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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Post-Incident Recovery Considerations of the Health Care Service Delivery Infrastructure: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13442.
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B

Agenda

SESSION DESCRIPTION

Well beyond the initial response to a disaster, the long-term recovery of the health care service delivery infrastructure requires a broad public-private partnership. This long-term recovery is facilitated primarily through FEMA and in conjunction with HHS’s ESF #8 responsibilities. This town hall session will allow participants an opportunity to engage representatives from federal, state, and local governments, emergency management and public health, and the nonprofit and private sectors to identify services necessary to maintain or improve the affected health care service delivery infrastructure to ensure it meets the long-term physical and behavioral health needs of affected populations. The town hall session will also engage state and local authorities in a dialog around their needs and will be an opportunity for input about how these needs can potentially be addressed through the relevant ESF policies and guidance documents. The discussions will highlight lessons learned from previous disasters, and identify priorities for pre-incident operational plans, with a specific focus on opportunities to leverage programs and activities across the public, private, and nonprofit sectors that support long-term recovery and mass casualty care.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

•  Identify services necessary to maintain or improve the affected health care service delivery infrastructure to ensure it meets the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Post-Incident Recovery Considerations of the Health Care Service Delivery Infrastructure: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13442.
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    long-term physical and behavioral health needs of affected populations.

•  Discuss the roles and functions of the relevant emergency support functions in facilitating long-term recovery of the health care service delivery infrastructure.

•  Highlight lessons learned from previous disasters, and identify priorities for pre-incident operational plans, with a specific focus on opportunities to leverage programs and activities across the public, private, and nonprofit sectors that support long-term recovery and mass casualty care.

Lynne Kidder, Session Chair

President

Bipartisan WMD Terrorism Research Center

Panelists:

Deborah Ingram

Assistant Administrator

Recovery Directorate

Office of Response & Recovery

DHS/FEMA

Kevin Yeskey

Deputy Assistant Secretary

HHS/ASPR

Josh Riff

Medical Director

Target

Linda MacIntyre

National Chair, Red Cross Nursing

Assistant Clinical Professor, UCSF

James Craig

Director, Office of Health Protection

Mississippi State Department of Health

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Post-Incident Recovery Considerations of the Health Care Service Delivery Infrastructure: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13442.
×
Page21
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2012. Post-Incident Recovery Considerations of the Health Care Service Delivery Infrastructure: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13442.
×
Page22
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Health systems and assets are a large part of the critical infrastructure of any community and are vital not only for the safety and well-being of its citizens, but also for the economic vitality, quality of life, and livelihood of the entire community. As part of its ongoing mission to foster dialogue among stakeholders and to confront the challenges inherent in ensuring the nation's health security, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events sponsored a town hall session at the 2012 Public Health Preparedness Summit. This event took place February 21-24 in Anaheim, California.

In this session sponsored by the IOM, the focus of discussion was sustaining health care delivery beyond the initial response to a disaster and facilitating the full long-term recovery of the local health care delivery systems. Many elements required for recovery are also fundamental to the day-to-day operations of these systems. Investing in improved health care delivery systems, both financially and through collaborative capacity building, can enhance economic development and growth before a disaster, and also prove instrumental in sustaining services and recovering after a disaster.

Post-Incident Recovery Considerations of the Health Care Service Delivery Infrastructure serves as a summary of the session and explains the value of regional capacity building; the importance of interagency, intergovernmental, and public-private collaboration; and the significant role that health care coalitions can play in ensuring resilient communities and national health security.

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