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Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2009. Advancing the Competitiveness and Efficiency of the U.S. Construction Industry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12717.
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Page 41
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2009. Advancing the Competitiveness and Efficiency of the U.S. Construction Industry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12717.
×
Page 42
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2009. Advancing the Competitiveness and Efficiency of the U.S. Construction Industry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12717.
×
Page 43
Suggested Citation:"References." National Research Council. 2009. Advancing the Competitiveness and Efficiency of the U.S. Construction Industry. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12717.
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Page 44

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References ACEC (American Council of Engineering Companies). 2009. ACEC Web site. Available at http://www.acec.org. Accessed June 17, 2009. AGC (Associated General Contractors of America). 2009. AGC Web site. Available at http://www.agc.org. Accessed April 2, 2009. BEA (Bureau of Economic Analysis). 2009. Gross Domestic Product by Industry Accounts. Available at http://www.bea.gov/industry/gpotables/gpo_action.cfm?anon=95848&table_id=24547&format_t ype=0. Accessed April 30, 2009. BLS (Bureau of Labor Statistics). 2007. Employment Projections: Employment by Major Industry Sector. Available at http://data.bls.gov/cgi-bin/print.pl/emp/empmajorindustry.htm. Accessed January 28, 2009. BLS. 2008. Employed Persons in Nonagricultural Industries by Sex and Class of Worker. Available at http://www.bls.gov/cps/cpsaat16.pdf. Accessed February 4, 2009. BRT (Business Roundtable). 1983. More Construction for the Money: Summary Report of the Construction Industry Cost Effectiveness Project. Available at http://www.ce.berkeley.edu/ ~tommelein/BRTMoreConstructionForTheMoney.pdf. Accessed July 10, 2008. BRT. 1997. Confronting the Skilled Construction Work Force Shortage: A Blueprint for the Future. Construction Cost Effectiveness Task Force. Washington, D.C.: BRT. CERF (Civil Engineering Research Foundation). 1994. A Nationwide Survey of Civil Engineering- Related R&D. CERF Report #93-5006. Reston, Va.: American Society of Civil Engineers. CII (Construction Industry Institute). 2002. Preliminary Research on Prefabrication, Pre-Assembly, Modularization, and Off-Site Fabrication in Construction. Available at smartech.gatech.edu/ dspace/bitstream/1853/10883/1/E-20-G08_734308.pdf. Accessed April 2, 2009. CII. 2006. Front-End Planning: Break the Rules, Pay the Price. Research Summary 213.1. University of Texas at Austin. CII. 2009. The CII Web site. Available at https://www.construction-institute.org/scriptcontent/. Accessed April 2, 2009. CII. Forthcoming. Enhancing Innovation in the EPC Industry: A White Paper. CII RT 243. CPWR (CPWR: The Center for Construction Research and Training). 2007. The Construction Chart Book: The U.S. Construction Industry and Its Workers. 4th ed. Silver Spring, Md.: CPWR. CURT (Construction Users Roundtable). 2007. Pre-Assembly Perks: Discover why modularization works. The Voice. Fall issue. Pages 28-31. Cincinnati, Ohio: CURT. CURT. 2009. CURT Web site. Available at http://www.curt.org. Accessed February 4, 2009. EPA (Environmental Protection Agency). 2004. Buildings and the Environment: A Statistical Summary. Available at http://www.epa.gov/greenbuilding/pubs/gbstats.pdf. Accessed March 28, 2009. FFC (Federal Facilities Council). 2003. Starting Smart: Key Practices for Developing Scopes of Work for Facilities Projects. Federal Facilities Council Technical Report No. 146. Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press. FFC. 2007. Reducing Construction Costs: Uses of Best Dispute Resolution Practices by Project Owners. Proceedings Report. Federal Facilities Council Technical Report No. 149. Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press. Global Insight. 2007. Global Construction Outlook. Lexington, Mass: IHS Global Insight, Inc. 41

