National Academies Press: OpenBook

Initial Guidance for an Update of the National Vaccine Plan: A Letter Report to the National Vaccine Program Office (2008)

Chapter:Appendix D 1994 National Vaccine Plan Goals, Objectives, and Anticipated Outcomes

« Previous: Appendix C Meeting One Agenda
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D 1994 National Vaccine Plan Goals, Objectives, and Anticipated Outcomes." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Initial Guidance for an Update of the National Vaccine Plan: A Letter Report to the National Vaccine Program Office. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12257.
×
Page26
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D 1994 National Vaccine Plan Goals, Objectives, and Anticipated Outcomes." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Initial Guidance for an Update of the National Vaccine Plan: A Letter Report to the National Vaccine Program Office. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12257.
×
Page27
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D 1994 National Vaccine Plan Goals, Objectives, and Anticipated Outcomes." Institute of Medicine. 2008. Initial Guidance for an Update of the National Vaccine Plan: A Letter Report to the National Vaccine Program Office. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12257.
×
Page28

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Appendix D 1994 National Vaccine Plan Goals, Objectives, and Anticipated Outcomes GOALS 1. Develop new and 2. Ensure the optimal 3. Better educate the 4. Achieve better use of improved vaccines safety and effectiveness of public and members of the existing vaccines to vaccines and health professions on the prevent disease, disability, immunizations benefits and risks of and death immunizations OBJECTIVES 1.1 Develop new and 2.1 Enhance the ability to 3.1 Increase public 4.1 Ensure an adequate improved vaccines for evaluate the safety and demand for immunization, supply of vaccines priority diseases effectiveness of vaccines especially among populations at risk of underimmunization 1.2 Ensure the Nation’s 2.2 Improve the 3.2 Improve the 4.2 Increase immunization capability to detect and surveillance and evaluation immunization practices of coverage levels for infants respond effectively to new of adverse events all health care providers and children and emerging diseases in following vaccination the United States and abroad 1.3 Enhance the process 2.3 Ensure the optimal use 3.3. Increase the 4.3 Maintain of translating technologic of vaccines awareness of the benefits immunization coverage innovations into new of immunization among levels for school-aged vaccines special target audiences children (third-party payers, employers, legislators, community leaders, hospital administrators, etc.) 26

APPENDIX D 27 1.4 Ensure the Nation’s 2.4 Continue to ensure 3.4 Develop more 4.4 Increase immunization capability to evaluate new fair and efficient effective methods of coverage levels among vaccines, and to conduct compensation to communicating the older adolescents, adults, prompt reviews of new individuals injured by benefits and risks of and the elderly and improved candidate vaccines immunization to health vaccines care providers, patients, and parents/guardians 1.5 Promote the 2.5 Promote and support 3.5 Continue to evaluate 4.5 Improve the improvement of existing the efforts of the World the benefits and impact of surveillance of vaccine vaccines and development Health Organization to immunization through the preventable diseases to of new vaccines ad develop and harmonize use of cost-effectiveness assess the impact of vaccine-related international standards and studies immunization programs technologies for other improve regulatory diseases of importance in capabilities in countries developing countries involved in vaccine production 4.6 Establish registry and immunization tracking systems 4.7 Enhance immunization coverage to strengthen national defense 4.8 Enhance immunization coverage of international travelers who are of highest risk of acquiring vaccine- preventable diseases 4.9 Eradicate poliomyelitis globally 4.10 Promote better control of neonatal tetanus and measles, worldwide 4.11 Promote the self- sustaining capacity of immunization programs in developing countries ANTICIPATED15 OUTCOMES Provision of adequate resources to make possible the vigorous and comprehensive pursuit of the wide range of activities outlined in the National Vaccine Plan could result in substantial health benefits for the American people by the year 2000. These benefits are expected to be realized as the following outcomes: 15 Also described as “predicted” outcomes in the National Vaccine Plan

28 INITIAL GUIDANCE • Age-appropriate immunization with all recommended vaccines will be extended to at least 90 percent of infants and children, and access to affordable vaccination services will be made available for every person in the United States. • Diphtheria, tetanus, poliomyelitis, measles, rubella, mumps, some forms of hepatitis, pertussis (whooping cough), and bacterial meningitis (from Haemophilus influenzae type b) will be essentially eliminated as significant causes of death, disease, and disability in the United States. • Educational communication networks will be in place that will inform all health care providers, communities, and families of the benefits and risks of vaccination. • In a global context, polio will be drastically reduced, if not eliminated, and neonatal tetanus and measles will be better controlled. • Pneumococcal pneumonia and influenza in American adults over the age of 65 will be significantly reduced. • A nationwide system will monitor the vaccines that children receive, and will remind parents when individual infants and children should be vaccinated. • A nationwide surveillance system will report and investigate cases of vaccine- preventable diseases. • Vaccine safety and efficacy will be continuously monitored, and adverse events following immunization will be reported and carefully analyzed. • Improved vaccines will replace some of the vaccines in current use. • Some vaccines requiring multiple doses and multiple contacts with the health care system will be replaced by more cost-effective ones that will improve people’s access to immunization. • Many new vaccines will be developed, or be much closer to licensure, for diseases for which effective vaccines do not now exist. • New mechanisms for the more rapid assessment of vaccines proposed for licensure will be in place. • A reliable supply of all recommended vaccines and a capability to respond to emergencies and emergent threats to public health will be achieved and sustained. • Information on the cost and benefits of the National Vaccine Plan will be made available on an ongoing basis to the American people.

Initial Guidance for an Update of the National Vaccine Plan: A Letter Report to the National Vaccine Program Office Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $21.00 Buy Ebook | $16.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

This book is the Institute of Medicine's response to the first part of the statement of task asking for a review of the 1994 National Vaccine Plan. The Committee on the Review of Priorities in the National Vaccine Plan reviewed the goals, objectives, strategies, and anticipated outcomes presented in the plan; their findings are contained in this book. In the first section of the book, the committee examines what has changed in the broader social, policy, and economic context of vaccine development and immunization, and highlights several areas where noteworthy progress has been made, particularly by federal agencies. The committee acknowledges that progress in developing and delivering vaccines has benefited from essential contributions by other stakeholders, including researchers, manufacturers, state and local public health agencies, and health care providers. In the second section of the book, the committee uses what it learned from reviewing the 1994 plan and the process of preparing it to distill key elements. Based on these elements, the committee offers guidance to NVPO and its partners on developing the update to the national vaccine plan.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!