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Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing? (2013)

Chapter:Appendix: Summary of Relevant Surveys Administered by the U.S. Department of Education

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Summary of Relevant Surveys Administered by the U.S. Department of Education." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
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APPENDIX

SUMMARY OF RELEVANT SURVEYS ADMINISTERED BY THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Survey and URL Description/ Focus Respondents Frequency of Administration How Data Are Compiled Most Recent Data Collection Next Expected Data Collection
Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Study (B&B:2008)

http://nces.ed.​gov/surveys/b&b/
Students’ education and work experiences after they complete a bachelor’s degree; special emphasis on the experiences of new elementary and secondary teachers Nationally representative cohort of students who obtained a bachelor’s degree in 2008 Cohort surveyed in 2009 (1st year out of college) and in 2012 (3rd year out of college) Data tables available; too early for in-depth analysis 2012 Unknown
Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:04)

http://nces.ed.gov​/surveys/bps/
Student persistence in postsecondary education programs, their transition to employment, and demographic characteristics Nationally representative cohort of students who entered postsecondary education in 2004 Cohort surveyed in 2004 (at the end of their 1st academic year), in 2006 (end of their 3rd academic year), and 2009 (end of their 6th academic year) Data tables available; occasional use in analysis of community colleges (including 2009, 2008, 2007) 2009 Unknown
Civil Rights Data Collection (CRDC)

http://ocrdata​.ed.gov/
Information relating to providing equal educational opportunity, such as student enrollment and educational programs and services available Survey of 100 percent of schools in a representative sample of districts across the country Every 2 years Data tables available; primarily used by the Office of Civil Rights for enforcement efforts 2011-2012 2013-2014
Common Core of Data (CCD)

http://nces.ed.​gov/ccd/
General descriptive information on schools and school districts, data on students and staff, and fiscal data State education agencies respond from their own records Annually Used annually in reports of state and district finances, teacher compensation, and high school completion 2011-2012 (most recent available for release 2008-2009) 2012-2013
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Summary of Relevant Surveys Administered by the U.S. Department of Education." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
×
Survey and URL Description/Focus Respondents Frequency of Administration How Data Are Compiled Most Recent Data Collection Next Expected Data Collection
Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten (ECLS-K:2011)

http://nces.ed​.gov/ecls/
Assessment of how childhood, parent, school, and community factors affect childhood development, early learning, and school progress Students, parents, and teachers of a nationally representative cohort of elementary school students in kindergarten in 2011 Cohort surveyed in kindergarten (2010-2011), 1st grade (2011-2012), 2nd grade (2013), 3rd grade (2014), 4th grade (2015), and 5th grade (2016) Data tables available; occasional analysis of elementary school instruction, or trends in racial and ethnic groups (e.g., 2010, 2007, 2006) 2012 2013
High School Longitudinal Study (HSLS:09) When and how students decide on secondary courses, choose among postsecondary options, and consider which career(s) to pursue Cohort of 9th grade students, their parents, math and science teachers, school counselors, and school administrators Cohort surveyed in 2009 (9th grade), 2012 (11th grade), 2013/2014 (end of secondary education) and 2015 (2 years after secondary school) Data tables available; too early for in-depth analysis 2012 collection (in 11th grade) 2013/2014 (end of secondary education)
National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)–Background Questionnaires in Mathematics and Science

http://nces.ed.gov/​nationsreportcard/
Background questionnaires for students, teachers, and schools to provide contextual information that explains NAEP achievement data Students, teachers (including special and bilingual education), and principals in grades 4, 8, and 12 in schools of a nationally representative sample Every 2 years for mathematics, every 4 years for science The Nation’s Report Card, various studies of achievement gaps, charter and private schools, students with disabilities, and English language learners 2011 for mathematics and science 2013 for mathematics, 2015 for science
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Summary of Relevant Surveys Administered by the U.S. Department of Education." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
×
Survey and URL Description/Focus Respondents Frequency of Administration How Data Are Compiled Most Recent Data Collection Next Expected Data Collection
National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)–Technology and Engineering Literacy

