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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
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APPENDIXES

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
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Contributors

Stuart B. Adler is an assistant professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Washington. His areas of research include solid-state electrochemical engineering, electrocatalysis, ionic transport, ceramics, and fuel cells. Dr. Adler received a B.S. from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.

Peter N. Belhumeur, a professor in the Department of Computer Science at Columbia University and director of the Laboratory for the Study of Visual Appearance, received an Sc.B. in information sciences from Brown University in 1985 and a Ph.D. in engineering sciences from Harvard University in 1993. In 1994, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Cambridge Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences. After holding several positions in electrical engineering at Yale University, he joined the faculty of Columbia University as a professor of computer science in 2002. Dr. Belhumeur’s research on illumination, reflectance, and shape and their relation to visual appearance is concentrated on the representation and recognition of objects under variable illumination and the estimation of the geometry of objects from low-level cues, such as image brightness, binocular stereopsis, and motion. He is a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), the National Science Foundation Career Award, the Siemens Best Paper Award at the 1996 IEEE Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, and the Olympus Prize at the 1998 European Conference of Computer Vision. His re-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
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search is funded by the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Army Research Office, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Shirley Ann Jackson is the 18th president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York, and Hartford, Connecticut, the oldest technological research university in the United States. Dr. Jackson has held senior leadership positions in government, industry, research, and academia. She is immediate past president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and current chair of the AAAS Board of Directors; a member of the National Academy of Engineering; and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Physical Society. She also holds advisory positions and is an active participant in other prestigious national organizations: trustee of the Brookings Institution; life member of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Corporation; member of the Council on Foreign Relations; member of the Executive Committee of the Council on Competitiveness; board member of Georgetown University and Rockefeller University; member of the Board of Directors of the New York Stock Exchange and the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution; and director of several major corporations. In 1995, President William J. Clinton appointed Dr. Jackson chair of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). During her tenure at the NRC (1995–1999), she reorganized the agency and revamped its regulatory approach by moving strongly toward risk-informed, performance-based regulation. Prior to that, Dr. Jackson was a theoretical physicist at the former AT&T Bell Laboratories and a professor of theoretical physics at Rutgers University. She holds an S.B. in physics and Ph.D. in theoretical elementary particle physics from MIT and 31 honorary doctoral degrees.

Daniel M. Kammen, Class of 1935 Distinguished Professor of Energy, holds appointments in the Energy and Resources Group, Department of Nuclear Engineering, and Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the founding director of the Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory and co-director of the Berkeley Institute of the Environment. Until 1999, Dr. Kammen was on the faculty of the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, where he taught courses in science and technology analysis and policy. He is currently involved in long-term research projects on energy and development in Africa and Latin America and laboratory and modeling projects on clean energy futures. Dr. Kammen is the author of a book on environmental, technological, and health risks, Should We Risk It? (Princeton University Press, 2001), more than 160 journal articles, and numerous reports on renewable energy and development. He has been featured on radio, network, and public broadcasting programs and in print as an analyst of energy, environmental, and risk policy issues and current events. Dr.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
×

Kammen received an A.B. in physics from Cornell University and an M.A. and Ph.D. in physics from Harvard University.

Jay D. Keasling, a professor in the Departments of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering at the University of California, Berkeley, is also a faculty scientist and director of the Physical Biosciences Division at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and director of the Berkeley Center for Synthetic Biology. Dr. Keasling, a pioneer in the field of synthetic biology, conducts research on the engineering of microorganisms for the environmentally friendly synthesis of small molecules and the degradation of environmental contaminants. His laboratory has engineered Escherichia coli to produce polymers; a precursor to the anti-malarial drug artemisinin; and Pseudomonas putida to accumulate uranium and degrade nerve agents. Dr. Keasling received his B.S. in chemistry and biology from the University of Nebraska in 1986 and his Ph. D. in chemical engineering from the University of Michigan in 1991. From 1991 to 1992, he was a postdoctoral student in biochemistry at Stanford University.

Natalia L. Komarova is an assistant professor in the Department of Mathematics at the University of California, Irvine. Previously, she was assistant professor of mathematics at Rutgers University and a member of the School of Mathematics and the Center for Systems Biology at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. Her main interest is in the interface between mathematics and life sciences; she uses mathematics to address questions posed by biology (in the field of cancer and viruses), history, and linguistics. In 2002, Student Achievement & Advocacy Services awarded her the first Prize for Promise, given to a “woman of exceptional ability, ambition, brilliance, courage, dedication and vision.” In 2005, she received the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship in mathematics. Dr. Komarova is coauthor (with D. Wodarz) of Computational Biology of Cancer: Lecture Notes and Mathematical Modeling (World Scientific, 2005). She received an M.S. in physics from Moscow State University and an M.S. and Ph.D. (1998) in applied mathematics from the University of Arizona.

