National Academies Press: OpenBook
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×

Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data

Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond

Committee on Environmental Satellite Data Utilization

Space Studies Board

Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board

Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences

Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate

Division on Earth and Life Sciences

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS
Washington, D.C.
www.nap.edu

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS
500 Fifth Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20001

NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the task group responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance.

This study was supported by Contract NASW-01001 between the National Academy of Sciences and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, with technical participation by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the organizations or agencies that provided support for the project.

International Standard Book Number 0-309-09235-3 (book)

International Standard Book Number 0-309-53270-1 (PDF)

Cover: This image of Earth is a compilation of several data sets produced by NASA’s Earth Observing System and includes cloud cover, vegetation, fires, and sea-surface temperature. From the data set for sea-surface temperature, the 1997-1998 El Niño is clearly visible. SOURCE: Courtesy of R.B. Husar, Washington University.

Copies of this report are available free of charge from:

Space Studies Board

National Research Council

The Keck Center of the National Academies

500 Fifth Street, N.W.

Washington, DC 20001

Additional copies of this report are available from the
National Academies Press,
500 Fifth Street, N.W., Lockbox 285, Washington, DC 20055; (800) 624-6242 or (202) 334-3313 (in the Washington metropolitan area); Internet, http://www.nap.edu.

Copyright 2004 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

Printed in the United States of America

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

Advisers to the Nation on Science, Engineering, and Medicine

The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Bruce M. Alberts is president of the National Academy of Sciences.

The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. Wm. A. Wulf is president of the National Academy of Engineering.

The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg is president of the Institute of Medicine.

The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Bruce M. Alberts and Dr. Wm. A. Wulf are chair and vice chair, respectively, of the National Research Council.

www.national-academies.org

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×

PERTINENT REPORTS OF THE SPACE STUDIES BOARD, THE BOARD ON ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES AND CLIMATE, AND THE AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ENGINEERING BOARD

Fair Weather: Effective Partnerships in Weather and Climate Services (BASC and the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, 2003)

Satellite Observations of the Earth’s Environment: Accelerating the Transition of Research to Operations (2003)

Review of NASA’s Earth Science Enterprise Applications Program Plan (SSB, 2002)

The Sun to the Earth—and Beyond: A Decadal Research Strategy in Solar and Space Physics (SSB, 2002)

Assessment of the Usefulness and Availability of NASA’s Earth and Space Science Mission Data (SSB, 2002)

Toward New Partnerships in Remote Sensing: Government, the Private Sector, and Earth Science Research (SSB, 2002)

Assessment of the Usefulness and Availability of NASA’s Earth and Space Mission Data (SSB, 2002)

A Climate Services Vision: First Steps Toward the Future (BASC, 2001)

Transforming Remote Sensing Data into Information and Applications (SSB, 2001)

Assessment of Mission Size Trade-offs for NASA’s Earth and Space Science Missions (SSB, 2000)

Ensuring the Climate Record from the NPP and NPOESS Meteorological Satellites (SSB, 2000)

Issues in the Integration of Research and Operational Satellite Systems for Climate Research: I. Science and Design (SSB, 2000)

Issues in the Integration of Research and Operational Satellite Systems for Climate Research: II. Implementation (SSB, 2000)

“On Continuing Assessment of Technology Development in NASA’s Office of Space Science” (SSB, 2000)

“On Review of Scientific Aspects of the NASA Triana Mission” (SSB, BASC, and the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, 2000)

“On the Space Science Enterprise Draft Strategic Plan” (SSB, 2000)

Review of NASA’s Earth Science Enterprise Research Strategy for 2000-2010 (SSB, 2000)

The Role of Small Satellites in NASA and NOAA Earth Observation Programs (SSB, 2000)

Transition from Research to Operations in Weather Satellites and Numerical Weather Prediction (BASC, 2000)

“Assessment of NASA’s Plans for Post-2002 Earth Observing Missions” (SSB, BASC, and the Board on Sustainable Development, 1999)

Adequacy of Climate Observing Systems (BASC, 1999)

Copies of SSB reports are available free of charge from:

