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Suggested Citation:"REFERENCES." National Research Council. 1991. Mathematical Sciences, Technology, and Economic Competitiveness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1786.
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REFERENCES

[1] Economic Report of the President: Annual Report of the Council of Economic Advisors. U.S. Government Printing Office, January 1989, p. 320.

[2] Peter Passel. ''Adding up the World Trade Talks: Fail Now, Pay Later,'' New York Times, Section 4, December 16, 1990.

[3] Edmund Faltermayer. "Is 'Made in the U.S.A' Fading Away?," Fortune , 122, No. 7, September 24, 1990, pp. 62–73.

[4] Michael L. Dertouzos, Richard K. Lester, Robert M. Solow, and the MIT Commission on Industrial Productivity. Made in America: Regaining the Productive Edge. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass., 1989.

[5] James Brian Quinn. "Technology in Services: Past Myths and Future Challenges," in Technology in Services, Bruce R. Guile and James Brian Quinn, eds. National Academy of Engineering, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 1988.

[6] A Strategic Industry at Risk. A Report to the President and the Congress from the National Advisory Committee on Semiconductors. Ian M. Ross, chairman, November 1989.

[7] Wenjie Dong, Mark Jeffrey Emanuel, Phillip Bording, and Norman Bleistein. A Computer Implementation of 2.5D Common Shot Inversion . Report CWP-090P. Center for Wave Phenomena, Department of Mathematical and Computer Sciences, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colo., October 1990.

Suggested Citation:"REFERENCES." National Research Council. 1991. Mathematical Sciences, Technology, and Economic Competitiveness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1786.
×

[8] "A New Era for Auto Quality," Business Week, October 22, 1990, pp. 84–96.

[9] The Technological Dimensions of International Competitiveness. A Report to the Council of the National Academy of Engineering. Committee on Technology Issues That Impact International Competitiveness. Washington, D.C., 1988, pp. 23 ff.

[10] Judy P. Lewent. "The Finances of Doing Something About Health," MIT Management, Fall 1988, pp. 20–24.

[11] Amal Kumar Naj. "In R & D, the Next Best Thing to a Gut Feeling," Wall Street Journal, May 21, 1990, p. A9.

[12] S. Myers. "The New Look of Capital Spending," Fortune, March 13, 1989, pp. 115–120.

[13] Tamar Schlick. "A Modular Strategy for Generating Starting Conformations and Data Structures for Polynucleotide Helices for Potential Energy Calculations," Journal of Computational Chemistry, 9, 1988, 861–889.

[14] Adel Faridani, Erik L. Ritman, and Kennan T. Smith. "Local Tomography," SIAM Journal of Applied Mathematics, 1991, in press.

[15] R. Ellson and D. Cox. "Visualization of Injection Molding," Simulation, 51, No. 5, 184–188, November 1988.

[16] G. Chesshire and W. D. Henshaw. "Composite Overlapping Meshes for the Solution of Partial Differential Equations," Journal of Computational Physics, 90, 1–64, September 1990.

[17] Aviation Safety Commission. Final Report and Recommendations, Vol. 1. The White House, Washington, D.C., April 1988.

[18] Curriculum and Evaluation Standards for School Mathematics. National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Reston, Va., March 1989.

[19] Renewing U.S. Mathematics: Critical Resource for the Future. Ad Hoc Committee on Resources for the Mathematical Sciences. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 1984.

Suggested Citation:"REFERENCES." National Research Council. 1991. Mathematical Sciences, Technology, and Economic Competitiveness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1786.
×

[20] Renewing U.S. Mathematics: A Plan for the 1990s. Committee on the Mathematical Sciences: Status and Future Directions. Board on Mathematical Sciences. National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 1990.

[21] The Federal High Performance Computing Program. Office of Science and Technology Policy, The White House, Washington, D.C., September 8, 1989.

Suggested Citation:"REFERENCES." National Research Council. 1991. Mathematical Sciences, Technology, and Economic Competitiveness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1786.
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Page96
Suggested Citation:"REFERENCES." National Research Council. 1991. Mathematical Sciences, Technology, and Economic Competitiveness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1786.
×
Page97
Suggested Citation:"REFERENCES." National Research Council. 1991. Mathematical Sciences, Technology, and Economic Competitiveness. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1786.
×
Page98
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This book describes the contributions of mathematics to the nation's advanced technology and to economic competitiveness. Examples from five industries—aircraft, petroleum, automotive, semiconductor, and telecommunications—illustrate how mathematics enters into and improves industry.

Mathematical Sciences, Technology, and Economic Competitiveness addresses these high-technology industries and breadth of mathematical endeavors in the United States as they materially contribute to the technology base from which innovation in these industries flows. The book represents a serious attempt by the mathematics community to bring about an awareness by policymakers of the pervasive influence of mathematics in everyday life.

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