National Academies Press: OpenBook

Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels in the United States (2012)

Chapter:Appendix C: Presentations to the Committee

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2012. Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13437.
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C
Presentations to the Committee

MARCH 17, 2011

Sponsor Perspectives for NRC Study on Algae Biofuels Sustainability

Ron Pate, U.S. Department of Energy

A National Resource Availability Assessment for Microalgae Biofuel Production

Ron Pate, U.S. Department of Energy

Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels Meeting

Richard Greene, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science

ARS Research on Algal Biomass for Environmental Remediation that Is Relevant to Algal Biofuels

Walter Mulbry, U.S. Department of AgricultureAgricultural Reaserch Service

Algae Biofuels and EPA

Mark Segal, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Pollution

Algal Biomass as an Animal Feed Ingredient: Opportunities and Challenges

Terry Proescholdt, U.S. Food and Drug Administration/Center for Veterinary Medicine

Presentation to the National Academy of Sciences–Committee on Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels

Jim Sears and Mary Rosenthal, Algae Biomass Organization

Opportunities for Improving Environmental Quality and Enhancing Natural Resource Base Provided by Algal Biofuels

Greg Mitchell, Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2012. Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13437.
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JUNE 13, 2011

Sustainable Algal Biofuels

Richard Sayre, Danforth Center and Phycal, LLC

Microalgal Strains for Fuel: Starting Points and Cultivation Specifications

Peter Lammers, New Mexico State University

Oil From Algae–Greens, Diatoms, and Dinoflagellates Accumulate High Oil Levels

Art Grossman, Carnegie Institute of Washington

Genetic Engineering and Sustainable Algal Biofuels

Gary Sayler, University of Tennessee

Strain Selection for Algal Biofuels in Open Ponds: Ecological and Evolutionary Considerations

Allison Snow, The Ohio State University

Promises to Keep?

Phil Pienkos, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Scaling Algal Biofuels Resource and Sustainability Challenges End-User and Investor Perspective

Evan Smith, Verno Systems Incorporated

A Cyanobacteria-Based Photosynthetic Process for the Production of Ethanol

Ron Chance, Algenol Biofuels

Algal Production and Processing

Gail Busch, Algepower

Near-Term Commercialization of Algal Biofuel

Alex Aravanis, Sapphire Energy

The Algae to Fuels Value Chain

Jim Rekoske, UOP Honeywell

Life Cycle Assessment of Algae-to-Energy Technologies

Andres Clarens, University of Virginia

Life Cycle Analysis of Algae-Based Fuels with the GREET Model

Ed Frank, Argonne National Laboratory

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2012. Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13437.
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JUNE 14, 2011

Promise and Challenges in Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels: Questions and Answers

John Benemann, Benemann Associations

Challenges in Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels–Looking Back and Forward

John Sheehan, University of Minnesota

Resource Constraints on Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels

Mark Wigmosta, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Bioenergy: The Need for Additional Carbon

Tim Searchinger, Princeton University

Environmental Effects of Large-Scale Algal Fuel Production

Virginia Dale, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Environmental Sustainability Concerns for Algal-Based Biofuel Production

Gary Schafran, Old Dominion University

SEPTEMBER 8, 2011

Genome-Scale Network Analysis: Illuminating Photosynthetic Metabolism in the Alga Chlamydomonas

Jason Papin, University of Virginia

Algal Strain Selection and Development for Biofuel Production

Paul Roessler, Synthetic Genomics

An Assessment of the Environmental Performance of Algal Biofuels

David Marler, ExxonMobil

Algae and Fish: Food, Fuel, and More

Lissa Morgenthaler-Jones, LiveFuels

End User’s Perspective of Sustainability of Algal Biofuels

Michael Lakeman, Boeing Commercial Airplanes

Species Invasion and Large-Scale Algae Cultivation

Jonathan Shurin, University of California, San Diego

Offshore Membrane Enclosure for Growing Algae

Jonathan Trent, National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center

Social Acceptability of Large-Scale Algal Biofuel Production

Robert Beach, RTI International

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2012. Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13437.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2012. Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13437.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2012. Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13437.
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Page218
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2012. Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13437.
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Page219
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Presentations to the Committee." National Research Council. 2012. Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13437.
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Page220
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Biofuels made from algae are gaining attention as a domestic source of renewable fuel. However, with current technologies, scaling up production of algal biofuels to meet even 5 percent of U.S. transportation fuel needs could create unsustainable demands for energy, water, and nutrient resources. Continued research and development could yield innovations to address these challenges, but determining if algal biofuel is a viable fuel alternative will involve comparing the environmental, economic and social impacts of algal biofuel production and use to those associated with petroleum-based fuels and other fuel sources. Sustainable Development of Algal Biofuels was produced at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy.

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