Space Studies Board

The Keck Center of the National Academies

500 Fifth Street, N.W.

Washington, DC 20001

(202) 334-3477

ssb@nas.edu

www.nationalacademies.org/ssb/ssb.html

NOTE: Listed according to year of approval for release.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×

COMMITTEE ON ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE DATA UTILIZATION

HUNG-LUNG ALLEN HUANG,

University of Wisconsin-Madison,

Chair

PHILIP E. ARDANUY,

Raytheon Information Solutions

JOHN R. CHRISTY,

University of Alabama, Huntsville

JAMES FREW,

University of California, Santa Barbara

SUSAN B. FRUCHTER,

Smithsonian Institution

ARIS GEORGAKAKOS,

Georgia Institute of Technology

YING-HWA (BILL) KUO,

University Corporation for Atmospheric Research

DAVID S. LINDEN,

DSL Consulting, Inc.

KEVIN PRICE,

University of Kansas

STEVEN W. RUNNING,

University of Montana

MARIJEAN T. SEELBACH,

Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company

THOMAS H. VONDER HAAR,

Colorado State University

ROBERT A. WELLER,

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Staff

ROBERT L. RIEMER, Study Director

RICHARD LESHNER, Research Associate

ROSALYN A. PERTZBORN, Assistant to Chair,

University of Wisconsin-Madison (from August 2003)

BRIAN OSBORNE, Assistant to Chair,

University of Wisconsin-Madison (through July 2003)

CLAUDETTE K. BAYLOR FLEMING, Senior Program Assistant

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×

SPACE STUDIES BOARD

LENNARD A. FISK,

University of Michigan,

Chair

GEORGE A. PAULIKAS,

The Aerospace Corporation (retired),

Vice Chair

DANIEL N. BAKER,

University of Colorado

ANA P. BARROS,

Duke University

RETA F. BEEBE,

New Mexico State University

ROGER D. BLANDFORD,

Stanford University

RADFORD BYERLY, JR.,

University of Colorado

JUDITH A. CURRY,

Georgia Institute of Technology

JACK D. FARMER,

Arizona State University

JACQUELINE N. HEWITT,

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

DONALD INGBER,

Harvard Medical School

RALPH H. JACOBSON,

The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory (retired)

TAMARA E. JERNIGAN,

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

MARGARET G. KIVELSON,

University of California, Los Angeles

CALVIN W. LOWE,

Bowie State University

HARRY Y. McSWEEN, JR.,

University of Tennessee

BERRIEN MOORE III,

University of New Hampshire

NORMAN NEUREITER,

Texas Instruments (retired)

SUZANNE OPARIL,

University of Alabama, Birmingham

RONALD F. PROBSTEIN,

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

DENNIS W. READEY,

Colorado School of Mines

ANNA-LOUISE REYSENBACH,

Portland State University

ROALD Z. SAGDEEV,

University of Maryland

CAROLUS J. SCHRIJVER,

Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory

HARVEY D. TANANBAUM,

Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory

J. CRAIG WHEELER,

University of Texas, Austin

A. THOMAS YOUNG,

Lockheed Martin Corporation (retired)

JOSEPH K. ALEXANDER, Director

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×

AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ENGINEERING BOARD

WILLIAM W. HOOVER,

U.S. Air Force (retired),

Chair

RUZENA K. BAJCSY,

University of California, Berkeley

JAMES (MICKY) BLACKWELL,

Lockheed Martin (retired)

EDWARD BOLEN,

General Aviation Manufacturers Association

ANTHONY J. BRODERICK,

Aviation Safety Consultant

SUSAN M. COUGHLIN,

Aviation Safety Alliance

ROBERT L. CRIPPEN,

Thiokol Propulsion (retired)

DONALD L. CROMER,

U.S. Air Force and Hughes Space and Communications Company (retired)

JOSEPH FULLER, JR.,

Futron Corporation

RICHARD GOLASZEWSKI,

GRA Incorporated

S. MICHAEL HUDSON,

Rolls-Royce North America (retired)

JOHN L. JUNKINS,

Texas A&M University

JOHN M. KLINEBERG,

Space Systems/Loral (retired)

ILAN M. KROO,

Stanford University

JOHN K. LAUBER,

Airbus Industrie of North America, Inc.

