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Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach (2012)

Chapter:Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13263.
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Appendix A

Agendas for Public Meetings

MEETING 1
Committee on Breast Cancer and the Environment:
The Scientific Evidence, Research Methodology, and Future Directions

The Keck Center of the National Academies
Washington, DC

Wednesday, April 14, 2010

10:45 a.m. Introductory Remarks

Irva Hertz-Picciotto, Ph.D.
Chair, Committee on Breast Cancer and the Environment: The Scientifc Evidence, Research Methodology, and Future Directions


Introductions by committee members and meeting attendees

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13263.
×
11:00 a.m. Study Context and Goals, Sponsor Perspective

Amelie Ramirez, Dr.P.H.
Member, Susan G. Komen for the Cure Scientifc Advisory Board
Director, Institute for Health Promotion Research
University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio


Questions and discussion with the committee

12:00 p.m. Lunch
12:45-2:30 p.m. Comments from Breast Cancer Research and Advocacy Organizations

• What are their concerns and priorities regarding environmental risk factors for breast cancer?


• What do they want to make sure the committee is aware of?


• What do they hope the study will contribute?



Organizations Planning to Present

Avon Foundation: Marc Hurlbert, Ph.D.


Breast Cancer Fund: Janet Gray, Ph.D.


Breast Cancer Research Foundation: Mary Beth Terry, Ph.D. (phone)


National Breast Cancer Coalition: Fran Visco


National Institutes of Health Breast Cancer and Environment Activities: Gwen Collman, Ph.D.


Young Survival Coalition: Marcia Stein

2:45 p.m. Break
3:00–4:30 p.m. Introduction to Issues in Studying Breast Cancer and the Environment
Presentations by Committee Members
4:30 p.m. Opportunity for Individual Public Comment

Kathleen Burns, Ph.D. (phone)
Director, Sciencecorps Lexington, MA

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13263.
×

William Mimiaga, Major, USMC (RET) (phone)
California

Michael Partain (phone)
The Few, The Proud, The Forgotten

James Fontella (phone)
Shelby Township, MI

5:00 p.m. Adjourn Open Session

MEETING 2
Committee on Breast Cancer and the Environment:
The Scientifc Evidence, Research Methodology, and Future Directions

The Hyatt Regency San Francisco
San Francisco, CA

Tuesday, July 6, 2010

2:00 p.m. Introductory Remarks

Irva Hertz-Picciotto, Ph.D.
Chair, Committee on Breast Cancer and the Environment: The Scientifc Evidence, Research Methodology, and Future Directions

Introductions by committee members and meeting attendees
Opportunity for Sponsor Comment

Amelie Ramirez, Dr.P.H.
Member, Susan G. Komen for the Cure Scientifc
Advisory Board
Director, Institute for Health Promotion Research
University of Texas Health Science Center at San
Antonio

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13263.
×
2:15 p.m. Role of Animal Models in Studying Environmental Factors for Breast Cancer

Helmut Zarbl, Ph.D.
Professor, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School


Questions and discussion with the committee
3:00 p.m. Role of Stem Cells in Environmental Risks for Breast Cancer

Zena Werb, Ph.D.
Professor of Anatomy
University of California, San Francisco

Questions and discussion with the committee
3:45 p.m. Linking Prenatal and Neonatal Exposures to Breast Cancer Risks

Dimitrios Trichopoulos, M.D.
Professor of Cancer Prevention and
Professor of Epidemiology
Harvard School of Public Health

Questions and discussion with the committee
4:30 p.m. General Discussion as Needed
4:45-5:25 p.m. Comments from Breast Cancer Research and Advocacy Organizations

• What are their concerns and priorities regarding environmental risk factors for breast cancer?


• What do they want to make sure the committee is aware of?


• What do they hope the study will contribute?

Organizations Planning to Present
American Cancer Society: Michael Thun, M.D.
Breast Cancer Action: Kim Irish, J.D.
Breast Cancer Fund: Nancy Buermeyer
Zero Breast Cancer: Janice Barlow
5:25 p.m. Adjourn Open Session
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13263.
×

Wednesday, July 7, 2010

8:30 a.m. Introductory Remarks

Irva Hertz-Picciotto, Ph.D.
Chair, Committee on Breast Cancer and
the Environment: The Scientifc Evidence, Research
Methodology, and Future Directions

Introductions by committee members and meeting attendees
8:45 a.m.– 12:00 p.m. Reaching Conclusions About Carcinogenicity
8:45 a.m. Weighing Evidence from NTP Bioassays

John Bucher, Ph.D.
Associate Director, National Toxicology Program


Questions and discussion
9:30 a.m. Evaluation of Human and Experimental Evidence to
Identify Cancer Hazard and Estimate Risk

Kathryn Z. Guyton, Ph.D., D.A.B.T.
Toxicologist, National Center for Environmental
Assessment
Offce of Research and Development, U.S. EPA

Questions and discussion
10:15 a.m. Identifying Breast Carcinogens at IARC

Vincent James Cogliano, Ph.D.
Head, IARC Monographs Program


Questions and discussion
11:00 a.m. How Toxicology Can Advance Breast Cancer
Prevention by Informing Chemicals Policies and
Epidemiologic Study Design

