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Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This report has been made possible by the important contributions of many individuals and organizations. First, we acknowledge the sponsorship of the National Science Foundation, and especially the steadfast support of Janice Earle, program director in the Education and Human Resources Directorate.

The committee also thanks the National Research Council (NRC) staff of the Board on Science Education and the Board on Testing and Assessment who worked on this project: board directors Martin Storksdieck and Stuart Elliott for providing valuable oversight and general wisdom during the committee deliberations and report writing; senior program officer Natalie Nielsen, who served as the study director, for her superb accomplishments and tireless efforts in taking the committee’s ruminations and transforming them into coherent prose; and program associate Rebecca Krone for her unparalleled organizing skills and consummate professionalism. We also thank Mac Hird for providing research assistance during his summer internship, and NRC staff Eugenia Grohman for editing the report, Kirsten Sampson Snyder for shepherding it through the review process, and Yvonne Wise for facilitating its production.

This report has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the NRC’s Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published report as sound as possible and to ensure that the report meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the deliberative process.

We thank the following individuals for their review of this report: Elaine Allensworth, Chicago Consortium of School Research, The University of Chicago; Deborah Loewenberg Ball, School of Education and Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan; William B. Bridges, School of Engineering, Emeritus, California Institute of Technology; Gail Burd, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Arizona; Margaret E. Goertz, Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania; Joan Herman, Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing, University of California, Los Angeles; John G. Hildebrand, Department of Neuroscience, School of Mind, Brain, and Behavior, University of Arizona; Sharon Lohr, Survey Methods Unit, Westat, Rockville, Maryland; Jonathan Osborne, Graduate School of Education, Stanford University; Steven A. Schneider, Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, WestEd, Redwood City, California; Jerry D. Valadez, Central Valley Science Project, California State University, Fresno; Matthias Von Davier, Research and Development Division, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey; Iris R. Weiss, Office of President, Horizon Research, Inc., Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
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Although the reviewers listed have provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the conclusions or recommendations nor did they see the final draft of the report before its release. The review of this report was overseen by Stephen E. Fienberg, Department of Statistics, Carnegie Mellon University, and Lauress L. Wise, Education Policy Impact Center, HumRRO, Monterey, California. Appointed by the NRC, they were responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this report was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this report rests entirely with the authoring committee and the institution.

Adam Gamoran, Chair
Committee on the Evaluation Framework for
Successful K-12 STEM Education

Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
×

BOARD ON SCIENCE EDUCATION
2012-2013

HELEN QUINN (Chair), Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University (Emerita)

GEORGE BOGGS, Palomar College and American Association of Community Colleges (Emeritus)

RODOLFO DIRZO, Department of Biology, Stanford University

JOSEPH FRANCISCO, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana

MARGARET HONEY, New York Hall of Science, Queens, New York

SUSAN W. KIEFFER, Department of Geology, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

BRIAN REISER, School of Education and Social Policy, Northwestern University

SUZANNE WILSON, Department of Teacher Education and Center for the Scholarship of Teaching, Michigan State University

MARTIN STORKSDIECK, Director

HEIDI A. SCHWEINGRUBER, Deputy Director

MICHAEL FEDER, Senior Program Officer (on leave with the Office of Science Technology Policy, The White House)

MARGARET HILTON, Senior Program Officer

THOMAS E. KELLER, Senior Program Officer

NATALIE NIELSEN, Senior Program Officer

REBECCA KRONE, Program Associate

ANTHONY BROWN, Senior Program Assistant

Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
×

BOARD ON TESTING AND ASSESSMENT

EDWARD HAERTEL (Chair), School of Education, Stanford University

LYLE BACHMAN, Department of Applied Linguistics and TESOL, University of California, Los Angeles

STEPHEN DUNBAR, College of Education, University of Iowa

MARK DYNARSKI, Pemberton Research, LLC, East Windsor, New Jersey

DAVID J. FRANCIS, Texas Institute for Measurement, Evaluation, and Statistics, University of Houston

JOAN L. HERMAN, National Center for Research on Evaluation, Standards, and Student Testing, University of California, Los Angeles

MICHAEL KANE, Test Validity, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey

ROBERT D. MARE, Department of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles

MICHAEL NETTLES, Policy Evaluation and Research Center, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey

DIANA C. PULLIN, School of Education, Boston College

ANN MARIE RYAN, Department of Psychology, Michigan State University

BRIAN STECHER, Education Program, The RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, California

MARK R. WILSON, Graduate School of Education, University of California, Berkeley

REBECCA ZWICK, Research and Development, Educational Testing Service, Santa Barbara, California

STUART ELLIOTT, Director

ALIX BEATTY, Senior Program Officer

JUDY KOENIG, Senior Program Officer

KELLY IVERSON, Senior Program Assistant

Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
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Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
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Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
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Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
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Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
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Suggested Citation:"Acknowledgments." National Research Council. 2013. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing?. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/13509.
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Following a 2011 report by the National Research Council (NRC) on successful K-12 education in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM), Congress asked the National Science Foundation to identify methods for tracking progress toward the report's recommendations. In response, the NRC convened the Committee on an Evaluation Framework for Successful K-12 STEM Education to take on this assignment. The committee developed 14 indicators linked to the 2011 report's recommendations. By providing a focused set of key indicators related to students' access to quality learning, educator's capacity, and policy and funding initiatives in STEM, the committee addresses the need for research and data that can be used to monitor progress in K-12 STEM education and make informed decisions about improving it.

The recommended indicators provide a framework for Congress and relevant deferral agencies to create and implement a national-level monitoring and reporting system that: assesses progress toward key improvements recommended by a previous National Research Council (2011) committee; measures student knowledge, interest, and participation in the STEM disciplines and STEM-related activities; tracks financial, human capital, and material investments in K-12 STEM education at the federal, state, and local levels; provides information about the capabilities of the STEM education workforce, including teachers and principals; and facilitates strategic planning for federal investments in STEM education and workforce development when used with labor force projections. All 14 indicators explained in this report are intended to form the core of this system. Monitoring Progress Toward Successful K-12 STEM Education: A Nation Advancing? summarizes the 14 indicators and tracks progress towards the initial report's recommendations.

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