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Health Effects of Beryllium Exposure: A Literature Review (2007)

Chapter:Appendix: Biographic Information on the Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographic Information on the Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures." National Research Council. 2007. Health Effects of Beryllium Exposure: A Literature Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12007.
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Appendix Biographic Information on the Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures

Charles H. Hobbs (Chair) is director of the Toxicology Division of the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute and vice-president of the Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute. He also holds an appointment as clinical professor in the College of Pharmacy at the University of New Mexico. His research interests are in the long-term biologic effects of inhaled materials and the mechanisms by which they occur. His experience covers inhaled nuclear and chemical toxicants and infectious diseases and has ranged from physical and chemical characterization of airborne toxicants to in vitro mechanistic and toxicologic studies of dose-response relationships in laboratory animals. Dr. Hobbs is a national associate of the National Academies and has served on several committees of the National Research Council, including service as chair of the Committee on Animal Models for Testing Interventions Against Aerosolized Bioterrorism Agents and of the Committee on Submarine Escape Action Levels. He received his DVM from Colorado State University.


Patrick N. Breysse is a professor in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences and director of the Division of Environmental Health Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. He is also program director of the Industrial Hygiene Training Program and director of the Center for Childhood Asthma in the Urban Environment. His main research interest is in exposure assessment, including pollutant-source characterization; exposure measurement and interpretation; development and use of biomarkers of exposure, dose, effect; and evaluating relationships between sources, exposure, doses, and disease. Dr. Breysse codirected a medical screening program for former Department of Energy workers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and serves on the laboratory’s Beryllium Health and Safety Committee. He is a former chair of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Worldwide. Dr. Breysse received his MHS in occupational safety and health and his PhD in environmental health engineering from the Johns Hopkins University.


Scott W. Burchiel is a professor of pharmacology and toxicology in the College of Pharmacy at the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center. He is associate dean for research at the college, director of the New Mexico Center for Environmental Health Sciences, and a member of the University of New Mexico Cancer Research and Treatment Center. His research interests are in immunotoxicology, cancer research, pharmacogenomics, and biotechnology. His laboratory examines the effects of drugs and environmental agents on signaling pathways that control lymphocyte activation and apoptosis, proto-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographic Information on the Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures." National Research Council. 2007. Health Effects of Beryllium Exposure: A Literature Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12007.
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oncogene activation, and mechanisms of signaling in human mammary epithelial cells. Dr. Burchiel was a member of the National Research Council Committee on Assessing Human Health Risks of Trichloroethylene. He received his PhD in pharmacology from the University of California, San Francisco.


Lung Chi Chen is an associate professor in the Department of Environmental Medicine at the New York University (NYU) School of Medicine. He is also director of the Inhalation Facility for the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences Center of Excellence. His research interests are inhalation toxicology and exposure-response relationships. His recent research has focused on nanoparticle toxicity and functional use, the role of health disparity in air-pollution–induced cardiopulmonary diseases, and gene-environment interactions in environmentally induced diseases. Dr. Chen is vice president-elect of the Inhalation Specialty Section of the Society of Toxicology. He received his MS and PhD in environmental health science from NYU.


David Díaz-Sánchez is an associate professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests are in the use of human and animal models to understand the ability of environmental agents to affect immune responses, particularly agents that modulate allergic and asthmatic responses. His recent work has focused on how diesel exhaust particles exacerbate allergy and asthma, the role of phase II enzymes in conferring susceptibility to pollutants, and the role of oxidative stress in susceptibility to particulate matter and in the potency of particles in promoting airway inflammation. Dr. Díaz-Sánchez is a member of the National Ambient Air Monitoring Strategy Subcommittee of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Air Science Advisory Committee. He received his PhD from Guy’s Hospital in London.


