National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Notes
Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Research Council. 2011. Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13158.
×

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This report originated from, but was not restricted to, a workshop on highly successful STEM education in K-12 schools that was held in Washington on May 10-12, 2011, and that was organized by the committee. The committee would like to thank the individuals who provided presentations during the workshop; see http://www7.nationalacademies.org/bose/STEM_Schools_Workshop_Agenda.pdf for the open agenda of the workshop and Appendix for a list of commissioned papers and authors.

The committee would like to thank the staff of the National Research Council who made the workshop and this report possible, especially Natalie Nielsen for leading this effort; Martin Storksdieck and Stuart Elliott for providing oversight from the Board on Science Education and the Board on Testing and Assessment; Thomas Keller and Michael Feder for expert support; Rebecca Krone for providing organizational and administrative support; Robert Hauser, Patricia Morison, Ralph Cicerone, and Connie Citro for providing strategic perspective; the staff of the Report Review Committee; the Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education reports office; and the National Academies Press for enabling the rapid production of this report.

This report has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the Report Review Committee of the National Research Council. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process. We wish to thank the following individuals for their review of this report: Asad A. Abidi, Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles; Ruth Anderson, Facet Innovations, Inc., Seattle, Washington; Mark Dynarski, Pemberton Research, East Windsor, New Jersey; Jacob Foster, Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education; Phillip A. Griffiths, School of Mathematics, Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, New Jersey; Ernest M. Henley, Department of Physics, Washington University; Carolyn D. Herrington, Center on Educational Policy, Learning Systems Institute, Florida State University; Margaret A. Honey, New York Hall of Science; Susan W. Kieffer, Department of Geology, University of Illinois; C. Ford Morishita, Clackamas High School, Oregon; Steven J. Long, Rogers High School, Arkansas; and Stephen L. Pruitt, Achieve, Inc., Washington, DC.

Although the reviewers listed above have provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the conclusions or recommendations nor did they see the final draft of the report before its release. The review of this report was overseen by Stephen E. Fienberg, Department of Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University, and Michael E. Martinez, Department of Education, University of California, Irvine, as review monitor and coordinator, respectively. Appointed by the National Research Council, they were responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this report rests entirely with the authoring committee and the institution.

Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Research Council. 2011. Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13158.
×

BOARD ON SCIENCE EDUCATION

HELEN QUINN (Chair), Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University

PHILIP BELL, LIFE Center, University of Washington

GEORGE BOGGS, Palomar College (Emeritus), San Marcos, California

WILLIAM B. BONVILLIAN, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Washington, DC, Office

JOSEPH S. FRANCISCO, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University

ADAM GAMORAN, Department of Sociology and Wisconsin Center for Education Research, University of Wisconsin–Madison

JERRY P. GOLLUB, Physics Department, Haverford College

MARGARET HONEY, New York Hall of Science

JAN HUSTLER, Synopsys, Inc., Mountain View, California

SUSAN W. KIEFFER, Department of Geology, University of Illinois

BRETT D. MOULDING, Educational Consultant, Ogden, Utah

CARLO PARRAVANO, Merck Institute for Science Education, Rahway, New Jersey

SUSAN R. SINGER, Department of Biology, Carleton College

WILLIAM B. WOOD, Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology (Emeritus), University of Colorado, Boulder



MARTIN STORKSDIECK, Director

HEIDI A. SCHWEINGRUBER, Deputy Director

MICHAEL FEDER, Senior Program Officer (on temporary assignment with the Office of Science and Technology Policy)

MARGRET HILTON, Senior Program Officer

THOMAS E. KELLER, Senior Program Officer

NATALIE NIELSEN, Senior Program Officer

SHERRIE FORREST, Research Associate

REBECCA KRONE, Program Associate

ANTHONY BROWN, Program Assistant

Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Research Council. 2011. Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13158.
×

BOARD ON TESTING AND ASSESSMENT

EDWARD H. HAERTEL (Chair), School of Education, Stanford University

LYLE F. BACHMAN, Department of Applied Linguistics, University of California, Los Angeles

STEPHEN B. DUNBAR, College of Education, University of Iowa

DAVID J. FRANCIS, Texas Institute for Measurement, Statistics and Evaluation, University of Houston

MICHAEL T. KANE, Educational Testing Service

KEVIN LANG, Department of Economics, Boston University

MICHAEL T. NETTLES, Educational Testing Service, Policy Evaluation and Research Center

DIANA C. PULLIN, School of Education, Boston College

BRIAN STECHER, The RAND Corporation

MARK R. WILSON, Graduate School of Education, University of California, Berkeley

REBECCA ZWICK, Educational Testing Service



STUART ELLIOTT, Director

JUDITH A. KOENIG, Senior Program Officer

KELLY IVERSON, Senior Program Assistant

Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Research Council. 2011. Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13158.
×
Page35
Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Research Council. 2011. Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13158.
×
Page36
Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Research Council. 2011. Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13158.
×
Page37
Next: Photo Credits »
Successful K-12 STEM Education: Identifying Effective Approaches in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $17.95 Buy Ebook | $14.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) are cultural achievements that reflect our humanity, power our economy, and constitute fundamental aspects of our lives as citizens, consumers, parents, and members of the workforce. Providing all students with access to quality education in the STEM disciplines is important to our nation's competitiveness. However, it is challenging to identify the most successful schools and approaches in the STEM disciplines because success is defined in many ways and can occur in many different types of schools and settings. In addition, it is difficult to determine whether the success of a school's students is caused by actions the school takes or simply related to the population of students in the school.

Successful K-12 STEM Education defines a framework for understanding "success" in K-12 STEM education. The book focuses its analysis on the science and mathematics parts of STEM and outlines criteria for identifying effective STEM schools and programs. Because a school's success should be defined by and measured relative to its goals, the book identifies three important goals that share certain elements, including learning STEM content and practices, developing positive dispositions toward STEM, and preparing students to be lifelong learners. A successful STEM program would increase the number of students who ultimately pursue advanced degrees and careers in STEM fields, enhance the STEM-capable workforce, and boost STEM literacy for all students. It is also critical to broaden the participation of women and minorities in STEM fields.

Successful K-12 STEM Education examines the vast landscape of K-12 STEM education by considering different school models, highlighting research on effective STEM education practices, and identifying some conditions that promote and limit school- and student-level success in STEM. The book also looks at where further work is needed to develop appropriate data sources. The book will serve as a guide to policy makers; decision makers at the school and district levels; local, state, and federal government agencies; curriculum developers; educators; and parent and education advocacy groups.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!