Kurt L. Kornbluth received a B.S. from Michigan State University and an M.S. from San Francisco State University in mechanical engineering and is currently a Ph.D. student in mechanical engineering at the University of California, Davis. Previously, as an instructor at the Edgerton Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he supervised student implementation of international development projects. As part of his Ph.D. research, Mr. Kornbluth worked as a design engineer at DEKA Research and Development in Manchester, New Hampshire, on the Stirling Engine Village Power Project, for which he developed a biogas venturi burner for use in developing countries. Previous to that he was director of operations and development engineer at Whirlwind Wheelchair International in San Francisco, where he managed international capacity-building projects,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
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implemented technical aspects, including wheelchair design and production tooling, and trained technicians in developing countries. Mr. Kornbluth designed and produced a prototype of a high-stability, compact, omni wheelchair, for which he was honored by the Rehabilitation Engineering Society of North America Paralyzed Veterans of America. As a participant in Whirlwind Africa 1, he worked with a design team to establish design criteria for a wheelchair for small-scale production in developing countries and designed a technology transfer kit for distributing the Africa-1 wheelchair design.

Daniele S. Lantagne is a staff engineer at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), where her primary role is to provide technical assistance and program support for projects to ensure safe water systems in developing countries. Her responsibilities include working with project partners in, and traveling to, developing countries to implement, provide technical assistance and program support, and assess water systems and other point-of-use water treatment projects; answering technical questions, writing informational fact sheets, and maintaining the safe water system website; and providing engineering expertise to the Foodborne and Diarrheal Disease Branch of CDC. Prior positions include principal, Alethia Environmental; lecturer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); program director, Ipswich River Watershed Association; outreach program coordinator, MIT Edgerton Center; and environmental engineer, Louis Berger & Associates Inc. Ms. Lantagne is a member of Sigma Xi and was a recipient of the Ipswich River Watershed Association Leadership Award. She received a B.S. and M.S. in environmental engineering from MIT.

Michael D. McGehee is an assistant professor of materials science and engineering at Stanford University. His research is focused on the electrical and optical properties of organic semiconductors, the self-assembly of inorganic nanostructures with organic structure-directing agents, and the fabrication of low-cost organic photovoltaic cells, light-emitting diodes, and transistors. Dr. McGehee is the recipient of a Henry and Camille Dreyfus New Faculty Award, a National Science Foundation CAREER Award, and the Dupont Young Professor Award. He received an A.B. in physics from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in materials science from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Matthai Philipose, a researcher at the Intel Research Laboratory in Seattle, conducts research on statistical reasoning and programming languages, with a special focus on systems that can automatically recognize human activities and the application of these systems to caregiving. Dr. Philipose heads the System for Human Activity Recognition and Prediction (SHARP) Project, which is working on the development of sensor-based systems that can recognize a large number, perhaps thousands, of day-to-day activities. He received a B.S. in computer

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
×

science from Cornell University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Washington.

P. Jonathon Phillips is program manager for the Face Recognition Grand Challenge and Iris Challenge Evaluation at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), as well as test director for the Face Recognition Vendor Test (FRVT) 2005. From 2000 to 2004, Dr. Phillips was assigned to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency as program manager for the Human Identification at a Distance Program. He received a U.S. Department of Commerce Gold Medal for his work as a test director for FRVT 2002. His current research interests include computer vision, face recognition, biometrics, digital video processing, methods of evaluating biometric algorithms, and computational psychophysics. Prior to joining NIST, Dr. Phillips developed and designed the FERET database collection and FERET evaluations at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory. He has organized three conferences and workshops on face recognition and three on empirical evaluation and coedited three books on face recognition and empirical evaluation. Dr. Phillips has been guest editor of special issues or sections of the IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence and Computer Vision and Image Understanding. He is an associate editor for IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence and guest editor of a special issue of Proceedings of the IEEE on biometrics. He is also a member of the IEEE. Dr. Phillips received a B.S. in mathematics and an M.S. in electronic and computer engineering from George Mason University and a Ph.D. in operations research from Rutgers University.

