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Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations (2005)

Chapter:Appendix D Acronyms and Abbreviations

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2005. Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11379.
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D
Acronyms and Abbreviations


AAV

advanced air vehicle

ACLS

Automated Carrier Landing System

ACOMMS

acoustic communications systems

ACTD

Advanced Concept Technology Demonstration

AEHF

advanced extremely high frequency

AEW

airborne early warning

AFOSR

Air Force Office of Scientific Research

AFRL

Air Force Research Laboratory

AGS

Advanced Gun System

AGV

automated guided vehicle

AINS

Autonomous Intelligent Network and Systems (initiative)

AIP

Antisurface Warfare Improvement Program

ANS

Autonomous Navigation System

AOE

automated ordnance excavator

AOSN

Autonomous Ocean Sampling Network

ARL

Army Research Laboratory

ARPA

Advanced Research Projects Agency

ARTS

All Purpose Remote Transport System

ARV

armed robotic vehicle

ASH

autonomous search and hydrographic (vehicle)

ASM

antiship missile

ASN(RD&A)

Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, and Acquisition

ASW

antisubmarine warfare

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2005. Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11379.
×

ATD

Advanced Technology Demonstration

AV

autonomous vehicle

AWACS

Airborne Warning and Control System


BAMS

Broad Area Maritime Surveillance

BPAUV

battlespace planning autonomous underwater vehicle

BUGS

Basic Unexploded Ordnance Gathering System


C2

command and control

C2S

Command and Control System

C2V

command and control vehicle

C3

command, control, and communications

C3I

command, control, communications, and intelligence

C3ISR

command, control, communications, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance

C4

command, control, communications, and computers

C4I

command, control, communications, computers, and intelligence

C4ISR

command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance

CAP

combat air patrol

CAS

close air support

CDL

common data link

CECOM

Communications Electronics Command

CENTAF

U.S. Air Force, U.S. Central Command

CHBDL

common high-bandwidth data link

CLF

Combat Logistics Force

CMC

Commandant, Marine Corps

CNO

Chief of Naval Operations

CNR

Chief of Naval Research

COMINT

communications intelligence

CONOPS

concept(s) of operations

CONUS

continental United States

COTS

commercial off-the-shelf

CRW

canard rotor wing

CSG

Carrier Strike Group

CSP

constraint satisfaction problem

CTFF

Cell Transfer Frame Format

CU

Cruise Missiles and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

CV/LH

aircraft carrier/amphibious assault ship

CWSP

Commercial Wideband Satellite Program


D7G

combat engineering vehicle

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2005. Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11379.
×

DARPA

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

DDG

destroyer

DD(X)

future destroyer

DEAD

destruction of enemy air defense

DEUCE

deployable universal combat earthmover

DOD

Department of Defense

DSV

deep submergence vehicle


ECM

electronic countermeasures

EHF

extremely high frequency

ELINT

electronic intelligence

EM/EO

electromagnetic/electro-optical

EMS

electromagnetic sensing

EMW

Expeditionary Maneuver Warfare

EOD

Explosive Ordnance Disposal

EO/IR

electro-optical/infrared

ESG

Expeditionary Strike Group


FCS

Future Combat System (Army)

FDI

fault detection and isolation

FDOA

frequency difference of arrival

FLT

CNTL flight control

FMEA

failure modes and effects analysis

FNC

Future Naval Capability

FOC

final operational capability

FP

force protection

FYDP

Future Years Defense Program


Gbps

gigabits per second

GBS

Global Broadcast System

GEOS

Geosynchronous Earth Orbit Satellite

GHMD

Global Hawk Maritime Demonstration

GHz

gigahertz

GIG

Global Information Grid

GIG-BE

Global Information Grid-Bandwidth Expansion

GIG-E

Globat Information Grid-Expansion

GMTI

ground moving target indicator

GPS

Global Positioning System


HAE

high-altitude and -endurance

HALE

high-altitude, long-endurance

HDTV

high-definition television

HMMWV

high mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicle

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2005. Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11379.
×

