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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
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Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis

Workshop Summary

Elizabeth Haytmanek and Katherine McClure, Rapporteurs

Board on Global Health

Food and Nutrition Board

INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS

Washington, D.C.
www.nap.edu

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
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THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS

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NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine.

This study was supported by Grant No. 51649 between the National Academy of Sciences and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, with additional support from the PepsiCo Foundation. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the organizations or agencies that provided support for this project.

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Suggested citation: IOM (Institute of Medicine). 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
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“Knowing is not enough; we must apply.

Willing is not enough; we must do.”

—Goethe

INSTITIUTE OF MEDICINE OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES


Advising the Nation. Improving Health.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
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THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

Advisers to the Nation on Science, Engineering, and Medicine


The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone is president of the National Academy of Sciences.


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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
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PLANNING COMMITTEE ON MITIGATING THE NUTRITIONAL IMPACTS OF THE GLOBAL FOOD PRICE CRISIS1

REYNALDO MARTORELL (Chair), Robert W. Woodruff Professor,

International Nutrition;

Senior Advisor,

Global Health Institute, Hubert Department of Global Health, The Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia

HANS HERREN, President,

Millennium Institute, Arlington, Virginia

ISATOU JALLOW, Chief,

Women, Children and Gender Policy, UN World Food Program, Rome, Italy

RUTH K. ONIANG’O, Executive Director,

Rural Outreach Program, Nairobi, Kenya

PER PINSTRUP-ANDERSEN, H.E. Babcock Professor of Food, Nutrition and Public Policy,

Cornell University, Ithaca, New York

JUAN A. RIVERA, Director,

Center for Research in Nutrition and Health, National Institute of Public Health, Mexico;

Professor,

Nutrition, School of Public Health, Cuernavaca, Mexico

RICARDO UAUY, Professor,

Nutrition and Pediatrics, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile

KEITH P. WEST, JR., Professor,

International Nutrition, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland

Study Staff

ELIZABETH HAYTMANEK, Study Director

KATHERINE MCCLURE, Senior Program Associate

GUI LIU, Senior Program Assistant

MEGAN PEREZ, Intern

JULIE WILTSHIRE, Financial Officer

PATRICK KELLEY, Director,

Board on Global Health

LINDA D. MEYERS, Director,

Food and Nutrition Board

1

IOM planning committees are solely responsible for organizing the workshop, identifying topics, and choosing speakers. The responsibility for the published workshop summary rests with the workshop rapporteurs and the institution. The planning committee’s role was limited to planning the workshop, and the workshop summary has been prepared by the workshop rapporteurs as a factual summary of what occurred at the workshop.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
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Reviewers

This report has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the National Research Council’s Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the process. We wish to thank the following individuals for their review of this report:

Eileen Kennedy, Tufts University Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy

Vivica Kraak, Save the Children

Per Pinstrup-Andersen, Cornell University

Meera Shekar, The World Bank

Although the reviewers listed above have provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the final draft of the report before its release. The review of this report was overseen by Hugh Tilson, University of North Carolina, Gillings School of Global Public Health. Appointed by the Institute of Medicine, he was responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this report rests entirely with the authors and the institution.

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4

 

RESPONDING TO THE CRISES AT THE COUNTRY LEVEL

 

49

   

 The Role of Ministries in Responding to the Crises at the Country Level,
Ruth Oniang’o

 

49

   

 Review of National Responses to the Food Crisis,
Hafez Ghanem

 

51

   

 The Case of Mexico,
Graciela Teruel Belismelis

 

55

   

 The Global Food Price Crisis and Food Development Strategy in China,
Fangquan Mei

 

57

   

 Food Prices, Consumption, and Nutrition in Ethiopia: Implications of Recent Price Shocks,
Paul Dorosh

 

60

   

 Bangladesh Case Study,
Josephine Iziku Ippe

 

66

   

 Discussion,

 

71

   

 References,

 

72

5

 