Ruthann Rudel, M.S.
Director of Research, Silent Spring Institute

Questions and discussion
11:45 a.m. General discussion as needed
12:00 p.m. Lunch
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13263.
×
1:00–2:00 p.m. Introduction to Issues in Studying Breast Cancer and the Environment, Committee Presentations Continued
1:00 p.m. An Epidemiologic Perspective on Environmental Risk
Factors

Peggy Reynolds, Ph.D.
Senior Research Scientist, Cancer Prevention
Institute of California

1:30 p.m. Breast Cancer and Environment Research Centers:
Experience and Plans

Robert Hiatt, M.D.
Deputy Director, Helen Diller Family
Comprehensive Cancer Center

2:00–3:00 p.m. Initiatives on Breast Cancer and the Environment: Research Gaps and Policy Proposals
2:00 p.m. The California Breast Cancer Research Program’s
Special Research Initiatives on Environment and
Disparities

Marion (Mhel) Kavanaugh-Lynch, M.D., M.P.H.
Director, California Breast Cancer Research
Program

Questions and discussion
2:30 p.m. Breast Cancer and Chemicals Policy Project

Sarah Janssen, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H.
Senior Scientist, Natural Resources Defense Council

and

Megan Schwarzman, M.D., M.P.H.
Research Scientist, Berkeley Center for Green
Chemistry
School of Public Health, University of California,
Berkeley

Questions and discussion
3:00 p.m. Opportunity for Individual Public Comment
Nancy Bellen, Santa Rosa, CA
Marika Holmgren, Breast Cancer Survivor
Susan Braun, Executive Director, Commonweal
3:30 p.m. Adjourn Open Session
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13263.
×

MEETING 3
Committee on Breast Cancer and the Environment:
The Scientifc Evidence, Research Methodology, and Future Directions

The Keck Center of the National Academies
Washington, DC

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

2:15 p.m. Introductory Remarks

Irva Hertz-Picciotto, Ph.D.
Chair, Committee on Breast Cancer and the
Environment: The Scientifc Evidence, Research
Methodology, and Future Directions

Introductions by committee members and meeting attendees
Opportunity for Sponsor Comment

Amelie Ramirez, Dr.P.H.
Member, Susan G. Komen for the Cure Scientifc
Advisory Board
Director, Institute for Health Promotion Research
University of Texas Health Science Center at San
Antonio

2:30 p.m. Environmental Pollution and Breast Cancer: Adding Epidemiological Studies to Biological Evidence

Julia G. Brody, Ph.D.
Executive Director
Silent Spring Institute

Questions and discussion with the committee
3:15 p.m. Early Life Exposures and Breast Cancer Risk

Michele R. Forman, Ph.D., M.S.
Professor, Department of Epidemiology
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Questions and discussion with the committee
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13263.
×
4:00 p.m. Windows of Susceptibility to Breast Cancer and
Environmental Exposures

Jose Russo, M.D.
Director, Breast Cancer Research Laboratory and
NCI-NIEHS Breast Cancer and the Environment
Research Center
Fox Chase Cancer Center

Questions and discussion with the committee
4:45 p.m. General Discussion as Needed
5:00 p.m. Opportunity for Individual Public Comment
Rebecca Shaloff, Washington, DC
Victoria Pavelko, Reston, VA
Heather Rogers, Alexandria, VA
5:30 p.m. Adjourn Open Session
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13263.
×
Page347
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13263.
×
Page348
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13263.
×
Page349
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13263.
×
Page350
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13263.
×
Page351
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13263.
×
Page352
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13263.
×
Page353
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agendas for Public Meetings." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Breast Cancer and the Environment: A Life Course Approach. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13263.
×
Page354
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Breast cancer remains the most common invasive cancer among women. The primary patients of breast cancer are adult women who are approaching or have reached menopause; 90 percent of new cases in U.S. women in 2009 were diagnosed at age 45 or older. Growing knowledge of the complexity of breast cancer stimulated a transition in breast cancer research toward elucidating how external factors may influence the etiology of breast cancer.

Breast Cancer and the Environment reviews the current evidence on a selection of environmental risk factors for breast cancer, considers gene-environment interactions in breast cancer, and explores evidence-based actions that might reduce the risk of breast cancer. The book also recommends further integrative research into the elements of the biology of breast development and carcinogenesis, including the influence of exposure to a variety of environmental factors during potential windows of susceptibility during the full life course, potential interventions to reduce risk, and better tools for assessing the carcinogenicity of environmental factors. For a limited set of risk factors, evidence suggests that action can be taken in ways that may reduce risk for breast cancer for many women: avoiding unnecessary medical radiation throughout life, avoiding the use of some forms of postmenopausal hormone therapy, avoiding smoking, limiting alcohol consumption, increasing physical activity, and minimizing weight gain.

Breast Cancer and the Environment sets a direction and a focus for future research efforts. The book will be of special interest to medical researchers, patient advocacy groups, and public health professionals.

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