David G. Hoel is Distinguished University Professor in the Department of Biostatistics, Bioinformatics, and Epidemiology at the Medical University of South Carolina. He also holds an appointment as clinical professor in the Department of Radiology at the University of South Carolina School of Medicine. His research interests are in environmental causes of cancer, risk-assessment models, and epidemiology. Dr. Hoel was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1988 and was named a national associate of the National Academies in 2001. He received his PhD in statistics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


Loren D. Koller is an independent consultant and former professor and dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine at Oregon State University. His expertise is in pathology, toxicology, immunotoxicology, carcinogenesis, and risk assessment. He is a former member of the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology and of several of its subcommittees, including the Subcommittee on Immunotoxicity and the Subcommittee on Zinc Cadmium Sulfide. He serves on the Committee to Review Chemical Agent Secondary Waste Disposal and Regulatory Requirements. He received his DVM from Washington State University and his PhD in pathology from the University of Wisconsin.


David Kriebel is a professor of epidemiology in the Department of Work Environment at the University of Massachusetts Lowell and codirector of the Lowell Center for Sustainable Production. His research interests are in the epidemiology of cancer, nonmalignant respiratory disease, and workplace injury. He has conducted research on human exposure to asbestos, beryllium, formaldehyde, metal-working fluids, and other environmental and occupational substances. Dr. Kriebel also conducts research on epidemiologic methods aimed particularly at improving the use of quantitative exposure data in epidemiology through biologically based dosimetric models. With Harvey Checkoway and Neil Pearce, he is a coauthor of the leading textbook of occupational epidemiology, Research Methods in Occupational Epidemiology. He served on two Institute of Medicine committees that evaluated the health effects of exposure to herbicides in Vietnam veterans. He received his ScM in physiology and ScD in epidemiology and occupational health from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographic Information on the Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures." National Research Council. 2007. Health Effects of Beryllium Exposure: A Literature Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12007.
×

Michael J. McCabe, Jr. is an associate professor in the Department of Environmental Medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. He is also director of the Immunomodulators and Immunopathogenesis Program at the university’s Environmental Health Sciences Center. His research interests are in the mechanisms of immunomodulation by metals. The central theme of his research is the cellular and biochemical-molecular mechanisms that control lymphocyte activation and function. His work focuses on lymphocyte signaling pathways as targets for toxic metals that lead to immunosuppression or to autoimmune disease. Dr. McCabe is a past president of the Metals Specialty Section of the Society of Toxicology and was formerly a councilor of the Immunotoxicology Specialty Section. He received his MS and PhD in microbiology and immunology from Albany Medical College.


Carrie A. Redlich is a professor of medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine in pulmonary and critical-care medicine and occupational and environmental medicine and is associate director of the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program. She is also a staff physician at Yale-New Haven Hospital and West Haven Veterans Administration Hospital. Her research interests are in occupational and environmental lung diseases with a focus on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and prevention of asthma due to isocyanate exposure. Dr. Redlich was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Gulf War and Health: Review of the Literature on Pesticides and Solvents. She received her MD from the Yale University School of Medicine and her MPH in environmental health from the Yale University School of Public Health.


Rosalind A. Schoof is a consultant in toxicology and risk assessment with Integral Consulting, Inc. She is a board-certified toxicologist with more than 25 years of experience in conducting evaluations of chemical toxicity, health risk assessments for cancer and noncancer end points, and multimedia assessments of exposure to chemicals for diverse mining and mineral-processing sites, manufacturing sites, landfills, incinerators, and other sources of exposure. Dr. Schoof's research interests include the bioavailability of arsenic and metals in soils and dietary exposure to arsenic and metals. She has served on numerous peer-review panels for U.S. agencies and Canadian ministries and has been a member of several National Research Council committees, including the Subcommittee on Toxicological Risks to Deployed Military Personnel. Dr. Schoof received her PhD in toxicology from the University of Cincinnati.


