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Managing University Intellectual Property in the Public Interest (2011)

Chapter:Appendix B: Conference Presenters

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Conference Presenters ." National Research Council. 2011. Managing University Intellectual Property in the Public Interest. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13001.
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Appendix B
List of Presenters by Meeting1

First Meeting of the Committee

June 30-July 1, 2008

National Academy of Sciences Headquarters

2100 C Street, NW, Washington, D.C.


John Raubitschek, US Department of Commerce (Ret.)

Bob Hardy, Council on Government Relations

Richard J. Johnson, Covington and Burling, LLP

William Zerhouni, Covington and Burling, LLP

John Vaughn, Association of American Universities

Louis Masi, IBM

Erik Iverson, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

E. Jonathan Soderstrom, Yale University on behalf of Association of University Technology Managers

Wendy Streitz, University of California System on behalf of Council on Government Relations


Second Meeting of the Committee

August 28-29, 2008

The Keck Center

500 Fifth Street, NW, Washington, D.C.


Susan Butts, The Dow Chemical Company

Mark Allen, Georgia Institute of Technology

Marvin Parnes, University of Michigan

John B. Parks, University of South Carolina

Mark Rohrbaugh, National Institutes of Health

Ann Hammersla, National Institutes of Health

William Rees, Department of Defense

Paul Gottlieb, Department of Energy

Amy Northcutt, National Science Foundation

Linda Katehi, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Greg Simon, FasterCures

Stephen Dahms, Alfred E. Mann Foundation

Robert Lodder, University of Kentucky

1

Affiliations are at the time of the meeting.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Conference Presenters ." National Research Council. 2011. Managing University Intellectual Property in the Public Interest. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13001.
×

Management of University Intellectual Property Conference

November 21-22, 2008

Third Meeting of the Committee

National Academy of Sciences Headquarters

2100 C Street, NW, Washington, D.C.


Labeeb Abboud, International AIDS Vaccine Initiative

Forest Baskett, New Enterprise Associates

Melvin Bernstein, University of Maryland

Dana Bostrom, Portland State University

Rochelle Dreyfuss, New York University

Thomas Fogarty, Fogarty Engineering

Maria Friere, Global Alliance for TB Drug Development

Case Grogan, California Institute of Technology

Richard Heilfrich, Alameda Capital

Tony Hey, Microsoft Research

Krisztina Holly, University of Southern California

Kristina Johnson, The Johns Hopkins University

Jerome Kassirer, Tufts University

Martin Kenney, University of California at Davis

Sheldon Krimsky, Tufts University

Steven Lazarus, ARCH Venture Partners

John Maraganore, Alnylam Pharmaceuticals

Louise Perkins, Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation

Allen Poirson, Glaucoma Research Foundation

Arti Rai, Duke University School of Law

Bhaven Sampat, Columbia University

Donald Siegel, State University of New York at Albany

Ashley Stevens, Boston University

John Walsh, Georgia Institute of Technology

Diana Wetmore, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

Arvids Ziedonis, University of Michigan


Fourth Meeting of the Committee

February 17-18, 2009

The Keck Center

500 Fifth Street, NW, Washington, D.C.


Ed Roberts, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Lesa Mitchell, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Conference Presenters ." National Research Council. 2011. Managing University Intellectual Property in the Public Interest. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13001.
×
Page91
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Conference Presenters ." National Research Council. 2011. Managing University Intellectual Property in the Public Interest. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13001.
×
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Thirty years ago federal policy underwent a major change through the Bayh-Dole Act of 1980, which fostered greater uniformity in the way research agencies treat inventions arising from the work they sponsor. Before the Act, if government agencies funded university research, the funding agency retained ownership of the knowledge and technologies that resulted. However, very little federally funded research was actually commercialized. As a result of the Act's passage, patenting and licensing activity from such research has accelerated.

Although the system created by the Act has remained stable, it has generated debate about whether it might impede other forms of knowledge transfer. Concerns have also arisen that universities might prioritize commercialization at the expense of their traditional mission to pursue fundamental knowledge--for example, by steering research away from curiosity-driven topics toward applications that could yield financial returns.

To address these concerns, the National Research Council convened a committee of experts from universities, industry, foundations, and similar organizations, as well as scholars of the subject, to review experience and evidence of the technology transfer system's effects and to recommend improvements. The present volume summarizes the committee's principal findings and recommendations.

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