National Academies Press: OpenBook

Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health (2011)

Chapter:Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
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C

Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

John D. Spengler, PhD (Chair), is the Akira Yamaguchi Professor of Environmental Health and Human Habitation in the Department of Environmental Health of Harvard University’s School of Public Health. He has conducted research in personal monitoring, air-pollution health effects, aerosol characterization, and indoor air. More recently, Dr. Spengler has been involved in research that includes the integration of knowledge about indoor and outdoor air pollution and other risk factors into the design of housing, buildings, and communities. He uses the tools of life-cycle analysis, risk assessment, and activity-based costing to measure the sustainable attributes of alternative designs, practices, and community development. Dr. Spengler has served as an adviser to the World Health Organization on indoor air pollution, personal exposure, and air-pollution epidemiology. He serves on the Institute of Medicine Roundtable for Environmental Health and recently chaired a National Research Council Committee on Green Schools. In 2003, Dr. Spengler was the recipient of the Heinz Award for the Environment; in 2008, he was honored by the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate Academy of Fellows with the Max von Pettenkofer award for distinguished contributions to the field of indoor-air science. He received a BS in physics from the University of Notre Dame, an MS in environmental health sciences from Harvard University, and a PhD in atmospheric sciences from the State University of New York-Albany.

John L. Adgate, PhD, is Professor and Chair of the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health in the Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado, Denver. His research on exposure assessment, risk

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
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analysis, and children’s environmental health has focused on improving exposure assessment in epidemiologic studies by documenting the magnitude and variability of human exposures. Dr. Adgate has served on many science advisory panels of the US Environmental Protection Agency, exploring technical and policy issues related to residential exposures. Dr. Adgate received a BA in biology from Calvin College, an MSPH in environmental science from the School of Public Health of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a PhD in environmental health granted jointly by the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and Rutgers University.

Antonio J. Busalacchi, Jr., PhD, is Director of the Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center and a Professor in the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science of the University of Maryland. His research interests include tropical ocean circulation and its role in the coupled climate system and climate variability and predictability. Dr. Busalacchi has been involved in the activities of the World Climate Research Programme for many years and is chair of its Joint Scientific Committee. Dr. Busalacchi is chair of the National Research Council Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, a member of its Panel on Advancing the Science of Climate Change, and cochair of the Research Council Committee on National Security Implications of Climate Change on US Naval Forces. He holds a BS in physics and an MS and a PhD in oceanography from Florida State University.

Ginger L. Chew, ScD, is an Epidemiologist in the National Center for Environmental Health of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). She is also Adjunct Professor at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. Dr. Chew’s research has focused on exposure assessment of aeroallergens and fungi in the indoor environments of low-income children. She has been part of a team that is designing a nationwide study of low-income homes that have been renovated with green or traditional materials and methods. In 2005, Dr. Chew participated in CDC’s environmental-health response to Hurricane Katrina, helping to plan its air-sampling strategy and perform data analysis and interpretation. She holds a BS from the University of Georgia, an MS from the University of Alabama, and an ScD from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Sir Andrew Haines, MBBS, MD, is Professor of Public Health and Primary Care of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, where he served as Director until October 2010. His research interests are in epidemiology and health-services research, focusing on the study of environmental influences on health, including the potential effects of global environmental change. In 2009, he chaired an international task force of 55 scientists from nine countries that undertook a program of research on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
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climate-change mitigation and public health, whose results were published in a series of articles in The Lancet in December 2009. Dr. Haines serves on a number of major international and national committees, including the Advisory Board of the National Institute for Health Research of England, the Medical Research Council (MRC) Global Health Group, and the MRC Strategy Group. He was formerly a member of the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and of the World Health Organization Advisory Committee on Health Research. Dr. Haines earned his MBBS in medicine and MD in medicine and epidemiology from the University of London. He is a Foreign Associate Member of the Institute of Medicine.

