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International Science in the National Interest at the U.S. Geological Survey (2012)

Chapter:Appendix A: USGS and DOI Mission and Authorization Language

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: USGS and DOI Mission and Authorization Language." National Research Council. 2012. International Science in the National Interest at the U.S. Geological Survey. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13302.
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APPENDIX A

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USGS and DOI Mission and Authorization Language

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Creation and Authority

The Geological Survey was established by the Organic Act of March 3, 1879 (20 Stat. 394; 43 U.S.C. 31), which provided for “the classification of the public lands and examination of the geological structure, mineral resources, and products of the national domain.” The Act of September 5, 1962 (76 Stat. 427; 43 U.S.C. 31(b)), expanded this authorization to include such examinations outside the national domain. Topographic mapping and chemical and physical research were recognized as an essential part of the investigations and studies authorized by the Organic Act, and specific provision was made for them by Congress in the Act of October 2, 1888 (25 Stat. 505, 526).

Following the early work on classification of land available for irrigation, provision was made in 1894 for gaging the streams and determining the water supply of the United States (28 Stat. 398). Authorizations for publication, sale, and distribution of material prepared by the Geological Survey are contained in several statutes (43 U.S.C. 41-45; 44 U.S.C. 1318, 1320).1

Mission

The mission of the Geological Survey is to provide geologic, topographic, and hydrologic information that contributes to the wise management of the nation’s natural resources and that promotes the health, safety, and well-being of the people. This information

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1 See www.usgs.gov/usgs-manual/120/120-1.html.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: USGS and DOI Mission and Authorization Language." National Research Council. 2012. International Science in the National Interest at the U.S. Geological Survey. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13302.
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consists of maps, databases, and descriptions and analyses of the water, energy, and mineral resources, land surface, underlying geologic structure, and dynamic processes of the earth.

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

Creation and Authority

On March 3, 1849, the last day of the 30th Congress, a bill was passed to create the Department of the Interior to take charge of the nation’s internal affairs. The DOI is now the nation’s principal Federal conservation agency. It manages many of the nation’s special natural, cultural, and historic places, conserves lands and waters, protects cultural legacies, and keeps the nation’s history alive. Interior manages parks, refuges, public lands and recreation areas for public enjoyment, provides access to many of the nation’s natural resources, increases scientific knowledge, and fulfills America’s trust and other responsibilities to native peoples. Interior also provides hydropower to the Western States. It delivers water to over 31 million citizens through management of 479 dams and 348 reservoirs.2

Mission

The U.S. Department of the Interior protects and manages the nation’s natural resources and cultural heritage; provides scientific and other information about those resources; and honors its trust responsibilities or special commitments to American Indians, Alaska Natives, and affiliated Island Communities.

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2 See www.cr.nps.gov/history/online_books/utley-mackintosh/index.htm.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: USGS and DOI Mission and Authorization Language." National Research Council. 2012. International Science in the National Interest at the U.S. Geological Survey. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13302.
×
Page121
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: USGS and DOI Mission and Authorization Language." National Research Council. 2012. International Science in the National Interest at the U.S. Geological Survey. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13302.
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Page122
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Science at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is intrinsically global, and from early in its history, the USGS has successfully carried out international projects that serve U.S. national interests and benefit the USGS domestic mission. Opportunities abound for the USGS to strategically pursue international science in the next 5-10 years that bears on growing worldwide problems having direct impact on the United States--climate and ecosystem changes, natural disasters, the spread of invasive species, and diminishing natural resources, to name a few. Taking a more coherent, proactive agency approach to international science--and building support for international projects currently in progress-would help the USGS participate in international science activities more effectively.

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