National Academies Press: OpenBook

Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health (2011)

Chapter:Appendix A: Public Meeting Agendas

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
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A

Public Meeting Agendas

PUBLIC MEETING

April 1, 2010
Keck Center of the National Academies
500 Fifth Street, NW, Washington, DC

1:00 p.m.

Conduct of the open session and introduction of participants

John D. Spengler, PhD

Committee Chair

1:05 p.m.

Charge to the Committee

Laura Kolb, MPH

Indoor Environments Division, US Environmental Protection Agency

1:50 p.m.

Open session ends

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
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WORKSHOP 1

June 7, 2010
Keck Center of the National Academies

500 Fifth Street, NW, Washington, DC

11:00 a.m.

Welcome to the National Academies and the Institute of Medicine; conduct of the open session and introduction of participants

John D. Spengler, PhD

Committee Chair

11:15 a.m.

Welcome and opening remarks

Mike Flynn

Director, Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, US Environmental Protection Agency

Session I—Occupant-related issues

11:35 a.m.

Climate change and public health—CDC’s perspective and research

Jeremy Hess, MD, MPH

Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine and Assistant Professor, Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Emory University Schools of Medicine and Public Health; Consultant, Global Climate Change Program, National Center for Environmental Health, CDC

12:45 p.m.

Vulnerable populations for climate change health effects

John Balbus, MD, MPH

Senior Advisor for Public Health, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, CDC

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×

1:10 p.m.

Infectious disease transmission and climate change

David Fisman, MD, MPH, FRCP(C)

Associate Professor, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and Associate Professor of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto

1:35 p.m.

The effects of increasing air temperature on humans

Ralph Goldman, PhD

Independent consultant

2:00 p.m.

CO2, climate change, and the aerobiology of allergenic weeds

Lewis H. Ziska, PhD

Research Plant Physiologist, Crop Systems and Global Change, US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service

2:25 p.m.

Roundtable discussion—session I speakers

John D. Spengler, PhD, moderator

Session II—Building-related issues

2:50 p.m.

The influence of climatic variables on building and HVAC system design and operation

Andrew K. Persily, PhD

Leader, Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation Group, Building and Fire Research Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology

3:15 p.m.

Adaptation and mitigation strategies for buildings in a changed climate

Terry M. Brennan, MS

President, Camroden Associates, Inc.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×

3:40 p.m.

Climate change and sustainable architecture

Christoph Reinhart, PhD

Associate Professor of Architectural Technology, Department of Architecture and Group Head, Graduate School of Design–Sustainable Design [G(SD)2] Initiative, Harvard University

4:10 p.m.

Climate change and the built environment

Franklin W. Nutter, JD

President, Reinsurance Association of America

4:35 p.m.

HUD’s national surveys of lead and other residential exposures: A possible model for national IEQ surveillance?

Peter J. Ashley, DrPH

Director, Policy and Standards Division, Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control, Department of Housing and Urban Development

5:00 p.m.

Roundtable discussion—session II speakers

John D. Spengler, PhD, moderator

5:15 p.m.

General discussion—day’s speakers and committee members

John D. Spengler, PhD, moderator

5:30 p.m.

Workshop ends

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×

WORKSHOP 2

July 14, 2010
Clark Kerr Campus
University of California at Berkeley

9:00 a.m.

Welcome to the Workshop; conduct of the workshop and introduction of the Committee

John D. Spengler, PhD

Committee Chair

9:15 a.m.

Climate change, energy efficiency, and IEQ research

William J. Fisk, MS

Senior Staff Scientist and Department Head, Indoor Environment Department, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

10:00 a.m.

Indoor climate and climate change—a perspective on research needs

Hal Levin, BArch

Research Architect and President, Building Ecology Research Group

11:00 a.m.

The impact of indoor air pollution sources on climate

Kirk R. Smith, PhD, MPH

Professor of Global Environmental Health, and Director of the Global Health and Environment Program, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley

11:45 a.m.

Climate change and human health

Kristie L. Ebi, PhD, MPH

Executive Director, Technical Support Unit, Working Group II (Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability), Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×

1:00 p.m.

Roundtable discussion—committee, speakers, and observers

John D. Spengler, PhD, moderator

2:00 p.m.

Workshop ends

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×
Page257
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×
Page258
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×
Page259
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×
Page260
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×
Page261
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Public Meeting Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×
Page262
Next: Appendix B: Environmental Protection Agency Contractor Reports on Climate-Change, Indoor-Environment, and Health Topics »
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The indoor environment affects occupants' health and comfort. Poor environmental conditions and indoor contaminants are estimated to cost the U.S. economy tens of billions of dollars a year in exacerbation of illnesses like asthma, allergic symptoms, and subsequent lost productivity. Climate change has the potential to affect the indoor environment because conditions inside buildings are influenced by conditions outside them.

Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health addresses the impacts that climate change may have on the indoor environment and the resulting health effects. It finds that steps taken to mitigate climate change may cause or exacerbate harmful indoor environmental conditions. The book discusses the role the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) should take in informing the public, health professionals, and those in the building industry about potential risks and what can be done to address them. The study also recommends that building codes account for climate change projections; that federal agencies join to develop or refine protocols and testing standards for evaluating emissions from materials, furnishings, and appliances used in buildings; and that building weatherization efforts include consideration of health effects.

Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health is written primarily for the EPA and other federal agencies, organizations, and researchers with interests in public health; the environment; building design, construction, and operation; and climate issues.

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