Steven M. Holland, MD, is Chief of the Laboratory of Clinical Infectious Diseases of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health. He is also a tenured investigator and Chief of the Immunopathogenesis Section of the laboratory. Dr. Holland’s major research interests include susceptibility to disseminated and pulmonary mycobacterial infections, mechanisms of mycobacterial and bacterial pathogenesis, and mechanisms of phagocyte immunodeficiency. From 2006 to 2008, he served as President of the International Immunocompromised Host Society. Dr. Holland received his MD from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he served as a resident in internal medicine, assistant chief of service in medicine, and fellow in infectious diseases. He is Board-certified in internal medicine with a subspecialty in infectious disease.

Vivian E. Loftness, MArch, FAIA, is University Professor of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University and Senior Researcher in its Center for Building Performance and Diagnostics. She is an international energy and building-performance consultant for commercial and residential building design and has researched and written extensively on energy conservation, passive solar design, climate, and regionalism in architecture. Prof. Loftness is a member of the Pennsylvania State Climate Change Advisory Committee and has served on several National Academies committees, including the Committee on Review and Assessment of the Health and Productivity Benefits of Green Schools. She has worked for many years with the Architectural and Building Sciences Division of Public Works Canada, researching and developing the issues of total building performance and the field of building diagnostics. Prof. Loftness holds a BS and an MArch from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects and is a registered architect.

Linda A. McCauley, PhD, FAAN, RN, is Professor and Dean of Emory University’s Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing. Dr. McCauley has

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×

expertise in the design of epidemiologic investigations of environmental hazards and is nationally recognized for her expertise in occupational-health and environmental-health nursing. Her work aims to identify culturally appropriate interventions to decrease the effects of environmental and occupational health hazards in vulnerable populations, including workers and young children. Dr. McCauley was previously the Associate Dean for Research and the Nightingale Professor of Nursing in the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. She received a bachelor of nursing degree from the University of North Carolina, a master’s in nursing from Emory, and a doctorate in environmental health and epidemiology from the University of Cincinnati. She is a Member of the Institute of Medicine.

William W. Nazaroff, PhD, is the Daniel Tellep Distinguished Professor and Vice-Chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering of the University of California, Berkeley. His main research interest is in indoor air quality, with an emphasis on pollutant-surface interactions, transport and mixing phenomena, aerosols, source characterization, exposure assessment, and control techniques; and his teaching activities include a course that assesses the technologic opportunities for mitigating climate change. Dr. Nazaroff is coeditor of Indoor Air and Vice President of the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate Academy of Fellows. He received his BA in physics and his MEng in electrical engineering and computer science from the University of California, Berkeley, and his PhD in environmental engineering science from the California Institute of Technology.

Eileen Storey, MD, MPH, is Chief of the Surveillance Branch, Division of Respiratory Disease Studies, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. She has been serving as Acting Chief for the Surveillance Branch since February 2009. She was formerly Chief of the Division of Public Health and Health Policy and Director of the Center for Indoor Environments and Health at the University of Connecticut Health Center. Dr. Storey’s research focuses on the spectrum of respiratory disease associated with indoor environments, with particular interest in the relationship between building-related upper respiratory syndromes, such as rhinitis and sinusitis, and the development of lower respiratory syndromes, such as asthma and hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Her work addresses the development of exposure-assessment tools to characterize indoor risk factors. Dr. Storey received her MD from the Harvard Medical School and her MPH from the Harvard School of Public Health. She is Board-certified in internal medicine and occupational medicine.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×

INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE STAFF

David A. Butler, PhD, is Senior Program Officer in the Institute of Medicine (IOM). He received his BS and MS in engineering from the University of Rochester and his PhD in public-policy analysis from Carnegie Mellon University. Before joining the IOM, Dr. Butler served as an analyst for the US Congress Office of Technology Assessment, was Research Associate in the Department of Environmental Health of the Harvard School of Public Health, and performed research at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He has directed several IOM studies on environmental-health and risk-assessment topics, including ones that produced Damp Indoor Spaces and Health, Clearing the Air—Asthma and Indoor Air Exposures, Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 1998 and Update 2000, and the series Characterizing the Exposure of Veterans to Agent Orange and Other Herbicides Used in Vietnam. Dr. Butler was also a coeditor of Systems Engineering to Improve Traumatic Brain Injury Care in the Military Health System.