Nancy L. Sprince is a professor in the Department of Occupational and Environmental Health at the University of Iowa and director of the Heartland Center for Occupational Health and Safety, an education and research center funded by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Her research interests are in the epidemiology of occupational lung disorders in workers exposed to pulmonary toxins and prevention of occupational and agricultural injuries. From 1978 to 1990, Dr. Sprince was director of the Beryllium Case Registry at Massachusetts General Hospital. She served on the Institute of Medicine Committee to Review the Health Effects in Vietnam Veterans of Exposure to Herbicides. She received her MD from the Boston University School of Medicine and her MPH in occupational and environmental medicine from the Harvard School of Public Health.


Susan M. Tarlo is a professor in the Department of Medicine and in the Department of Public Health Sciences at the University of Toronto. She is also a respiratory physician at the University Health Network, Toronto Western Hospital, and at the Gage Occupational and Environmental Health Unit of St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto. Her research interests are in occupational and environmental lung diseases and allergic responses, especially occupational asthma. Dr. Tarlo received her MB, BS (MD equivalent) from London University.


Laura S. Welch is medical director of the Center to Protect Workers’ Rights, a research institute devoted to improving health and safety in the construction industry. Her research interests are in asbestos-related diseases and other occupational lung diseases and musculoskeletal disorders. She is also a lecturer in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographic Information on the Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures." National Research Council. 2007. Health Effects of Beryllium Exposure: A Literature Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12007.
×

environmental and occupational health at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. She has held faculty positions at the university’s medical school and at the Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. Welch received her MD from the State University of New York at Stony Brook and is board-certified in internal medicine and in occupational medicine. She was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Gulf War and Health: Review of the Literature on Pesticides and Solvents.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographic Information on the Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures." National Research Council. 2007. Health Effects of Beryllium Exposure: A Literature Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12007.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographic Information on the Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures." National Research Council. 2007. Health Effects of Beryllium Exposure: A Literature Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12007.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographic Information on the Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures." National Research Council. 2007. Health Effects of Beryllium Exposure: A Literature Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12007.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographic Information on the Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures." National Research Council. 2007. Health Effects of Beryllium Exposure: A Literature Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12007.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographic Information on the Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures." National Research Council. 2007. Health Effects of Beryllium Exposure: A Literature Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12007.
×
Page89
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Biographic Information on the Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures." National Research Council. 2007. Health Effects of Beryllium Exposure: A Literature Review. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12007.
×
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Health Effects of Beryllium Exposure: A Literature Review Get This Book
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Beryllium is an important metal that is used in a number of industries—including the defense, aerospace, automotive, medical, and electronics industries—because of its exceptional strength, stability, and heat-absorbing capability. It is found in a variety of technologies, including nuclear devices, satellite systems, missile systems, radar systems, bushings and bearings in aircraft and heavy machinery, x-ray machines used for mammography, cellular telephone components, computer components, and connectors for fiber optics. To help determine the steps necessary to protect its workforce from the adverse effects of exposure to beryllium used in military aerospace applications, the U.S. Air Force requested that the National Research Council's Committee on Toxicology (COT) conduct an independent evaluation of the scientific literature on beryllium, provide risk estimates for cancer and noncancer health end points, and make recommendations about specific tests for surveillance and biomonitoring of workers.

The request specified that two reports be produced to accomplish those tasks. The first is to provide a review of the scientific literature on beryllium, and the second will expand more critically on the review in considering the maximum chronic inhalation exposure levels that are unlikely to produce adverse health effects, in estimating carcinogenic risks, and in providing guidance on testing methods for surveillance and monitoring of worker populations and other specific issues detailed in the statement of task. In response to the U.S. Air Force request, COT convened the Committee on Beryllium Alloy Exposures, which prepared this first report. Health Effects of Beryllium Exposure : A Literature Review identifies the available toxicologic, epidemiologic, and other literature on beryllium that is most relevant for addressing the statement of task, focusing primarily on beryllium sensitization, CBD, and cancer.

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