42 ADVANCING THE COMPETITIVENESS AND EFFICIENCY OF THE U.S. CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY Goodrum, P., and C. Haas. 2002. Partial factor productivity and equipment technology change at the activity level in the U.S. construction industry. ASCE Journal of Construction Engineering and Management 128(6):463-472. Goodrum, P., D. Zhai, and M. Yasin. 2008. The relationship between changes in material technology and construction productivity. ASCE Journal of Construction Engineering and Management 135(4):278-287. Grau, D., C. Caldas, C. Haas, P. Goodrum, and J. Gong. 2009. Assessing the impact of materials tracking technologies on construction craft productivity. Journal of Automation in Construction. Elsevier Press. Available at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science?_ob=ArticleURL&_udi=B6V20- 4WCSYW1-1&_user=1091021&_rdoc=1&_fmt=&_orig=search&_sort=d&_docanchor=&view= c&_acct=C000051513&_version=1&_urlVersion=0&_userid=1091021&md5=c7b3c1219833816 b29539d592f83a360. Harrison, P. 2007. Can Measurement Error Explain the Weaknesses of Productivity Growth in the Canadian Construction Industry? Centre for the Study of Living Standards, Research Report No. 2007-01. Ottawa, Ontario. Available at http://www.csls.ca/reports/csls2007-01.PDF. Accessed March 28, 2009. Haskell, P.H. 2004. Construction Industry Productivity: Its History and Future Direction. Available at http://www.thehaskellco.com/upload/NewsLibrary/WhitePapers/ConstructionProductivity.pdf. Accessed January 5, 2009. Hinze, J.W. 2001. Construction Contracts. New York City: McGraw-Hill Construction. Jones, S. 2009. Introduction to BIM: SmartMarket Report Special Section. Pages 21-24 in Building Information Modeling (BIM): Transforming Design and Construction to Achieve Greater Industry Productivity. New York City: McGraw-Hill Construction. Los Alamos National Laboratory. 2009. Technology Readiness Levels. Available at http://www.lanl.gov/ orgs/tt/arpa-e/pdf/TRL_definitions.pdf. Accessed June 30, 2009. Mankins, J.C. 1995. Technology Readiness Levels: A White Paper. Available at http://www.hq.nasa.gov/ office/codeq/trl/trl.pdf. Accessed June 30, 2009. McGraw-Hill Construction. 2008. Key Trends in the European and U.S. Construction Marketplace. SmartMarket Report. New York City: McGraw-Hill Construction. NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology). 2004. Cost Analysis of Inadequate Interoperability in the U.S. Capital Facilities Industry. NIST GCR 04-867. Gaithersburg, Md.: NIST. NIST. 2009. NIST Web site. Available at http://www.nist.gov. Accessed January 9, 2009. NRC (National Research Council). 1986. Construction Productivity: Proposed Actions by the Federal Government to Promote Increased Efficiency in Construction. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. NRC. 2000. Outsourcing Management Functions for the Acquisition of Federal Facilities. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. NRC. 2009. Construction Research at NIOSH. Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press. NSF (National Science Foundation). 2008. Expenditures for U.S. Industrial R&D Continue to Increase in 2005. R&D Performance Geographically Concentrated. Available at http://www.nsf.gov/ statistics/infbrief/nsf07335/ Accessed March 28, 2009. NSF. 2009. The National Science Foundation Web site. Available at http://www.nsf.gov. Accessed April 2, 2009. NSTC (National Science and Technology Council). 1995. Construction and Building: Federal Research and Development in Support of the U.S. Construction Industry. Washington, D.C.: NSTC. NSTC. 2008. Federal Research and Development Agenda for Net-Zero Energy, High-Performance Green Buildings. Washington, D.C.: NSTC. Purdue University. 2009. Design Practices to Facilitate Construction Automation. Available at http://rebar.ecn.purdue.edu/ECT/PT183/index.aspx. Accessed April 2, 2009.

REFERENCES 43 Teicholz, P. 2004. Labor productivity declines in the construction industry: causes and remedies. AECbytes Viewpoint, Issue 4, April 14. Thomas, H.R. 2008. Improving Construction Labor Productivity on Mid-Sized Projects. Presentation at Workshop on Advancing the Productivity and Competitiveness of the U.S. Construction Industry. November 19, 2008. Washington, D.C. Triplett, J., and B. Bosworth. 2004. Productivity in the U.S. Services Sector: New Sources of Economic Growth. Washington, D.C.: Brookings Institution Press. Tulacz, G., and T. Armistead. 2007. Large corporations are attempting to meet the industry halfway on issues of staff shortages and risk. Engineering News Record, November 26. U.S. Census Bureau. 2005. Nonemployer Statistics and Construction Spending. Available at http://www.census.gov/epcd/nonemployer/2005/us/US000_23.htm and http://www.census.gov/const/C30/ototsa2005.pdf. Accessed September 15, 2008. U.S. Census Bureau. 2008a. Value of Construction Put in Place: 1980 to 2006. Available at http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/2008/tables/08s0928.pdf. Accessed April 29, 2009. U.S. Census Bureau. 2008b. Construction—Establishments, Employees, and Payroll by Kind of Business (NAICS Basis): 2004 and 2005. Available at http://www.census.gov/compendia/statab/tables/ 09s0919.pdf. Accessed April 29, 2009. U.S. DOC (U.S. Department of Commerce). 2008. Statistical Abstract of the United States: 2008. Washington, D.C.

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Construction productivity—how well, how quickly, and at what cost buildings and infrastructure can be constructed—directly affects prices for homes and consumer goods and the robustness of the national economy. Industry analysts differ on whether construction industry productivity is improving or declining. Still, advances in available and emerging technologies offer significant opportunities to improve construction efficiency substantially in the 21st century and to help meet other national challenges, such as environmental sustainability.

Advancing the Competitiveness and Efficiency of the U.S. Construction Industry identifies five interrelated activities that could significantly improve the quality, timeliness, cost-effectiveness, and sustainability of construction projects.

These activities include widespread deployment and use of interoperable technology applications; improved job-site efficiency through more effective interfacing of people, processes, materials, equipment, and information; greater use of prefabrication, preassembly, modularization, and off-site fabrication techniques and processes; innovative, widespread use of demonstration installations; and effective performance measurement to drive efficiency and support innovation. The book recommends that the National Institute of Standards and Technology work with industry leaders to develop a collaborative strategy to fully implement and deploy the five activities

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