Lauren N. Savaglio, MS, is a Research Associate in the Institute of Medicine. She received her BS in political science and international relations from Arizona State University and her MS in global health from George Mason University (GMU), where her research interests included pesticide use in agriculture and the nutritional status of those infected with HIV/AIDS. She is also an Adjunct Professor in GMU’s Department of Global and Community Health, where she teaches health and environment courses. Before going to the IOM, she practiced as an emergency medical technician at INOVA Fair Oaks Hospital in Virginia, performed HIV/AIDS research for Whitman-Walker Health, and served in the Peace Corps in Togo, West Africa.

Tia S. Carter, MHA, is a Senior Program Assistant in the Institute of Medicine. In December 2008, she graduated with her master’s in health-care administration from the University of Maryland, University College. She received her undergraduate degree in community health from the University of Maryland, College Park. Before going to the IOM, she worked as the Health Promotions Coordinator at the Greater Washington Urban League in the Division of Aging and Health Services, where she was responsible for health-promotion and disease-prevention education services and activities among the elderly. She has been involved with the IOM committees responsible for the reports Asbestos: Selected Cancers and Veterans and Agent Orange: Update 2004 and Update 2006.

Rachel S. Briks, BS, is a Program Assistant in the Institute of Medicine Board on the Health of Select Populations. She received her BS in commu-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×

nity health from the University of Maryland, in College Park in May 2010. Before joining the IOM, she interned at AED Center on AIDS and Community Health and worked as a clerk for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Health Statistics through the Student Temporary Employment Program (STEP).

Victoria Wittig, PhD, was a winter 2010 Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the National Academies. She graduated from the University of Illinois with a PhD in plant biology in May 2008. Her thesis research quantified the effects of two rising greenhouse gases—tropospheric ozone and carbon dioxide—on the growth and productivity of trees, a topic that has implications for understanding and modeling the global carbon cycle and climate change. Previously, Dr. Wittig was a postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences, also at the University of Illinois, where she improved models of photosynthesis to project effects of global changes on the terrestrial carbon cycle. She is now working toward applying her academic training at the intersection of environmental science and public policy in Washington, DC.

Rose Marie Martinez, ScD, is Director of the Institute of Medicine Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice. Before joining the IOM, she was Senior Health Researcher at Mathematica Policy Research, where she studied the effects of health-system change on the public-health infrastructure, access to care for vulnerable populations, managed care, and the health-care workforce. Dr. Martinez is former Assistant Director for Health Financing and Policy with the US General Accounting Office, for which she directed evaluations and policy analysis on national and public-health issues. Dr. Martinez received her doctorate from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×
Page267
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×
Page268
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×
Page269
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×
Page270
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×
Page271
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine. 2011. Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13115.
×
Page272
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The indoor environment affects occupants' health and comfort. Poor environmental conditions and indoor contaminants are estimated to cost the U.S. economy tens of billions of dollars a year in exacerbation of illnesses like asthma, allergic symptoms, and subsequent lost productivity. Climate change has the potential to affect the indoor environment because conditions inside buildings are influenced by conditions outside them.

Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health addresses the impacts that climate change may have on the indoor environment and the resulting health effects. It finds that steps taken to mitigate climate change may cause or exacerbate harmful indoor environmental conditions. The book discusses the role the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) should take in informing the public, health professionals, and those in the building industry about potential risks and what can be done to address them. The study also recommends that building codes account for climate change projections; that federal agencies join to develop or refine protocols and testing standards for evaluating emissions from materials, furnishings, and appliances used in buildings; and that building weatherization efforts include consideration of health effects.

Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health is written primarily for the EPA and other federal agencies, organizations, and researchers with interests in public health; the environment; building design, construction, and operation; and climate issues.

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