GEORGE K. MUELLNER,

The Boeing Company

DAVA J. NEWMAN,

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MALCOLM R. O’NEILL,

Lockheed Martin Corporation

CYNTHIA SAMUELSON,

Logistics Management Institute

KATHRYN C. THORNTON,

University of Virginia

HANSEL E. TOOKES II,

Raytheon International, Inc. (retired)

ROBERT S. WALKER,

Wexler and Walker Public Policy Associates

DIANNE S. WILEY,

The Boeing Company

THOMAS L. WILLIAMS,

Northrop Grumman Corporation

GEORGE M. LEVIN, Director

Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×

BOARD ON ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES AND CLIMATE

ROBERT J. SERAFIN,

National Center for Atmospheric Research,

Chair

FREDERICK R. ANDERSON, JR.,

McKenna, Long & Aldridge

ROBERT C. BEARDSLEY,

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

MICHAEL A. BENDER,

Brookhaven National Laboratory

ROSINA M. BIERBAUM,

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

RAFAEL L. BRAS,

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

MARY ANNE CARROLL,

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

WALTER F. DABBERDT,

Vaisala, Inc.

KERRY A. EMANUEL,

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

CASSANDRA G. FESEN,

Dartmouth College

JENNIFER A. LOGAN,

Harvard University

WILLIAM J. RANDEL,

National Center for Atmospheric Research

ROGER M. WAKIMOTO,

University of California, Los Angeles

JOHN C. WYNGAARD,

Pennsylvania State University

CHRIS ELFRING, Director

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×

Foreword

One of the principal functions of the Space Studies Board and the Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board is to anticipate problems and offer advice on how the relevant federal agencies can position themselves to avoid or mitigate particular issues. This report, Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond, is very much in that spirit.

The issue addressed by this report is threefold. We are ever more in need of being good stewards of our planetary home. We have as a potential resource the increasing availability of useful and important environmental data, particularly from space. We have an ever-broadening community of users who, armed with the knowledge of our environmental past and present, can effectively apply this knowledge to improve their own lives and advance the public good. The question is how to link the need, the availability of data that can offer solutions, and the users who can apply these data.

This report offers useful advice particularly to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, which has an increasingly important role in acquiring, but also in processing and archiving, environmental data and making it available to the broad and growing community of diverse users.

Lennard A. Fisk, Chair

Space Studies Board

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×

Preface

In 2001, following a National Research Council (NRC)-National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) workshop on opportunities for NOAA’s environmental satellite program, then Space Studies Board Chair John H. McElroy sent a letter to Gregory W. Withee, Assistant Administrator for NOAA’s Satellite and Information Services, outlining three potential studies (see Appendix A).

After discussions with NOAA and NASA the Committee on Environmental Satellite Data Utilization was established to address the following tasks (see Appendix B):

  1. Review the likely multiplicity of uses of environmental data collected by the nation’s operational environmental satellites, both in terms of the disciplinary applications of the data (e.g., research, operations, meteorology, hydrology, oceanography, rivers, coasts, fisheries, hydrology, agriculture, space weather) and in terms of the institutional or organizational origins of the users (e.g., intra-governmental (at all levels), international, regional, researchers, for-profit, non-profit, and educational entities).

  2. Characterize the likely interfaces between NOAA as a data provider and the range of data users, as well as third-party “added-value” commercial and non-profit users who broker applications by converting the data to a more usable form.

  3. Assess the implications of these multidirectional interfaces in terms of needs for (a) data accessibility and quality, (b) compatibility and cross-accessibility with data from other government sources, (c) data volume, (d) information technology, (e) user education, and (f) user participation in planning and performance feedback.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
  1. Identify critical factors that may drive the evolution of data management responsibilities in areas such as real-time processing; data stream transparency, traceability, access, and characterization; data archiving and retrieval; and reprocessing.

  2. Recommend appropriate approaches to secure the engagement of the science and applications community in successfully dealing with the challenges identified in the tasks above and in enhancing the utilization of both active short-term and long-term NOAA data archives.

This report presents the conclusions and recommendations developed by the committee in response to these tasks.