http://nces.ed.gov​/nationsreportcard/
Continuing assessment of what America’s students know and can do in engineering and technology Students in grades 4, 8, and 12 in schools of a nationally representative sample Every 2 years The Nation’s Report Card, various studies of achievement gaps, charter and private schools, students with disabilities, and English language learners Under development 2014
National Education Longitudinal Study (ELS:2002)

http://nces.ed.gov​/surveys/els2002/
Assessment of how achievement, interest, and aspirations in high school affect outcomes in higher education and in the workforce Students, parents, teachers, librarians, and schools of a nationally representative cohort of high school students in 10th grade in 2002 Cohort surveyed in 2002 (10th grade), in 2004 (12th grade), in 2006 (2nd year out of high school), and 2012 (8th year out of high school) Data tables available; occasional analysis of high school seniors and those who drop out (e.g., 2009, 2008) 2012 Unknown
National Household Education Surveys (NHES)

http://nces.ed.​gov/nhes/
Early childhood development, school choice decisions, parent and family involvement, and postsecondary planning activities of school-aged children and their families A survey of a representative sample of households across the country Every 2 years (no 2009 data available as the survey was designed) Regular use in analysis of adult education, before- and after-school activities, and family involvement in education 2012 2014
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Summary of Relevant Surveys Administered by the U.S. Department of Education." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
×
Survey and URL Description/Focus Respondents Frequency of Administration How Data Are Compiled Most Recent Data Collection Next Expected Data Collection
Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS)

http://nces.ed.gov​/surveys/sass/
Four interrelated surveys: school, teacher, principal, and school district questionnaires provide descriptive data on the context of elementary and secondary education. Topics include teacher demand, teacher and principal characteristics, general conditions in schools, and teacher compensation A survey of a representative sample of schools across the country Every 4 years Regular use in analysis of school safety, and school libraries 2011-2012 2015-2016
Schools and Staffing Survey–Principal Follow-up Survey (PFS)

http://nces.ed.gov​/surveys/sass/
Principal retention and mobility Survey sent to the principal of every school selected for the previous year’s SASS Every 4 years, in the year following the SASS Data tables available; occasional use in analysis of principal attrition 2008-2009 2012-2013
Schools and Staffing Survey–Teacher Follow-up Survey (TFS)

http://nces.ed.gov​/surveys/sass/
Teacher retention, teaching status and assignments, and information on decisions to change schools Survey sent to the principal of every school selected for the previous year’s SASS Every 4 years Regular use in analysis of teacher attrition and teacher qualifications 2008-2009 2012-2013
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Summary of Relevant Surveys Administered by the U.S. Department of Education." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
×
Page50
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Summary of Relevant Surveys Administered by the U.S. Department of Education." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
×
Page51
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Summary of Relevant Surveys Administered by the U.S. Department of Education." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
×
Page52
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Summary of Relevant Surveys Administered by the U.S. Department of Education." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
×
Page53
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Following a 2011 report by the National Research Council (NRC) on successful K-12 education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), Congress asked the National Science Foundation to identify methods for tracking progress toward the report's recommendations. In response, the NRC convened the Committee on an Evaluation Framework for Successful K-12 STEM Education to take on this assignment. The committee developed 14 indicators linked to the 2011 report's recommendations. By providing a focused set of key indicators related to students' access to quality learning, educator's capacity, and policy and funding initiatives in STEM, the committee addresses the need for research and data that can be used to monitor progress in K-12 STEM education and make informed decisions about improving it.

The recommended indicators provide a framework for Congress and relevant deferral agencies to create and implement a national-level monitoring and reporting system that: assesses progress toward key improvements recommended by a previous National Research Council (2011) committee; measures student knowledge, interest, and participation in the STEM disciplines and STEM-related activities; tracks financial, human capital, and material investments in K-12 STEM education at the federal, state, and local levels; provides information about the capabilities of the STEM education workforce, including teachers and principals; and facilitates strategic planning for federal investments in STEM education and workforce development when used with labor force projections. All 14 indicators explained in this report are intended to form the core of this system. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing? summarizes the 14 indicators and tracks progress towards the initial report's recommendations.

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