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Missouri River Planning: Recognizing and Incorporating Sediment Management (2011)

Chapter:Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on Missouri River Recovery and Associated Sediment Management Issues

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on Missouri River Recovery and Associated Sediment Management Issues." National Research Council. 2011. Missouri River Planning: Recognizing and Incorporating Sediment Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13019.
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Appendix C
Biographical Information: Committee on Missouri River Recovery and Associated Sediment Management Issues

Leonard A. Shabman, Chair, is Resident Scholar at Resources for the Future. Previously he was professor of agriculture and applied economics in the Department of Agricultural Economics at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Dr. Shabman’s interests include economics, water resources, policy analysis, resource planning, wetlands, and pollution control. He also has served as an economic adviser to the Water Resources Council and as scientific advisor to the Assistant Secretary of the Army, Civil Works. Dr. Shabman is a past member of the NRC Water Science and Technology Board (WSTB) and has chaired and been a member of several National Research Council committees. He received his Ph.D. degree in agricultural economics from Cornell University.


Thomas Dunne (NAS) is a professor in the Donald Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at the University of California at Santa Barbara. He is a hydrologist and a geomorphologist, with research interests that include alluvial processes; field and theoretical studies of drainage basin and hillslope evolution; sediment transport and floodplain sedimentation; and debris flows and sediment budgets of drainage basins. Dr. Dunne served as a member of the WSTB Committee on Water Resources Research and Committee on Opportunities in the Hydrologic Sciences and was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 1988. He has acted as scientific advisor to the United Nations, the governments of Brazil, Taiwan, Kenya, Spain, the Philippines, Washington, Oregon, and several U.S. federal agencies. Dr. Dunne is a recipient of the American Geophysical Union

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on Missouri River Recovery and Associated Sediment Management Issues." National Research Council. 2011. Missouri River Planning: Recognizing and Incorporating Sediment Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13019.
×

Horton Award. He holds a B.A. degree from Cambridge University and a Ph.D. degree in geography from Johns Hopkins University.


David L. Galat is Assistant Unit Leader at the U. S. Geological Survey’s Missouri Cooperative Research Unit and Associate Professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, University of Missouri. Dr. Galat has been major advisor to over 20 graduate students and has taught university classes in fish and wetland ecology and the role of science in environmental decisions. His and his graduate students research centers on ecology and restoration of aquatic resources of large rivers and floodplain wetlands, particularly within the Missouri–Mississippi basin. He is also interested in the role of science in informing natural resource policy and the application of adaptive management principles to ecosystem conservation and rehabilitation. Dr. Galat is an author of over 75 professional publications in aquatic and restoration ecology. He has served on numerous regional, national, and international committees dealing with river-floodplain ecology and restoration. Notable examples include his work with the White House, Interagency Floodplain Management Review Team, National Research Council Committees on Water Resources Planning, and the National River Restoration Science Synthesis. He currently serves on the science advisory boards of the Upper Mississippi Navigation and Ecosystem Sustainability Program and the Platter River Recovery Implementation Program and is a member of the Collaborative Adaptive Management Network’s (CAMNet) Core Advisory Group. He also serves on the editorial board of River Research & Applications. Dr. Galat received his B.S. degree from Cornell University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Colorado State University.


William L. Graf is University Foundation Distinguished Professor, Professor of Geography, and Interim Associate Dean for Research of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of South Carolina. His research addresses two broad topics: geomorphology and hydrology of rivers, and the intersection of science and policy for public land and water. He has conducted research and served in science oversight positions associated with water quality, water quantity, aquatic and riparian habitats, and endangered species in a variety of ecosystems including the Klamath River of California and Oregon, streams of the Colorado Plateau, Colorado River, Rio Grande, Platte River, and the Everglades, as well as rivers in the southeastern United States. He is also a National Associate of the National Academy of Sciences, and he has chaired or been a member of more than a dozen National Research Council committees and boards. He is a Past President of the Association of American Geographers; he was appointed to the Presidential Commission on American Heritage Rivers; and he is a member of the Environmental Advisory Board to the Chief of the U.S.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on Missouri River Recovery and Associated Sediment Management Issues." National Research Council. 2011. Missouri River Planning: Recognizing and Incorporating Sediment Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13019.
×

Army Corps of Engineers. His several books and more than 140 papers and book chapters have resulted from funding by agencies such as the National Science Foundation, National Park Service, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of Justice, and a variety of state and local agencies. His work has been recognized by awards from the Association of American Geographers, Geological Society of America, and he has been awarded Guggenheim and Fulbright fellowships. President Clinton appointed him to the Presidential Commission on American Heritage Rivers, and he current serves on the Environmental Advisory Board to the Chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. His B.A. degree, M.S. Certificate in Water Resources Management, and Ph.D. degree are from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.


