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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Contributors." National Research Council. 2009. Emerging Technologies to Benefit Farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12455.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Contributors." National Research Council. 2009. Emerging Technologies to Benefit Farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12455.
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Page264
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Contributors." National Research Council. 2009. Emerging Technologies to Benefit Farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12455.
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Page265
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Contributors." National Research Council. 2009. Emerging Technologies to Benefit Farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12455.
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Appendix D Contributors The Committee on a Study of Technologies to Benefit Farmers in Africa and South Asia and staff appreciate the contributions of several individuals and organizations to the work of the committee. Some of these contribu- tions were in person at an open session of the committee; others occurred later during the data collection and writing. The committee is grateful to the following individuals for sharing their time and expertise: Evangelyn C. Alocilja, Michigan State University Paul Anderson, Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc. Philip Benfey, Duke University Stewart Brand, Global Business Network and the Long Now Foundation Roelof Bruintjes, National Center for Atmospheric Research Hongda Chen, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative State Research Education and Extension Service Roy Curtiss, Arizona State University Marty Dickman, Texas A&M University Ina Dobrinksi, University of Pennsylvania Hans Draayer, Pfizer Jorge Dubcovsky, University of California, Davis Claude Fauquet, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center David Furukawa, Separation Consultants, Inc. Dennis Garrity, World Agroforestry Centre Paul Gilna, California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology Anand Gopal, University of California, Berkeley 263

264 Appendix D William Gordon-Kamm, Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc. Ronnie Green, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service Anthony Hall, University of California, Riverside Debora Hamernik, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Cooperative State Research Education and Extension Service Jo Handelsman, University of Wisconsin, Madison Hans Herren, Millennium Institute Willem Janssen, The World Bank Dan Kammen, University of California, Berkeley Harry Klee, University of Florida Peter Kofinas, University of Maryland Raoul Kopelman, University of Michigan Raja Krishnan, Pfizer Michael R. Ladisch, Purdue University Brian Larkins, The University of Arizona Jan Leach, Colorado State University Michael T. Lesnick, Meridian Institute Harris Lewin, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Raul Lobo, University of Delaware Stephen Long, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Garrick Louis, University of Virginia John Mankins, ������������������������������������������� ARTEMIS Innovation Management Solutions LLC Terry McElwain, Washington State University Vijay Modi, Columbia University John Mullet, Texas A&M University Alexandra Navrotsky, University of California, Davis Charles Nicholson, Cornell University Dev Niyogi, Purdue University Arthur Nozik, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Guy Palmer, Washington State University Eija Pehu, The World Bank Scott Phillips, Harvard University Daniel Pomp, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Daphne Preuss, Chromatin, Inc. Rex R. Raimond, Meridian Institute Bill Raun, Oklahoma State University Jess D. Reed, University of Wisconsin-Madison Jayne Robinson, University of Dayton Albert Sacco, Jr., Northeastern University Pedro Sanchez, The Earth Institute at Columbia University Richard Sayre, Ohio State University Joel Schindall, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Appendix D 265 Patrick Schnable, Iowa State University R. Paul Schreiner, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Corvallis, Oregon Dale Shaner, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service Chandra Shekhar, University of Maryland Donald Slack, University of Arizona John B. Solie, Oklahoma State University Marvin Stone, Oklahoma State University Mike Sussman, University of Wisconsin-Madison Bob Thresher, National Renewable Energy Laboratory K. C. Ting, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Michael S. Tomczyk, University of Pennsylvania Eric Triplett, University of Florida Vicki Vance, National Science Foundation Curt Van Tassell, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service Wim Vermaas, Arizona State University Wes Wallender, University of California, Davis Jochen Weiss, University of Massachusetts Kevin Wells, University of Missouri-Columbia Bryan White, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Martin Wiedmann, Cornell University James Womack, Texas A&M University Tilahun Yilma, University of California, Davis Vidadi Yusibov, Fraunhofer USA Center for Molecular Biotechnology James Zhang, Mendel Biotechnology Jian-Kang Zhu, University of California, Riverside

Next: Appendix E: Recent Publications of the Board on Agriculture and Natural Resources »
Emerging Technologies to Benefit Farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia Get This Book
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Increased agricultural productivity is a major stepping stone on the path out of poverty in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, but farmers there face tremendous challenges improving production. Poor soil, inefficient water use, and a lack of access to plant breeding resources, nutritious animal feed, high quality seed, and fuel and electricity-combined with some of the most extreme environmental conditions on Earth-have made yields in crop and animal production far lower in these regions than world averages.

Emerging Technologies to Benefit Farmers in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia identifies sixty emerging technologies with the potential to significantly improve agricultural productivity in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. Eighteen technologies are recommended for immediate development or further exploration. Scientists from all backgrounds have an opportunity to become involved in bringing these and other technologies to fruition. The opportunities suggested in this book offer new approaches that can synergize with each other and with many other activities to transform agriculture in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.

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