., Westmoreland, New York “Toxic Mold”: History and Measurement John H. Haines, PhD, New York State Museum, New York State Biological Survey, Albany, New York WORKSHOP TWO June 17, 2002 Keck Center of the National Academies 500 Fifth Street NW Washington, DC Indoor Damp Spaces Epidemiology Bert Brunekeef, PhD, Professor of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute of Risk Assessment Sciences, University of Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands Experimental Methods to Assess the Pulmonary Effects of Fungi Carol Y. Rao, ScD, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Division of Respiratory Disease Studies, Field Studies Branch, Morgantown, West Virginia Consultant’s Viewpoint on Mold John A. Tiffany, MS, President, Industrial Hygienist, Tiffany-Bader Environmental, Inc., Lawrenceville, New York WORKSHOP THREE October 8, 2002 J. Erik Johnson Woods Hole Center 314 Quissett Ave. Woods Hole, MA Clinical Issues Eckardt Johanning, MD, MSc, Occupational and Environmental Life Science, Fungal Research Group, Inc., Albany, New York

APPENDIX A 335 Toxicology Joseph Brain, SD, Cecil K. and Philip Drinker Professor of Environmental Physiology, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health Limiting Conditions for Fungal Growth on Building Materials Susan C. Doll, ScD, Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health

Next: Appendix B Committee, Consultant, and Staff Biographies »
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Almost all homes, apartments, and commercial buildings will experience leaks, flooding, or other forms of excessive indoor dampness at some point. Not only is excessive dampness a health problem by itself, it also contributes to several other potentially problematic types of situations. Molds and other microbial agents favor damp indoor environments, and excess moisture may initiate the release of chemical emissions from damaged building materials and furnishings. This new book from the Institute of Medicine examines the health impact of exposures resulting from damp indoor environments and offers recommendations for public health interventions.

Damp Indoor Spaces and Health covers a broad range of topics. The book not only examines the relationship between damp or moldy indoor environments and adverse health outcomes but also discusses how and where buildings get wet, how dampness influences microbial growth and chemical emissions, ways to prevent and remediate dampness, and elements of a public health response to the issues. A comprehensive literature review finds sufficient evidence of an association between damp indoor environments and some upper respiratory tract symptoms, coughing, wheezing, and asthma symptoms in sensitized persons. This important book will be of interest to a wide-ranging audience of science, health, engineering, and building professionals, government officials, and members of the public.

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