National Academies Press: OpenBook

Mapping the Brain and Its Functions: Integrating Enabling Technologies into Neuroscience Research (1991)

Chapter:Appendix C: Lists of Speakers and Demonstrators in Symposia and Open Hearings

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Lists of Speakers and Demonstrators in Symposia and Open Hearings." Institute of Medicine. 1991. Mapping the Brain and Its Functions: Integrating Enabling Technologies into Neuroscience Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1816.
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C

Lists of Speakers and Demonstrators in Symposia and Open Hearings

Neuroscience Symposium and Open Hearing

National Academy of Sciences

Washington, D.C.

June 15, 1990

CARLA J. SHATZ

Stanford University School of Medicine

“Correlated neural activity and visual system development”

RICHARD J. ROBERTS

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

“Predictive sequence motifs in proteins”

GORDON SHEPHERD *

Yale University School of Medicine

Open Hearing: “Creating a national neuroscience resource”

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Lists of Speakers and Demonstrators in Symposia and Open Hearings." Institute of Medicine. 1991. Mapping the Brain and Its Functions: Integrating Enabling Technologies into Neuroscience Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1816.
×
Washington Computer Demonstrations

WARREN YOUNG

Scripps Clinic & Research Foundation

STEVE WERTHEIM

Harvard University

STEVE GREENBERG, WALLY WELKER

University of Wisconsin

ARTHUR TOGA

University of California, Los Angeles

Neuroscience Symposium and Open Hearing

University of California

San Francisco

June 26, 1990

ROBERT L. MACDONALD

University of Michigan

“Regulation of single channel properties of native and cloned GABA A receptors”

ROBERT LANGRIDGE

University of California, San Francisco

“Computational molecular biology”

DAVID VAN ESSEN *

California Institute of Technology

Open Hearing: “Creating a national neuroscience resource”

San Francisco Computer Demonstrations

WARREN YOUNG

Scripps Clinic & Research Foundation

ARTHUR TOGA

University of California, Los Angeles

JONATHAN NISSANOV

Drexel University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Lists of Speakers and Demonstrators in Symposia and Open Hearings." Institute of Medicine. 1991. Mapping the Brain and Its Functions: Integrating Enabling Technologies into Neuroscience Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1816.
×
Neuroscience Symposium and Open Hearing

Northwestern University

Chicago, Illinois

July 12, 1990

CHRISTOF KOCH

California Institute of Technology

“Computing optical flow in men, monkeys, and machines”

PETER L. PEARSON

The Johns Hopkins University

“The development and implementation of databases for mapping the human genome”

DONALD WOODWARD*

University of Texas Health Science Center

Open Hearing: “Creating a national neuroscience resource”

Chicago Computer Demonstrations

STEVE WERTHEIM

Harvard University

ARTHUR TOGA

University of California, Los Angeles

STEVE GREENBERG

University of Wisconsin

JONATHAN NISSANOV

Drexel University

* Member, Institute of Medicine Committee on a National Neural Circuitry Database.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Lists of Speakers and Demonstrators in Symposia and Open Hearings." Institute of Medicine. 1991. Mapping the Brain and Its Functions: Integrating Enabling Technologies into Neuroscience Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1816.
×
This page in the original is blank.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Lists of Speakers and Demonstrators in Symposia and Open Hearings." Institute of Medicine. 1991. Mapping the Brain and Its Functions: Integrating Enabling Technologies into Neuroscience Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1816.
×
Page139
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Lists of Speakers and Demonstrators in Symposia and Open Hearings." Institute of Medicine. 1991. Mapping the Brain and Its Functions: Integrating Enabling Technologies into Neuroscience Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1816.
×
Page140
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Lists of Speakers and Demonstrators in Symposia and Open Hearings." Institute of Medicine. 1991. Mapping the Brain and Its Functions: Integrating Enabling Technologies into Neuroscience Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1816.
×
Page141
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Lists of Speakers and Demonstrators in Symposia and Open Hearings." Institute of Medicine. 1991. Mapping the Brain and Its Functions: Integrating Enabling Technologies into Neuroscience Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1816.
×
Page142
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Significant advances in brain research have been made, but investigators who face the resulting explosion of data need new methods to integrate the pieces of the "brain puzzle." Based on the expertise of more than 100 neuroscientists and computer specialists, this new volume examines how computer technology can meet that need.

Featuring outstanding color photography, the book presents an overview of the complexity of brain research, which covers the spectrum from human behavior to genetic mechanisms. Advances in vision, substance abuse, pain, and schizophrenia are highlighted.

The committee explores the potential benefits of computer graphics, database systems, and communications networks in neuroscience and reviews the available technology. Recommendations center on a proposed Brain Mapping Initiative, with an agenda for implementation and a look at issues such as privacy and accessibility.

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