National Academies Press: OpenBook

Valuing Ecosystem Services: Toward Better Environmental Decision-Making (2005)

Chapter:Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographical Information

« Previous: Appendix C: Production Function Models
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Valuing Ecosystem Services: Toward Better Environmental Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11139.
×

Appendix D
Committee and Staff Biographical Information

Geoffrey M. Heal, Chair, is Paul Garrett Professor of Public Policy and Business Responsibility and professor of finance and economics at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Business, and Professor of International and Public Affairs in the School of International and Public Affairs. He has also served as senior vice dean and academic director of the Columbia Business School’s M.B.A Program. Previously, he was a professor of economics at the University of Sussex (U.K.). His current research focuses on economics of natural resources and the environment, economic theory and mathematical economics, and resource allocation under uncertainty. Dr. Heal is a member of the Pew Oceans Commission, a director of the Union of Concerned Scientists, and a fellow of the Econometric Society. Dr. Heal received a B.A. in physics and economics from Churchill College in Cambridge, U.K., and a Ph.D. in economics from Cambridge University.

Edward B. Barbier is the John S. Bugas Professor of Economics at the University of Wyoming. Before joining the faculty of the University of Wyoming, he served in the Environment Department, University of York, U.K. and directed the London Environmental Economics Center of the International Institute for Environment and Development and University College, London. Dr. Barbier’s current research includes natural resources and economic development, economic valuation and use of wetlands, land degradation issues, trade and the environment, and biodiversity loss. He earned a B.A. in economics and political science from Yale University; an M.Sc. in economics from the London School of Economics and Political Science, U.K.; and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of London.

Kevin J. Boyle is Distinguished Maine Professor of Environmental Economics at the University of Maine. Dr. Boyle’s research interests are in understanding the public’s preferences for environmental and ecological resources and responses to environmental laws and regulation. In particular, his work focuses on estimation of economic values for environmental resources that are not expressed through the market. Dr. Boyle has served as associate editor of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management and of Marine Resource Economics. He has a B.A. in economics from the University of Maine, an M.S. in agricultural and resource economics from Oregon State University, and a Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of Wisconsin.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Valuing Ecosystem Services: Toward Better Environmental Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11139.
×

Alan P. Covich is a professor and director of the Institute of Ecology at the University of Georgia. He was previously a professor in the Department of Fishery and Wildlife Biology at Colorado State University and in the Department of Zoology at the University of Oklahoma. Dr. Covich’s research focuses on ecosystem functioning in temperate and tropical streams, including assembly of food webs, predator-prey dynamics and chemical communication, and crosssite comparisons of drought impacts on drainage networks. For the past 16 years, he has conducted research in the Luquillo Experimental Forest Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) site in Puerto Rico. Dr. Covich is a past president of the North American Benthological Society and the American Institute of Biological Sciences. He has an A.B. from Washington University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in biology from Yale University.

Steven P. Gloss is an ecologist with the U.S. Geological Survey’s Southwest Biological Science Center and is based in the school of natural resources at the University of Arizona in Tucson. Dr. Gloss was previously the program manager for biological sciences at the Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center in Flagstaff, Arizona and a professor of zoology and physiology at the University of Wyoming. He is a former member of the Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB), served on the National Research Council (NRC) Committee on Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research, and chaired the NRC Committee on the Missouri River Ecosystem Science. Dr. Gloss’ research interests include water resources policy and management, aquatic ecology, fisheries science, and conservation of native fishes. He received a B.S. in biology from Mount Union College, an M.S. in biology from South Dakota State University, and a Ph.D. in biology from the University of New Mexico.

Carlton H. Hershner, Jr., is an associate professor of marine science at the College of William and Mary and directs the Center for Coastal Resources Management at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science. His primary research interests are in tidal and nontidal wetlands ecology, landscape ecology, and resource management and policy issues. Dr. Hershner also conducts research in resource inventory procedures, habitat restoration protocols, resource management “expert system” development, and science policy interactions. He recently served as a member of the NRC Panel on Adaptive Management for Resource Stewardship. Dr. Hershner has a B.S. in biology from Bucknell University and a Ph.D. in marine science from the University of Virginia.

