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Terrorism and the Electric Power Delivery System (2012)

Chapter:Appendix C: List of Presentations and Committee Meetings

« Previous: Appendix B: Committee Biographical Information
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: List of Presentations and Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2012. Terrorism and the Electric Power Delivery System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12050.
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C

List of Presentations and Committee Meetings

1. Committee Meeting, The National Academies, Washington,
D.C.
August 15–6, 2005

Overview of DHS T&D Security Activities and Study Expectations

William Rees Jr., U.S. Department of Homeland Security

Department of Energy Perspective

David Meyer, U.S. Department of Energy

EPRI’s T&D Security Work

Robert Schainker, Electric Power Research Institute

Progress on Security Issues at NERC

Michehl R. Gent, North American Electric Reliability Council

An ISO Perspective

Tom Bowe, PJM Interconnection

2. Committee Meeting, The National Academies, Washington, D.C.
November 29–0, 2005

Recent NYC Emergency Operations

Lou Rana, Consolidated Edison Company of New York

Recent Emergency Experiences from the Mid-South

William Ball, Southern Company Services

TVA’s Program in Reliability

David Hall, Tennessee Valley Authority

U.S.-Canadian Blackout—the Full Story

Dave Nevius, North American Electric Reliability Council

INL’s Security Work

Julio Rodriguez, Idaho National Laboratory

Department of Energy Perspective

William Parks, U.S. Department of Energy

3. Committee Meeting, The National Academies, Washington, D.C.
February 2-3 2006

Protecting Electric Power Systems Against Terrorist Attack

Edward V. Badolato, Integrated Infrastructure Analytics Inc.

Distributed Generation: A Local Solution to a National Challenge

Bruce A. Hedman, Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc.

Securing Communications to SCADA Systems

Scott Mix, KEMA Inc.

Grid Vulnerability in Remote Configuration of Generation Controllers: The Threat of Hacking with Megawatts

Christopher L. DeMarco, University of Wisconsin-Madison

The NEMA Perspective

John Caskey, National Electrical Manufacturers Association

Transformer Security Issues

James Fama, Edison Electric Institute

Informal Presentation: The Transfer Issue

David K. Owens, Edison Electric Institute

Cyber Security of Industrial Control Systems and Potential Impacts on the Electric Grid

Joseph Weiss, KEMA Inc. (via telephone)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: List of Presentations and Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2012. Terrorism and the Electric Power Delivery System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12050.
×

4. Committee Meeting, Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center, Irvine, California
April 20–21, 2006

Computer/Network Security and Group Communication

Gene Tsudik, University of California, Irvine

Distributed and Emergency Generation: The Caterpillar Perspective
Joseph Fiorito, Caterpillar Inc.

Galvin Architecture

Clark Gellings, Electric Power Research Institute

The California ISO Perspective

David Hawkins, California ISO

5. Closed Committee Meeting, J. Erik Jonnson Woods Hole Center, Woods Hole, Massachusetts
July 24–5, 2006

6. Closed Committee Meeting, The National Academies, Washington, D.C.
October 1–2, 2006

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: List of Presentations and Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2012. Terrorism and the Electric Power Delivery System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12050.
×
Page124
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: List of Presentations and Committee Meetings." National Research Council. 2012. Terrorism and the Electric Power Delivery System. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12050.
×
Page125
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The electric power delivery system that carries electricity from large central generators to customers could be severely damaged by a small number of well-informed attackers. The system is inherently vulnerable because transmission lines may span hundreds of miles, and many key facilities are unguarded. This vulnerability is exacerbated by the fact that the power grid, most of which was originally designed to meet the needs of individual vertically integrated utilities, is being used to move power between regions to support the needs of competitive markets for power generation. Primarily because of ambiguities introduced as a result of recent restricting the of the industry and cost pressures from consumers and regulators, investment to strengthen and upgrade the grid has lagged, with the result that many parts of the bulk high-voltage system are heavily stressed.

Electric systems are not designed to withstand or quickly recover from damage inflicted simultaneously on multiple components. Such an attack could be carried out by knowledgeable attackers with little risk of detection or interdiction. Further well-planned and coordinated attacks by terrorists could leave the electric power system in a large region of the country at least partially disabled for a very long time. Although there are many examples of terrorist and military attacks on power systems elsewhere in the world, at the time of this study international terrorists have shown limited interest in attacking the U.S. power grid. However, that should not be a basis for complacency. Because all parts of the economy, as well as human health and welfare, depend on electricity, the results could be devastating.

Terrorism and the Electric Power Delivery System focuses on measures that could make the power delivery system less vulnerable to attacks, restore power faster after an attack, and make critical services less vulnerable while the delivery of conventional electric power has been disrupted.

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