Sunita Satyapal, team leader for hydrogen storage at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), oversees the National Hydrogen Storage Project, which has a $150 million budget for five years. As part of President Bush’s Hydrogen Fuel Initiative, the focus of this project is on the development of materials-based technologies, such as metal hydrides, chemical hydrides, or high-surface-area sorbents, to store hydrogen for hydrogen-powered vehicles. Dr. Satyapal joined DOE in 2003 after working for eight years in industry at United Technologies Research Center and UTC Fuel Cells. During those eight years, she was responsible for managing various research groups of 15 to 50 scientists, engineers, and technicians working on a broad range of chemistry and chemical engineering technologies. She has also conducted research on laser diagnostics for the combustion of chemical warfare agents in the Department of Applied and Engineering Physics at Cornell University and taught chemistry at Vassar College. Dr. Satyapal is the author of numerous technical publications related to chemistry/ chemical engineering and the owner of 10 patents. She received a B.A. from Bryn Mawr College and a Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
×

Zoltán Toroczkai is deputy director of the Center for Nonlinear Studies at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). From 2000 to 2002, he held a Director’s Fellowship at LANL, and from 1998 to 2000, he was a research associate at the University of Maryland, College Park. His current research is focused on complex networks, specifically statistical physics of complex networks with applications to infrastructure networks and social systems; agent-based systems modeling, multiplayer games, game theory, collective intelligence, and optimization; massively parallel computation; and statistical physics and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, nonlinear dynamical systems and chaos, population dynamics, and species coexistence. Dr. Toroczkai is the author or coauthor of more than 50 publications in peer-reviewed journals. He received a master’s degree from Babes-Bolyai University in Romania and a Ph.D. in theoretical physics from Virginia Polytechnic and State University in 1997.

Alessandro Vespignani, professor of informatics at Indiana University, earned his Ph.D. from the University of Rome La Sapienza. After holding research positions at Yale University and Leiden University, he joined a group doing research on condensed matter at the International Center for Theoretical Physics (UNESCO) in Trieste, where he headed research and teaching activities for more than five years. He then joined the French National Council for Scientific Research, where he continued his academic work at the Laboratoire de Physique Theorique of the University of Paris-Sud. His recent research has been focused on the interdisciplinary application of statistical physics and numerical simulation methods in the analysis of epidemic and spreading phenomena and the study of biological, social, and technological networks. Dr. Vespignani is the author of more than 100 scientific papers on the properties and characterization of nonequilibrium phenomena, critical phase transitions, and complex systems and coauthor (with R. Pastor-Satorras) of Evolution and Structure of the Internet (Cambridge University Press, 2004). Dr. Vespignani was one of five scientists nominated for the Wired Magazine Rave Award in science for 2004.

Julie Beth Zimmerman, an assistant professor in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Virginia, teaches and conducts research on pollution prevention, green engineering, green chemistry, and sustainability. As engineer/program coordinator for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Research and Development National Center for Environmental Research, she manages academic grants for the Technologies for Sustainable Environment research program; coordinates Small Business Innovation Research contracts for clean technologies, pollution prevention, and research on waste minimization; initiated the P3 Award, a national student design competition; and initiated benchmarking of the integration of sustainability into engineering curricula at U.S. institutions of higher education. Dr. Zimmerman is a member of the steering committee for the U.S. Partnership for the U.N. Decade for

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
×

Education for Sustainable Development and has served on programming committees for the International Green Chemistry and Engineering Conference and the EPA Annual Green Chemistry and Engineering Conference. She is a member of numerous professional associations, including the American Chemical Society, American Society of Civil Engineers, American Society for Engineering Education, and Engineers without Borders. Dr. Zimmerman received a B.S. from the University of Virginia and an M.S. and interdepartmental Ph.D. from the College of Engineering and School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Contributors." National Academy of Engineering. 2006. Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on Leading-Edge Engineering from the 2005 Symposium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11577.
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This volume includes 16 papers from the National Academy of Engineering's 2005 U.S. Frontiers of Engineering (USFOE) Symposium held in September 2005. USFOE meetings bring together 100 outstanding engineers (ages 30 to 45) to exchange information about leading-edge technologies in a range of engineering fields. The 2005 symposium covered four topic areas: ID and verification technologies, engineering for developing communities, engineering complex systems, and energy resources for the future. A paper by dinner speaker Dr. Shirley Ann Jackson, president of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, is also included. The papers describe leading-edge research on face and human activity recognition, challenges in implementing appropriate technology projects in developing countries, complex networks, engineering bacteria for drug production, organic-based solar cells, and current status and future challenges in fuel cells, among other topics. Appendixes include information about contributors, the symposium program, and a list of meeting participants. This is the eleventh volume in the USFOE series.

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