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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Front-of-Package Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols: Phase I Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12957.
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Appendix D
Workshop Agenda

COMMITTEE ON EXAMINATION OF FRONT-OF-PACKAGE NUTRITION RATING SYSTEMS AND SYMBOLS


April 9, 2010


The National Academy of Sciences Building

2101 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20418

NAS Lecture Room, 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m.

9:00 a.m.

Welcome

 

Ellen Wartella, Committee Chair

Session 1:
International Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols

9:15 a.m.

Front-of-Pack Systems in the United Kingdom

 

Claire Boville, M.B.A., M.Sc., B.Sc. (by telephone)

Deputy Head of Food Composition and Labelling Division

Head of Labelling, Promotions and Dietetic Foods Unit Food Standards Agency

9:45 a.m.

The Choices Program

 

Jacob C. Seidell, Ph.D.

Chairman, International Scientific Program for Choices

Professor of Nutrition and Health

VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

9:55 a.m.

Committee Discussion with Presenters

10:30 a.m.

Break

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Front-of-Package Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols: Phase I Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12957.
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Session 2:
Domestic Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols

10:45 a.m.

The Heart Check Program

 

Kim Stitzel, M.S., R.D.

Director, Nutrition and Obesity

Consumer Health Division

The American Heart Association

10:55 a.m.

The Smart Choices Program

 

Joanne Lupton, Ph.D.

Distinguished Professor

University Faculty Fellow

William W. Allen Endowed Chair in Human Nutrition

Department of Nutrition and Food Science

Texas A&M University

11:05 a.m.

The General Mills Nutrition Highlights and Goodness Corner Programs

 

Kathy Wiemer, M.S., R.D.

Director/Fellow, Regulatory Affairs

General Mills Bell Institute of Health & Nutrition

11:15 a.m.

The ConAgra Start Making Choices Program

 

Mark Andon, Ph.D.

Vice President, Nutrition Research, Quality, and Innovation

ConAgra Foods

11:25 a.m.

The NuVal System

 

David Katz, M.D., M.P.H., FACPM, FACP

Adjunct Associate Professor of Public Health Practice

Director of the Yale Prevention Research Center

Yale University School of Medicine

Chief Science Officer, NuVal LLC

11:35 a.m.

The Nutrient Rich Foods Index

 

Adam Drewnowski, Ph.D.

Director

Center for Obesity Research

University of Washington

11:45 a.m.

The Guiding Stars Program

 

Mark Kantor, Ph.D.

Associate Professor and Extension Specialist

Department of Nutrition and Food Science University of Maryland

11:55 a.m.

Committee Discussion with Presenters

1:00 p.m.

Lunch on Your Own

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Front-of-Package Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols: Phase I Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12957.
×

Session 3:
Concerns About Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols

2:00 p.m.

Perspectives on Front-of-Package Labeling

 

Marion Nestle, Ph.D., M.P. H.

Paulette Goddard Professor

Department of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health

New York University

2:15 p.m.

Committee Discussion with Presenter

2:25 p.m.

Break

Session 4:
FDA Sponsor Perspectives

2:30 p.m.

Update on FDA Front-of-Pack Efforts

Jessica Leighton, Ph.D.

Senior Science Advisor

Office of the Commissioner

Food and Drug Administration

 

Barbara Schneeman, Ph.D.

Director

Office of Nutrition, Labeling and Dietary Supplements

Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition

Food and Drug Administration

Session 5:
Public Comments

3:00 p.m.

Public Comments

4:00 p.m.

Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Front-of-Package Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols: Phase I Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12957.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Front-of-Package Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols: Phase I Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12957.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Front-of-Package Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols: Phase I Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12957.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Front-of-Package Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols: Phase I Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12957.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2010. Front-of-Package Nutrition Rating Systems and Symbols: Phase I Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/12957.
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The federal government requires that most packaged foods carry a standardized label--the Nutrition Facts panel--that provides nutrition information intended to help consumers make healthful choices. In recent years, manufacturers have begun to include additional nutrition messages on their food packages. These messages are commonly referred to as 'front-of-package' (FOP) labeling. As FOP labeling has multiplied, it has become easy for consumers to be confused about critical nutrition information. In considering how FOP labeling should be used as a nutrition education tool in the future, Congress directed the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to undertake a two-phase study with the IOM on FOP nutrition rating systems and nutrition-related symbols. The Food and Drug Administration is also a sponsor.

In Phase 1 of its study, the IOM reviewed current systems and examined the strength and limitations of the nutrition criteria that underlie them. The IOM concludes that it would be useful for FOP labeling to display calorie information and serving sizes in familiar household measures. In addition, as FOP systems may have the greatest benefit if the nutrients displayed are limited to those most closely related to prominent health conditions, FOP labeling should provide information on saturated fats, trans fats, and sodium.

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