IMINT

imagery intelligence

IMU

inertial measurement unit

INMARSAT

International Maritime Satellite

INTELSAT

Intelligence Satellite

IOC

initial operating capability

IP

Internet Protocol

IR

infrared

ISR

intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance

ISR&T

intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance, and targeting


JDAM

joint direct attack munition

JFACC

Joint Forces Air Component Commander

JMPS

Joint Mission Planning System

JPALS

Joint Precision Approach and Landing System

JPO

Joint Program Office

JSTARS

Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System

JTF

joint task force

JTRS

Joint Tactical Radio System

J-UCAS

Joint Unmanned Combat Air System

JWICS

Joint Worldwide Intelligence Communications System


kbps

kilobits per second


LADAR

laser detection and ranging

LCS

Littoral Combat Ship

L/D

lift to drag (ratio)

LD MRUUV

large-diameter multi-reconfigurable UUV

LDR

low data rate

LDUUV

long-distance unmanned undersea vehicle

LEOS

Low Earth Orbiting Satellite

LHA

amphibious assault ship (general purpose)

LHD

amphibious assault ship (multipurpose)

LIDAR

light detection and ranging

LMRS

Long-range Mine Reconnaissance System

LOA

level of autonomy

LOS

line of sight

LPD

amphibious transport dock

LRE

launch-and-recovery element

LRIP

low-rate initial production


MAE

medium-altitude and -endurance

MAGTF

Marine Air Ground Task Force

MARS

Mobile Autonomous Robot Software

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2005. Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11379.
×

Matilda

Mesa Associates’ Tactical Integrated Light-force Deployment Assembly

MCCDC

Marine Corps Combat Development Command

MCE

mission control element

MCG&I

mapping, charting, geodesy,and imagery

MCWL

Marine Corps Warfighting Laboratory

MDA

Missile Defense Agency

MDARS-E/I

Mobile Detection Assessment Response System-Exterior/ Interior

MDR

medium data rate

MEB

Marine Expeditionary Brigade

MEF

Marine Expeditionary Force

MICA

Mixed Initiative Control of Automa-teams (program)

MILSATCOM

military satellite communications

MMS

Mission Management System

MPF

Maritime Prepositioning Force

MPF(F)

Maritime Prepositioning Force (Future)

MPM

mission payload module

MP-RTIP

Multi-Platform Radar Technology Insertion Program

MRD

Maritime Reconnaissance Demonstration (program)

MRUUV

multi-reconfigurable UUV

MTI

moving target indicator

MULE

multifunction utility logistics equipment (vehicle)


NASA

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

NAVAIR

Naval Air Systems Command

NAVSEA

Naval Sea Systems Command

NBC

nuclear, biological, and chemical

NII

Networks and Information Integration

NMRS

Near-term Mine Reconnaissance System

NRAC

Naval Research Advisory Committee

NRC

National Research Council

NRL

Naval Research Laboratory

NRO

National Reconnaissance Office

NSWC/CD

Naval Surface Warfare Center/Carderock Division

NUWC

Naval Undersea Warfare Center

NWDC

Navy Warfare Development Command


O&S

operations and support

OASD

Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense

OAV

organic aerial vehicle

OCU

operator control unit

ODIS

Omni-Directional Inspection System

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2005. Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11379.
×

OMFTS

Operational Maneuver From the Sea

ONR

Office of Naval Research

OODA

observe-orient-decide-act

OPNAV

Office of the Chief of Naval Operations

OSD

Office of the Secretary of Defense

OSD(NII)

Office of the Secretary of Defense (Networks and Information Integration)