For their help in making its study possible, the committee acknowledges the many individuals who provided briefings and background material. They include:

Richard Anthes, Chair of the NRC Committee on NASA-NOAA Transition from Research to Operations and President of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research;

Ghassem Asrar, Associate Administrator, NASA;

John J. Bates, Chief, Remote Sensing Applications Division, National Climatic Data Center;

William Belton, Assistant Remote Sensing Program Manager, USDA Forest Service;

Robert “Buzz” Bernstein, SeaSpace, Inc;

Marie Colton, Director, Office of Research and Applications, NOAA/NESDIS;

Stanley Cutler, NOAA Consultant/Mitretek;

Gerald Dittberner, Chief, Advanced System Planning Division, NOAA Satellite and Information Service;

James Dodge, Research Division, Earth Science Enterprise, NASA;

Bradley Doorn, Remote Sensing Specialist, Production Estimates and Crop Assessment Division, Foreign Agricultural Service, USDA;

Robert Feden, Chief of Staff, Office of the Special Assistant, Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Networks and Information Integration)/Department of Defense, Chief Information Officer;

Mitch Goldberg, Chief, Satellite Meteorology and Climatology Division, Office of Research and Applications, NOAA;

Geoffrey Goodrum, NOAA/NESDIS;

Tony Hollingsworth, Head of Research, ECMWF;

David Jones, President and CEO, StormCenter Communications, Inc.;

Thomas R. Karl, Satellite and Information Services Director, National Climatic Data Center, NOAA;

Christopher Lynnes, Systems Engineer, Goddard Earth Sciences Distributed Active Archive Center;

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×

Stephen Mango, Chief Scientist, NPOESS Integrated Project Office, NOAA;

Ronald McPherson, Executive Director, American Meteorological Society;

Paul Menzel, NESDIS/NOAA;

Michael Moore, Dawn Lowe, Curt Schroeder, and Steve Fox, Raytheon;

Michael Mussetto, NPOESS SSPR Project Scientist;

H.K. Ramapriyan, R. Ullman, and K. McDonald, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center;

Richard G. Reynolds, Chief, Ground Systems Division, Office of Systems Development, NOAA/NESDIS;

Hans-Peter Roesli, Swiss Federal Office of Meteorology and Climatology (MeteoSvizzera);

Gary Route, NPOESS IDPS Chief Engineer;

Stanley Schneider, IPO/NASA;

Edward Sheffner, Applications Division, Earth Science Enterprise, NASA;

James Silva, Manager, NPOESS Data Exploitation Project and NPOESS Implementation Manager, Office of Systems Development;

Howard J. Singer, Chief, Research and Development Division, NOAA Space Environment Center;

Gurindar Sohi, University of Wisconsin;

John Townshend, Chair, Geology Department, University of Maryland, College Park;

Jeffrey Tu, NPOESS System Architecture Lead;

Louis Uccellini, Director, National Centers for Environmental Prediction, National Weather Service, NOAA;

Eric Webster, Majority Staff Director, Subcommittee on Environment, Technology, and Standards, House Science Committee;

David Williams, Head of Strategic Planning and International Relations, EUMETSAT;

Gregory Williams, Senior Policy Analyst, Earth Science Enterprise, NASA;

Gregory W. Withee, Associate Administrator for Satellite and Information Services, NOAA; and

Helen M. Wood, Director, Office of Satellite Data Processing and Distribution, NOAA Satellite and Information Service.

Page xiii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×

Acknowledgment of Reviewers

This report has been reviewed by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the authors and the NRC in making the published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process. We wish to thank the following individuals for their participation in the review of this report:

Grant C. Aufderhaar, The Aerospace Corporation,

Ana P. Barros, Duke University,

Jim Gray, Microsoft Bay Area Research Center,

Bruce D. Marcus, TRW (retired),

John H. McElroy, University of Texas, Arlington (retired),

J. Bernard Minster, University of California, San Diego, and

Robert J. Serafin, National Center for Atmospheric Research.