Rollin H. Hotchkiss is professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Brigham Young University. His current research includes developing a coupled upland-erosion, instream hydrodynamic-sediment transport model for assessing primary impacts of forest management practices on sediment yield and delivery; understanding the influence of successional development on periphyton scour; and the design of bridges and culverts for fish passage. Dr. Hotchkiss is chair of the Environmental and Water Resources Institute Watershed Council and associate editor of the Journal of Hydraulic Engineering. He is a member of several organizations, including the American Society of Civil Engineers, International Association of Hydraulic Research, and American Fisheries Society. Dr. Hotchkiss received his B.S. degree in civil engineering from Brigham Young University; his M.S. degree in civil and environmental engineering from Utah State University; and his Ph.D. degree in civil and mineral engineering from the University of Minnesota.


W. Carter Johnson is distinguished professor of ecology in the Department of Horticulture, Forestry, Landscape and Parks at South Dakota State University. Dr. Johnson’s primary research interests are in streamflow regulation and riparian ecosystems, restoration of ecological and economic sustainability of western rangelands, multifunctional agriculture and agro-ecological restoration, and global climate change and prairie wetlands. Dr. Johnson has conducted most of his research in the Missouri River Basin. He received the W. S. Cooper Award in 1996 from the Ecological Society of America and has served on 3 previous NRC panels on large river systems. Dr. Johnson received his B.S. degree from Augustana College (Sioux Falls, South Dakota) and his Ph.D. degree from North Dakota State University.


Patricia F. McDowell is professor of geography and professor of environmental studies at the University of Oregon. She teaches courses in fluvial

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on Missouri River Recovery and Associated Sediment Management Issues." National Research Council. 2011. Missouri River Planning: Recognizing and Incorporating Sediment Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13019.
×

geomorphology, watershed science and policy, and soils geography. Her current research focuses on geomorphic response of river channels and floodplains to human impacts and environmental change, and on river restoration. At the University of Oregon, she served as Associate Vice President for Research from 1990 to 1993 and as Chair of the Department of Geography from 1993 to 1996 and 2004 to 2008. She has served the NRC as a member on the Committee on Research Priorities in Geography at the USGS and the Committee on Review of Methods for Establishing Instream Flows for Texas Rivers. Dr. McDowell earned her B.Arch. and M.C.R.P. degrees from the Illinois Institute of Technology and her Ph.D. degree in geography from the University of Wisconsin.


Robert H. Meade is research hydrologist emeritus at the U.S. Geological Survey in Denver. His studies of rivers have centered on transport and storage of sediment in the Orinoco and Amazon Rivers of South America, long-term channel changes in Powder River of Montana, transport and deposition of riverine sediment in estuaries and coastal regions, and assessments of pollutants and sediments in the Mississippi River system. He served as a member of the NRC Committee on the Review of the Louisiana Coastal Protection and Restoration Program. Dr. Meade received his B.S. degree in geology in 1952 from the University of Oklahoma, and his M.S. degree (1957) and his Ph.D. degree (1960) in geology from Stanford University.


Roger K. Patterson is assistant general manager for Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, overseeing Metropolitan’s strategic water initiatives for the Colorado River and Sacramento-San Joaquin Bay Delta. Mr. Patterson was the director of the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources from 1999 to 2005. He was responsible for water administration, water planning, floodplain delineation, dam safety and the state databank. He represented Nebraska on interstate compacts, decrees and basin associations and led the state team in the settlement of U.S. Supreme Court cases on the North Platte and Republican rivers. Prior to his work in Nebraska, Patterson served 25 years with the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. During his Reclamation tenure, he served as regional director in both the mid-Pacific region based in Sacramento and the Great Plains region headquartered in Billings, Montana. A registered professional engineer in Nebraska and Colorado, Mr. Patterson earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees in engineering from the University of Nebraska.


Nicholas Pinter is a professor in the Department of Geology and in the Environmental Resources and Policy Program at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale. His work is in the area of earth-surface processes, with a focus

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on Missouri River Recovery and Associated Sediment Management Issues." National Research Council. 2011. Missouri River Planning: Recognizing and Incorporating Sediment Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13019.
×

on fluvial geomorphology, flood hydrology, and floodplain management. His research and teaching also span other areas of surficial earth processes and their scientific and policy applications. Dr. Pinter’s current projects include investigating the changes in morphology and flow dynamics of the Mississippi River system through the past century of river modification and management. A particular focus has been hydrologic, statistical, and modeling assessments of changes in flood occurrence and flood dynamics. Similar research involves looking at comparable changes on other river systems, including a number of large navigable rivers in Europe. Dr. Pinter holds a B.A. degree from Cornell University, an M.S. degree from The Pennsylvania State University, and a Ph.D. degree from the University of California at Santa Barbara.