OTH

over-the-horizon


Packbot

versatile platform for military products

PEO

Program Executive Office

Perceptor

Perception for Offroad Robotics

PFPS

Portable Flight Planning System

PM-PSE

Program Manager-Physical Security Equipment

PMS

Program Management Office

PUMA

Precision Underwater Mapping System


QDR

Quadrennial Defense Review


R&D

research and development

RCSS

Remote Combat Support System

REMUS

Remote Environmental Monitoring Unit System

RF

radio frequency

RHIB

rigid hull inflatable boat

RMP

Radar Modernization Program

RMS

Remote Minehunting System

RONS

Remote Ordnance Neutralization System

ROV

remotely operated vehicle

RSTA

reconnaissance, surveillance, and target acquisition

RTIP

Radar Technology Improvement Program


S&T

science and technology

SA

situation awareness

SAHRV

semiautonomous hydrographic reconnaissance vehicle

SAM

surface-to-air missile

SAR

synthetic aperture radar

SAS

synthetic aperture sonar

SATCOM

satellite communications

SBR

space-based radar

SDD

System Development and Demonstration

SDR

Software for Distributed Robotics

SEAD

suppression of enemy air defense

SEAL

sea, air, and land (teams)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2005. Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11379.
×

SFC

specific fuel consumption

SHF

superhigh frequency

SIGINT

signal intelligence

SIPRNET

Secret Internet Protocol Router Network

SLAM

simultaneous localization and mapping

SOC

Special Operations-Capable

SPAWAR

Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command

SRS

Standardized Robotics System

SSGN

nuclear-powered guided-missile submarine

SSN

nuclear-powered submarine

STOM

Ship-to-Objective Maneuver


TALON

one robot solution to a variety of mission requirements

TAR

tactical autonomous robot

TCA

Transformational Communications Architecture

TCDL

tactical common data link

TCO

Transformational Communications Office

TCP

Transmission Control Protocol

TCS

Tactical Control System

TDOA

time difference of arrival

TPED

task, process, exploit, disseminate

TPPU

task, post, process, use

TRL

Technology Readiness Level

TUAV

tactical unmanned aerial vehicle


UAV

unmanned aerial vehicle

UCAR

unmanned combat armed rotorcraft

UCAV

uninhabited combat air vehicle

UCAV-N

uninhabited combat air vehicle-Navy

UCS

Unmanned Control System

UGCV

Unmanned Ground Combat Vehicle (program)

UGS

unattended ground sensor

UGV

unmanned ground vehicle

UHF

ultrahigh frequency

UNITE

UAV National Industry Team

URBOT

urban robot

USAF

U.S. Air Force

USN

U.S. Navy

USV

unmanned surface vehicle

USW

undersea warfare

UUV

unmanned undersea vehicle

UXO

unexploded ordnance

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2005. Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11379.
×

VDS

variable depth sensor

VHF

very high frequency

VMS

Vehicle Management System

VSSN

Virginia-class submarine

VSW/SZ

Very Shallow Water/Surf Zone (program)

VTOL

vertical takeoff and landing

VTUAV

vertical-takeoff-and-landing tactical unmanned aerial vehicle


WHOI

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

WNW

wideband network wave form


XUV

experimental unmanned vehicle

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2005. Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11379.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2005. Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11379.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2005. Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11379.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2005. Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11379.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2005. Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11379.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2005. Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11379.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2005. Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11379.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2005. Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11379.
×
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Autonomous vehicles (AVs) have been used in military operations for more than 60 years, with torpedoes, cruise missiles, satellites, and target drones being early examples.1 They have also been widely used in the civilian sector--for example, in the disposal of explosives, for work and measurement in radioactive environments, by various offshore industries for both creating and maintaining undersea facilities, for atmospheric and undersea research, and by industry in automated and robotic manufacturing.

Recent military experiences with AVs have consistently demonstrated their value in a wide range of missions, and anticipated developments of AVs hold promise for increasingly significant roles in future naval operations. Advances in AV capabilities are enabled (and limited) by progress in the technologies of computing and robotics, navigation, communications and networking, power sources and propulsion, and materials.

Autonomous Vehicles in Support of Naval Operations is a forward-looking discussion of the naval operational environment and vision for the Navy and Marine Corps and of naval mission needs and potential applications and limitations of AVs. This report considers the potential of AVs for naval operations, operational needs and technology issues, and opportunities for improved operations.

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