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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2007. Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11948.
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Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007

Corrosion Education for the 21st Century

Michael H. Moloney, Editor

CORROSION EDUCATION WORKSHOP ORGANIZING PANEL

NATIONAL MATERIALS ADVISORY BOARD

DIVISION ON ENGINEERING AND PHYSICAL SCIENCES

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS

Washington, D.C.
www.nap.edu

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2007. Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11948.
×

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS

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NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance.

This study was supported by Contract No. HR0011-07-P-0008 between the National Academy of Sciences and the U.S. Department of Defense. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the organizations or agencies that provided support for the project.

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International Standard Book Number-10: 0-309-10893-4

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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2007. Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11948.
×

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

Advisers to the Nation on Science, Engineering, and Medicine


The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone is president of the National Academy of Sciences.


The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. Charles M. Vest is president of the National Academy of Engineering.


The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg is president of the Institute of Medicine.


The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone and Dr. Charles M. Vest are chair and vice chair, respectively, of the National Research Council.


www.national-academies.org

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2007. Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11948.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2007. Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11948.
×

CORROSION EDUCATION WORKSHOP ORGANIZING PANEL

FIONA M. DOYLE,

University of California, Berkeley,

Chair

RALPH ADLER,

Army Research Laboratory

RAM DAROLIA,

GE Aviation Engines (retired)

GERALD S. FRANKEL,

Ohio State University

RONALD M. LATANISION,

Exponent, Inc.

DAVID H. ROSE,

Quanterion Solutions, Inc.

JOHN R. SCULLY,

University of Virginia

MARK L. WEAVER,

University of Alabama

Staff

MICHAEL H. MOLONEY, Senior Program Officer

TERI TOROWGOOD, Administrative Coordinator

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2007. Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11948.
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NATIONAL MATERIALS ADVISORY BOARD

KATHARINE G. FRASE,

IBM,

Chair

LYLE H. SCHWARTZ, Consultant

Chevy Chase, Maryland,

Vice Chair

JOHN ALLISON,

Ford Motor Company

PAUL BECHER,

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

CHERYL R. BLANCHARD,

Zimmer, Inc.

EVERETT E. BLOOM,

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (retired)

BARBARA D. BOYAN,

Georgia Institute of Technology

L. CATHERINE BRINSON,

Northwestern University

JOHN W. CAHN,

University of Washington

DIANNE CHONG,

The Boeing Company

PAUL CITRON,

Medtronic (retired)

FIONA M. DOYLE,

University of California, Berkeley

SOSSINA M. HAILE,

California Institute of Technology

CAROL A. HANDWERKER,

Purdue University

ELIZABETH HOLM,

Sandia National Laboratories

ANDREW T. HUNT,

nGimat Company

DAVID W. JOHNSON, JR.,

Stevens Institute of Technology

ROBERT H. LATIFF,

SAIC, Alexandria, Virginia

TERRY LOWE,

Los Alamos National Laboratory

KENNETH H. SANDHAGE,

Georgia Institute of Technology

LINDA SCHADLER,

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

ROBERT E. SCHAFRIK,

GE Aircraft Engines

JAMES C. SEFERIS,

GloCal University

SHARON L. SMITH,

Lockheed Martin Corporation

Staff

GARY FISCHMAN, Director

MICHAEL H. MOLONEY, Senior Program Officer

EMILY ANN MEYER, Program Officer

TERI THOROWGOOD, Administrative Coordinator

HEATHER LOZOWSKI, Financial Associate

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2007. Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11948.
×

Acknowledgment of Reviewers

This report has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the National Research Council’s Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process. We wish to thank the following individuals for their review of this report:


Paul Citron, Medtronic (retired),

Carol A. Handwerker, Purdue University,

Srdjan Nesic, Ohio University, and

Lyle H. Schwartz, Consultant.

Although the reviewers listed above have provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the conclusions or recommendations, nor did they see the final draft of the report before its release. Responsibility for the final content of this report rests entirely with the authoring committee and the institution.

Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2007. Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11948.
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Preface

The U.S. industrial complex and its associated infrastructure are essential to the nation’s quality of life, its industrial productivity, international competitiveness, and security. Each component of the infrastructure—such as highways, airports, water supply, waste treatment, energy supply, and power generation—represents a complex system requiring significant investment. Within that infrastructure both the private and government sectors have equipment and facilities that are subject to degradation by corrosion, which significantly reduces the lifetime, reliability, and functionality of structures and equipment, while also threatening human safety. The direct costs of corrosion to the U.S. economy represent 3.2 percent of the gross domestic product (GDP), and the total costs to society can be twice that or greater.1 Opportunities for savings through improved corrosion control exist in every economic sector.

Better education for the nation’s engineers is essential to improving corrosion control and management practices throughout the national infrastructure. In this regard, an assessment of the corrosion curricula of undergraduate engineering schools is timely. With this in mind, the National Research Council (NRC) convened the 2007 Materials Forum on March 30th, 2007 to address corrosion education as it exists today.

The workshop, Corrosion Education for the 21st Century, brought together corrosion specialists, leaders in materials and engineering education, government officials, and other interested parties. The workshop was also attended by members of NRC’s Committee on Assessing Corrosion Education,2 who are carrying out a study on this topic. The workshop panelists and speakers were asked to give their personal perspectives on whether corrosion abatement is adequately addressed in our nation’s engineering curricula and, if not, what issues need to be addressed to develop a comprehensive corrosion curriculum in undergraduate engineering. This proceedings consists of extended abstracts from the workshop’s speakers that reflect their personal views as presented to the meeting.

I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the members of the Corrosion Education Workshop Organizing Panel for their hard work in preparing for and executing a very valuable workshop. I would also like to thank the speakers, panelists, and participants who attended the workshop for their critical contributions. Finally, I’d like to acknowledge the contributions of the NRC staff members Michael Moloney and Teri Thorowgood, without whom none of the good plans would have come to fruition.


Fiona M. Doyle

Chair

1

See Corrosion Costs and Preventive Strategies in the United States, available at <http://www.corrosioncost.com/downloads/pdf/index.htm>. Accessed April 2007.

2

For more information, see <http://www.nationalacademies.org/corrosioneducation>. Accessed April 2007.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Research Council. 2007. Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/11948.
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The U.S. industrial complex and its associated infrastructure are essential to the nation's quality of life, its industrial productivity, international competitiveness, and security. Each component of the infrastructure—such as highways, airports, water supply, waste treatment, energy supply, and power generation—represents a complex system requiring significant investment. Within that infrastructure both the private and government sectors have equipment and facilities that are subject to degradation by corrosion, which significantly reduces the lifetime, reliability, and functionality of structures and equipment, while also threatening human safety. The direct costs of corrosion to the U.S. economy represent 3.2 percent of the gross domestic product (GDP), and the total costs to society can be twice that or greater. Opportunities for savings through improved corrosion control exist in every economic sector.

The workshop, Corrosion Education for the 21st Century, brought together corrosion specialists, leaders in materials and engineering education, government officials, and other interested parties. The workshop was also attended by members of NRC's Committee on Assessing Corrosion Education, who are carrying out a study on this topic. The workshop panelists and speakers were asked to give their personal perspectives on whether corrosion abatement is adequately addressed in our nation's engineering curricula and, if not, what issues need to be addressed to develop a comprehensive corrosion curriculum in undergraduate engineering. This proceedings consists of extended abstracts from the workshop's speakers that reflect their personal views as presented to the meeting. Proceedings of the Materials Forum 2007: Corrosion Education for the 21st Century summarizes this form.
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