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Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership: Third Report (2010)

Chapter: Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2010. Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership: Third Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12939.
×

Appendix F
Acronyms and Abbreviations

ac alternating current

ACEC advanced combustion and emission control (technical team)

ANL Argonne National Laboratory

ARPA-E Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (DOE)

ARRA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

bbl barrel

BES (Office of) Basic Energy Sciences (DOE)

BEV battery electric vehicle

BGY billion gallons per year

BoP balance of plant

C&S codes and standards

CAFE corporate average fuel economy

CCS carbon capture and storage

CEM compressor expander motor

CFD computational fluid dynamics

CLEERS Crosscut Lean Exhaust Emission Reduction Simulation

CNG compressed natural gas

CO carbon monoxide

CO2 carbon dioxide

COE center of excellence

CRADA collaborative research and development agreement

dc direct current

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2010. Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership: Third Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12939.
×

DOE U.S. Department of Energy

DOT U.S. Department of Transportation

DPF diesel particulate filter

E85 85 percent ethanol

EAC Electricity Advisory Committee

EERE (Office of) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE)

EGR exhaust gas recirculation

EIA U.S. Energy Information Administration

EISA Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007

EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

EPRI Electric Power Research Institute

ESG Executive Steering Group

FACE fuels for advanced combustion engines

FCFP FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership

FCHEV fuel cell hybrid electric vehicle

FCT Fuel Cell Technologies (program)

FCVT FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies (program)

FE (Office of) Fossil Energy (DOE)

FFV flexible fuel vehicle

FMEA failure modes and effects analysis

FPITT fuel pathway integration technical team

FTA Federal Transit Administration

FY fiscal year

GaN gallium nitride

gge gallon gasoline equivalent

GHG greenhouse gas

GREET Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (model)

H, H2 hydrogen

H2A Hydrogen Technology (model)

HAMMER Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (facility)

HC hydrocarbon

HCCI homogeneous charge compression ignition

HEV hybrid electric vehicle

HFCIT Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (program)

HFCV hydrogen fuel cell vehicle

HFI Hydrogen Fuels Initiative

HHV higher heating value

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2010. Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership: Third Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12939.
×

HyTrans Hydrogen Transition (model)

ICE internal combustion engine

IEEE Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers

IMEP indicated mean effective pressure

IPM interior permanent magnet

ISO International Organization for Standardization

kg kilogram

kW kilowatt

kWe kilowatt (electric)

kWh kilowatt-hour

Li-ion lithium-ion

LCA life-cycle assessment

LDV light-duty vehicle

LHV lower heating value

LPG liquefied petroleum gas

LTC low-temperature combustion

MARKAL Market Analysis (model)

MEA membrane electrode assembly

MFA materials flow analysis

MOU memorandum of understanding

MPa megapascal

mpg miles per gallon

MSM Macro System Model

MT metric ton

NAE National Academy of Engineering

NAS National Academy of Sciences

NE (Office of) Nuclear Energy (DOE)

NEMS National Energy Modeling System

NERC North American Electric Reliability Corporation

NETL National Energy Technology Laboratory

NFPA National Fire Protection Association

NGNP Next Generation Nuclear Powerplant

NHTSA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

NiMH nickel metal hydride

NIST National Institute of Standards and Technology

NOx nitrogen oxides

NPC National Petroleum Council

NPV net present value

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2010. Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership: Third Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12939.
×

NRC National Research Council

NRDC Natural Resources Defense Council

NREL National Renewable Energy Laboratory

OEM original equipment manufacturer

ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory

PAN polyacrylonitrile

PbA lead acid (battery)

PEM proton exchange membrane

PHEV plug-in hybrid electric vehicle

PHMSA Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration

PM particulate matter

PNGV Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles

PNNL Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

PRD pressure relief device

PSAT Powertrain Systems Analysis Toolkit

R&D research and development

SAE Society of Automotive Engineers

SBIR Small Business Innovation Research

SC (Office of) Science (DOE)

SCR selective catalytic reduction

SiC silicon carbide

SNL Sandia National Laboratories

SOC state of charge

SOI silicon on insulator

SRNL Savannah River National Laboratory

STTR small business technology transfer

SUV sport utility vehicle

21CTP 21st Century Truck Partnership

UPS uninterruptible power supply

USABC United States Advanced Battery Consortium

USCAR U.S. Council for Automotive Research

VSATT vehicle systems analysis technical team

VT Vehicle Technologies (Office of)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2010. Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership: Third Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12939.
×
Page 205
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2010. Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership: Third Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12939.
×
Page 206
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2010. Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership: Third Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12939.
×
Page 207
Suggested Citation:"Appendix F: Acronyms and Abbreviations." National Research Council. 2010. Review of the Research Program of the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership: Third Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12939.
×
Page 208
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The public-private partnership to develop vehicles that require less petroleum-based fuel and emit fewer greenhouse gases should continue to include fuel cells and other hydrogen technologies in its research and development portfolio. The third volume in the FreedomCAR series states that, although the partnership's recent shift of focus toward technologies that could be ready for use in the nearer term—such as advanced combustion engines and plug-in electric vehicles—is warranted, R&D on hydrogen and fuel cells is also needed given the high costs and challenges that many of the technologies must overcome before widespread use.

The FreedomCAR (Cooperative Automotive Research) and Fuel Partnership is a research collaboration among the U.S. Department of Energy, the United States Council for Automotive Research - whose members are the Detroit automakers—five major energy companies, and two electric utility companies. The partnership seeks to advance the technologies essential for components and infrastructure for a full range of affordable, clean, energy efficient cars and light trucks. Until recently, the program primarily focused on developing technologies that would allow U.S. automakers to make production and marketing decisions by 2015 on hydrogen fuel cell-powered vehicles. These vehicles have the potential to be much more energy-efficient than conventional gasoline-powered vehicles, produce no harmful tailpipe emissions, and significantly reduce petroleum use. In 2009, the partnership changed direction and stepped up efforts to advance, in the shorter term, technologies for reducing petroleum use in combustion engines, including those using biofuels, as well as batteries that could be used in plug-in hybrid-electric or all electric vehicles.

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