Although the reviewers listed above have provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the conclusions or recommendations, nor did they see the final draft of the report before its release. The review of this report was overseen by Roberta Balstad, CIESIN, Columbia University, and

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×

William G. Agnew, General Motors Corporation (retired). Appointed by the National Research Council, they were responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this report rests entirely with the authoring committee and the institution.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×

2

 

MULTIPLICITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL SATELLITE DATA USES

 

25

   

 Examples of Uses of Environmental Satellite Data in 2010,

 

25

   

 Forecasting,

 

27

   

 Monitoring of Climate Variability,

 

27

   

 Detection of Global Change,

 

28

   

 Economic Development,

 

29

   

 Resolution of Legal Issues,

 

29

   

 Public Health,

 

30

   

 Transportation and Recreation,

 

30

   

 Users of Environmental Satellite Data in 2010,

 

31

   

 Volume of Requests Made for NOAA-NASA Products,

 

33

   

 Scientific Applications of Environmental Satellite Data,

 

34

   

 Commercial Applications,

 

35

   

 Land Data and Land Management Agencies,

 

38

3

 

ENSURING DATA ACCESS AND UTILIZATION

 

42

   

 Making It Easier to Use Environmental Satellite Data,

 

42

   

 Meeting Users’ Requirements for Environmental Satellite Data,

 

44

   

 Direct Users,

 

44

   

 Indirect Users,

 

47

   

 Toward Enhanced Data Utilization—A Sampling of Current Efforts,

 

48

   

 The Geospatial One-Stop Initiative,

 

48

   

 The Experience with EOSDIS,

 

50

   

 Case Study of Temperature Measurements,

 

50

4

 

ASSESSING THE IMPLICATIONS OF MULTIDIRECTIONAL INTERFACES

 

53

   

 Data Integrity and Quality,

 

53

   

 Integrity,

 

53

   

 Identity,

 

54

   

 Quality,

 

54

   

 Lineage,

 

54

   

 Data Accessibility,

 

55

   

 Information Technology,

 

56

   

 User Education,

 

57

   

 User Participation in Planning and Performance Feedback,

 

58

Page xvii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×

5

 

CRITICAL FACTORS DRIVING THE EVOLUTION OF OPERATIONAL SATELLITE DATA MANAGEMENT RESPONSIBILITIES

 

60

   

 Real-Time Processing,

 

60

   

 Data Stream and Product Transparency,

 

62

   

 Data Archiving and Retrieval,

 

63

   

 Geospatial One-Stop,

 

64

   

 Reprocessing,

 

64

   

 Product Characterization—Addressing the Skill Levels of Users,

 

66

   

 NWP Data Assimilation Centers,

 

67

   

 Operational Forecast Centers and Decision Support Systems,

 

69

   

 Research Users,

 

70

   

 Resources,

 

70

   

 Partnership Responsibilities,

 

71

   

 User Pull: Innovation—In the Eye of the Beholder,

 

73

   

 Validation,

 

74

   

 Algorithm Development,

 

75

   

 Standard and Synergistic Development Process,

 

77

   

 Availability of Documentation,

 

78

   

 Mechanism for Portability,

 

79

   

 Update Process,

 

79

   

 Consistent Spectroradiometric Scales,

 

80

   

 Obtaining Desired Accuracies,

 

80

   

 Obtaining Inter-Comparable Data Sets,

 

82

6

 

FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

 

83

   

 The Value of and Need for Environmental Satellite Data in Addressing Specific User Needs,

 

84

   

 The Distribution of Environmental Satellite Data,

 

86

   

 Data Access and Utilization,

 

88

 

 

APPENDIXES

 

 

   

A   Letter to NOAA/NESDIS

 

93

   

B   Statement of Task

 

102

   

C   Previous NRC Statements, Findings, and Recommendations

 

106

   

D   Case Studies

 

116

   

E   Biographical Information for Committee Members and Staff

 

145

   

F   Committee Meeting Summaries

 

151

   

G   Acronyms

 

154

Page xviii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR1
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR2
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR3
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR4
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR5
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR6
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR7
Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR8
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR9
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR10
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR11
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR12
Page xiii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR13
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR14
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR15
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR16
Page xvii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR17
Page xviii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2004. Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11187.
×
PageR18
Next: Executive Summary »
Utilization of Operational Environmental Satellite Data: Ensuring Readiness for 2010 and Beyond Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $58.00 Buy Ebook | $46.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF
  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!