John P. Hoehn is a professor of environmental and natural resource economics at Michigan State University. His primary research interests include methods for valuing environmental change, economic analysis of policies and incentives for ecosystem preservation, water quality demands, and natural resource damage assessment. Dr. Hoehn received an A.B. in anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in agricultural economics from the University of Kentucky.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Valuing Ecosystem Services: Toward Better Environmental Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11139.
×

Stephen Polasky is the Fesler-Lampert Professor of Ecological/Environmental Economics at the University of Minnesota. He has served as a senior staff economist for the President’s Council of Economic Advisers and previously held faculty positions in agricultural and resource economics and economics at Oregon State University and Boston College, respectively. His research interests include biodiversity conservation and endangered species policy, integrating ecological and economic analysis, common property resources, and environmental regulation. Dr. Polasky previously served on the NRC Committee to Review the Florida Keys Carrying Capacity Study. He is currently a member of the EPA’s Science Advisory Board Environmental Economics Advisory Committee. He received a B.A. from Williams College and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.

Catherine M. Pringle is a professor at the Institute of Ecology of the University of Georgia. Her research areas are aquatic ecology, tropical ecology, conservation biology, nutrient cycling, and effects of environmental problems on the ecology of aquatic ecosystems. Her main research sites are at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica, the Luquillo LTER site in Puerto Rico, and the Coweeta LTER site in North Carolina. She is past president of the North American Benthological Society and chair of the Ecological Society of America’s Sustainable Biosphere Initiative Advisory Committee. Dr. Pringle received her B.S. in botany and her Ph.D. in aquatic biology from the University of Michigan.

Kathleen Segerson is a professor and head of the Department of Economics at the University of Connecticut. Dr. Segerson previously held a faculty position in agricultural economics at the University of Wisconsin. Her fields of research include environmental and natural resource economics, the economic implications of environmental management techniques, and the use of economic incentives in resource policy. Dr. Segerson previously served on the NRC Committee on Causes and Management of Coastal Eutrophication and is currently a member of the EPA’s Science Advisory Board Environmental Economics Advisory Committee. She received a B.A. from Dartmouth College and a Ph.D. in agricultural economics from Cornell University.

Kristin Shrader-Frechette is the O’Neill Professor of Philosophy and concurrent professor of biological sciences at the University of Notre Dame. Dr. Shader-Frechette previously held professorships at the University of Florida and the University of California, St. Barbara. Her research focuses primarily on environmental ethics and policy, quantitative risk assessment, philosophy of science, and normative ethics. She was an associate editor of BioScience until 2002 and is currently editor-in-chief of the Oxford University Press monograph series on Environmental Ethics and Science Policy. She is past president of the Risk Assessment and Policy Association and the International Society for Environmental Ethics. She has served on the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and several NRC committees. Dr. Shader-Frechette received a B.A. in mathematics from Edgecliff College of Xavier University and a Ph.D. in phi-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Valuing Ecosystem Services: Toward Better Environmental Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11139.
×

losophy from the University of Notre Dame. She has completed post-docs in biology, in hydrogeology, and economics.

STAFF

Mark C. Gibson is a senior program officer at the NRC’s Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB) and was responsible for the completion of this report. Since joining the NRC in 1998, he has served as study director for six committees, including the Committee on Drinking Water Contaminants that released three reports, the Committee to Improve the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program, and the Committee on Indicators for Waterborne Pathogens. He is currently directing the Committee on Water Quality Improvement for the Pittsburgh Region. Mr. Gibson received his B.S. in biology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and his M.S. in environmental science and policy in biology from George Mason University.

Ellen A. de Guzman is a research associate at the WSTB. She has worked on many NRC studies, including the Committee on Privatization of Water Services in the United States, Committee to Improve the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program, and the Committee on Drinking Water Contaminants. She co-edits the WSTB Newsletter and annual report and manages the WSTB web site. She received her B.A. from the University of the Philippines.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Valuing Ecosystem Services: Toward Better Environmental Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11139.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Valuing Ecosystem Services: Toward Better Environmental Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11139.
×
Page274
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Valuing Ecosystem Services: Toward Better Environmental Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11139.
×
Page275
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Valuing Ecosystem Services: Toward Better Environmental Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11139.
×
Page276
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Valuing Ecosystem Services: Toward Better Environmental Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11139.
×
Page277
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee and Staff Biographical Information." National Research Council. 2005. Valuing Ecosystem Services: Toward Better Environmental Decision-Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11139.
×
Page278
Valuing Ecosystem Services: Toward Better Environmental Decision-Making Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $55.00 Buy Ebook | $43.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Nutrient recycling, habitat for plants and animals, flood control, and water supply are among the many beneficial services provided by aquatic ecosystems. In making decisions about human activities, such as draining a wetland for a housing development, it is essential to consider both the value of the development and the value of the ecosystem services that could be lost. Despite a growing recognition of the importance of ecosystem services, their value is often overlooked in environmental decision-making. This report identifies methods for assigning economic value to ecosystem services—even intangible ones—and calls for greater collaboration between ecologists and economists in such efforts.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!