Sujoy B. Roy is an environmental engineer at Tetra Tech with extensive experience studying water quality and water supply impacts in large watersheds. His recent work involves the modeling of drinking water contaminants in California’s Central Valley, as well as development of a master plan to manage land uses in the Mokelumne River watershed. Dr. Roy also led the development of a master plan to improve the water quality of the New and Alamo Rivers, specifically suspended solids, nutrients, and trace metals and organics. Dr. Roy provides support to the EPA for the development of nutrient standards in all surface waters in the states of California, Nevada, Arizona, and Hawaii. Past representative studies include the development of a model to predict the response of Chesapeake Bay to changing nutrient sources in the watershed and airshed, assessment of transport of chemicals on colloidal particles, evaluation of mercury fate and transport in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, experimental evaluation of PCB leaching from sludges, and modeling of transport of contaminants from former manufactured gas plant sites. Dr. Roy holds M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in civil and environmental engineering from Carnegie Mellon University and a B.Tech. degree in civil engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi, India.


Donald Scavia is Graham Family professor of sustainability, professor of natural resources and environment, professor of civil and environmental engineering, and director of the Graham Sustainability Institute at the University of Michigan. Prior to joining the Michigan faculty, he worked at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration as Chief Scientist of the National Ocean Service and Director of the National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science and the Coastal Ocean Program. Dr. Scavia’s research interests include the effects of natural and anthropogenic stresses on Great Lakes and marine ecosystems, with a focus on the use of models and integrated assessments in transferring knowledge to the decision-making process. He

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on Missouri River Recovery and Associated Sediment Management Issues." National Research Council. 2011. Missouri River Planning: Recognizing and Incorporating Sediment Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13019.
×

is principal investigator on three NOAA projects: two on coastal and Great Lakes hypoxia and ecological forecasting that focus on modeling the impacts of land-use changes, and one on climate adaptation in the Great Lakes region. Dr. Scavia earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees in environmental engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and his Ph.D. degree in environmental engineering from the University of Michigan.


Sandra B. Zellmer is the Law Alumni Professor of Natural Resources Law at the University of Nebraska College of Law. She previously was a professor at the University of Toledo College of Law. She also served as a trial attorney in the Environment and Natural Resources Division of the U.S. Department of Justice, where she litigated public lands and wildlife issues for various federal agencies, including the National Forest Service, National Park Service, and Fish and Wildlife Service. She has practiced law at Faegre & Benson in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and clerked for the Honorable William W. Justice, U.S. District Court, Eastern District of Texas. Ms. Zellmer teaches and writes about natural resources, public lands, water conservation and use, and constitutional and environmental law. Ms. Zellmer received her LLM in environmental law from the George Washington University National Law Center, J.D. from the University of South Dakota School of Law, and B.S. degree from Morningside College.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on Missouri River Recovery and Associated Sediment Management Issues." National Research Council. 2011. Missouri River Planning: Recognizing and Incorporating Sediment Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13019.
×
Page147
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on Missouri River Recovery and Associated Sediment Management Issues." National Research Council. 2011. Missouri River Planning: Recognizing and Incorporating Sediment Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13019.
×
Page148
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on Missouri River Recovery and Associated Sediment Management Issues." National Research Council. 2011. Missouri River Planning: Recognizing and Incorporating Sediment Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13019.
×
Page149
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on Missouri River Recovery and Associated Sediment Management Issues." National Research Council. 2011. Missouri River Planning: Recognizing and Incorporating Sediment Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13019.
×
Page150
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on Missouri River Recovery and Associated Sediment Management Issues." National Research Council. 2011. Missouri River Planning: Recognizing and Incorporating Sediment Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13019.
×
Page151
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographical Information: Committee on Missouri River Recovery and Associated Sediment Management Issues." National Research Council. 2011. Missouri River Planning: Recognizing and Incorporating Sediment Management. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13019.
×
Page152
Missouri River Planning: Recognizing and Incorporating Sediment Management Get This Book
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Historically, the flow of sediment in the Missouri River has been as important as the flow of water for a variety of river functions. The sediment has helped form a dynamic network of islands, sandbars, and floodplains, and provided habitats for native species. Further downstream, sediment transported by the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers has helped build and sustain the coastal wetlands of the Mississippi River delta. The construction of dams and river bank control structures on the Missouri River and its tributaries, however, has markedly reduced the volume of sediment transported by the river. These projects have had several ecological impacts, most notably on some native fish and bird species that depended on habitats and landforms created by sediment flow.

Missouri River Planning describes the historic role of sediment in the Missouri River, evaluates current habitat restoration strategies, and discusses possible sediment management alternatives. The book finds that a better understanding of the processes of sediment transport, erosion, and deposition in the Missouri River will be useful in furthering river management objectives, such as protection of endangered species and development of water quality standards.

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