A ROLE FOR NUTRITION SURVEILLANCE IN ADDRESSING THE GLOBAL FOOD CRISIS

 

75

   

 Nutrition Surveillance in Relation to the Food Price and Economic Crises,
John Mason

 

76

   

 Insights from 25 Years of Helen Keller International’s Nutrition Surveillance in Bangladesh and Indonesia,
Andrew Thorne-Lyman

 

82

   

 Famine Early Warning Systems Network, Nutrition Surveillance, and Early Warning,
Chris Hillbruner

 

85

   

 Listening Posts Project: A Concept for a Real-Time Surveillance System Nested Within a Program,
Anna Taylor

 

88

   

 Food Security, Nutrition Monitoring, and the Global Food Price Crisis: USAID/FFP Title II Programs,
Ellen Mathys

 

91

   

 Discussion,

 

95

   

 References,

 

96

6

 

THE GLOBAL RESPONSE TO THE CRISES

 

99

   

 Introduction to the Global Nutrition Landscape,
Ruth Levine

 

99

   

 The Role and Capacity of Foundations in Responding to the Crises,
Haddis Tadesse

 

106

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Mitigating the Nutritional Impacts of the Global Food Price Crisis: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12698.
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 The Role of Food Companies in Responding to the Crises,
Derek Yach

 

110

   

 The Advocacy Role of Civil Society Organizations in Responding to the Economic and Food Price Crises,
Asma Lateef

 

114

   

 The Role and Capacity of Civil Society in Responding to the Crises,
Tom Arnold

 

116

   

 Mitigating the Nutritional Impact of the Global Food Security Crisis: The Role and Capacity of UN Agencies in Response to the Crisis,
David Nabarro

 

118

   

 The Role and Capacity of UNICEF in Responding to the Crises,
Werner Schultink

 

123

   

 The Role and Capacity of the WFP in Responding to the Crises,
Martin Bloem

 

125

   

 The Role and Capacity of FAO in Responding to the Crises,
Hafez Ghanem

 

127

   

 The Role and Capacity of WHO in Responding to the Crises,
Francesco Branca

 

129

   

 Discussion,

 

131

   

 References,

 

133

7

 

U.S. POLICY IN FOOD AND NUTRITION

 

135

   

 The Roadmap to End Global Hunger,
James McGovern

 

135

   

 USAID’s Response to the Food Crisis and Preventing Malnutrition for the Future,
Michael Zeilinger

 

140

   

 Food Security in the 21st Century,
Nina Fedoroff

 

145

   

 USDA’s Response to the Crises and Future Perspectives,
Rajiv Shah

 

147

   

 Renewing American Leadership in the Fight Against Global Hunger and Poverty,
Catherine Bertini and Dan Glickman

 

151

   

 Discussion,

 

155

   

 Workshop Closing Remarks,
Reynaldo Martorell

 

156

   

 References,

 

158

 

 

APPENDIXES

 

 

A

 

Workshop Agenda

 

159

B

 

Speaker Biographies

 

165

C

 

Workshop Registrants

 

183

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In 2007 and 2008, the world witnessed a dramatic increase in food prices. The global financial crisis that began in 2008 compounded the burden of high food prices, exacerbating the problems of hunger and malnutrition in developing countries. The tandem food price and economic crises struck amidst the massive, chronic problem of hunger and undernutrition in developing countries. National governments and international actors have taken a variety of steps to mitigate the negative effects of increased food prices on particular groups. The recent abrupt increase in food prices, in tandem with the current global economic crisis, threatens progress already made in these areas, and could inhibit future efforts.

The Institute of Medicine held a workshop, summarized in this volume, to describe the dynamic technological, agricultural, and economic issues contributing to the food price increases of 2007 and 2008 and their impacts on health and nutrition in resource-poor regions. The compounding effects of the current global economic downturn on nutrition motivated additional discussions on these dual crises, their impacts on the nutritional status of vulnerable populations, and opportunities to mitigate their negative nutritional effects.

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