National Academies Press: OpenBook

Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence (2013)

Chapter: Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
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Appendix B

Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts

Below are descriptions of NGA’s science and geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) positions and educational requirements (Table B.1) provided by NGA.

GEOINT Analyst (Aeronautical)—acquire, analyze, and evaluate source and imagery in order to produce aeronautical products and mission-specific data in support of safety of navigation and national security requirements. They ensure the quality, accuracy, and currency of aeronautical information produced in-house, by contractors, and by national and international co-producers. They ensure the quality of aeronautical databases and products in accordance with ISO 9001 certification requirements.

GEOINT Analyst (Aeronautical lntelligence)—analyze and exploit worldwide aeronautical source and imagery in support of safety of navigation and national intelligence goals and requirements. They collaborate with partners and co-producers across the Department of Defense and the intelligence community to ensure that current navigation and intelligence information is available in databases and products. These analysts apply international certification standards to ensure the quality, accuracy, and currency of products and information.

GEOINT Analyst (Analytic Methodologist)—apply mathematical techniques for spatiotemporal analysis to solve complex military and intelligence problems in support of national security. They use analytic tools and techniques such as geographic information systems (GIS), quantitative methods and data visualization, modeling, systems analysis, comparative analysis, and database development. They provide technical input into the development, evaluation, use, and deployment of solutions and improvements to optimize GEOINT analysis and production. They also educate management and analysts in quantitative methods as they apply to GEOINT analysis.

GEOINT Analyst (Bathymetry)—receive, analyze, and deconflict U.S. and foreign bathymetric data (both digital and analog) for use by the intelligence community and external customers. They populate and maintain data and metadata in the bathymetry database, ensuring the accuracy of metadata pertaining to collection source platforms and depth recording devices.

GEOINT Analyst (Cartography)—acquire, analyze, compile, evaluate, and review geospatial data for use in standard products, nonstandard products, and/or data holdings in support of mission requirements. They attribute, exploit, extract, format, manipulate, position, and symbolize geospatial information. They ensure the quality, accuracy, and currency of geospatial information produced in-house or in cooperation with contractors and national and international co-producers for national, military, and civil partners.

GEOINT Analyst (Foundation Strategies)—collaborate with customers and source providers to manage tasking, collection, dissemination, and reporting

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
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related functions. They utilize unique systems and processes to support all mapping, charting, and geodesy global programs and products and operational and strategic requirements. They develop and coordinate tailored strategies within the intelligence community, create and adjudicate tasking and dissemination requirements for diverse customers, analyze and investigate collection performance for mapping, charting, and geodesy-specific data from commercial, national technical means, and other sources, and advise customers in support of the National System for Geospatial-Intelligence.

GEOINT Analyst (Geodetic Earth Sciences)—analyze the Earth’s gravity and magnetic fields, geophysical structure, material properties, and dynamics for geospatial intelligence and Department of Defense applications. They define and maintain the World Geodetic System (WGS), perform datum transformations between WGS 84 and local datums, and develop spatial and temporal models defining Earth systems. They provide in-depth technical expertise on geodetic and geophysical issues to internal and external customers and represent NGA in external community forums establishing Department of Defense and intelligence community doctrine and policy.

GEOINT Analyst (Geodetic Orbit Sciences)—apply orbital mechanics and network systems analysis to acquire, process, and analyze satellite data. They develop, evaluate, and use algorithms and tools to provide integrity monitoring and determine precise ephemerides and other information. They analyze satellite ranging and timing information in order to identify anomalies in both real-time and post-fit scenarios. These analysts handle technical and logistical details pertinent to remote command and control of a worldwide network of satellite tracking stations. They provide in-depth technical expertise on satellite issues to internal and external customers, and represent NGA in external community forums establishing Department of Defense and intelligence community doctrine and policy.

GEOINT Analyst (Geodetic Survey)—solve three-dimensional geodetic and astronomic positional problems, determine geodetic and astronomic azimuths, and measure fluctuations and accelerations in the Earth’s magnetic and gravity fields. They serve as NGA’s primary ground-based data collectors and use and maintain a variety of geodetic and geophysical survey equipment to support data acquisition. They compute, adjust, and evaluate geodetic survey data acquired by other organizations. They provide technical expertise on geodetic and geophysical issues to customers and represent NGA in external community forums that establish Department of Defense and intelligence community doctrine and policy.

GEOINT Analyst (Geospatial Analysis)—produce intelligence products using geospatial methodologies and spatiotemporal data derived from imagery, intelligence databases, and other sources in support of national security. They are intelligence analysts who use their understanding of geographic information science and technology, spatial thinking, remote sensing, GIS, intelligence issues, and the social and physical sciences to create information, characterize events, and discover relationships and trends. They produce descriptive and predictive analyses and communicate findings as written, visual, and/or oral geospatial intelligence.

GEOINT Analyst ( Geospatial Data Stewardship)—manage the generation, approval, and population of data within NGA’s geospatial databases, ensuring that they can be used to satisfy customer requirements. They have read/write access to relevant databases, and make qualitative decisions about the data. They understand the capabilities and limitations of relevant database systems. They have a wide range of product/ data knowledge and understand the capabilities of the relevant systems to support the extraction, analysis, and finishing of in-house, co-production, commodity, and contract data.

GEOINT Analyst (Imagery lntelligence)—task and exploit imagery of all types in support of national and military security goals, concerns, and strategies. They conduct multi-INT research, populate intelligence databases, and produce written, graphic, and oral intelligence products. These analysts primarily analyze military force structure, capabilities, intentions, and vulnerabilities of adversaries and potential adversaries, weapons proliferation, emerging technologies, and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
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treaty monitoring. They also work on diverse issues such as environmental concerns, counternarcotics, disaster assessments, infrastructure, underground facilities, and counterterrorism.

GEOINT Analyst (Imagery Science)—apply advanced techniques to determine the intelligence and geospatial information contained in imagery. They develop algorithms, evaluate tools, and create customized methodologies and products to address a variety of geospatial intelligence problems. They typically specialize in precision mensuration, radar, spectral, infrared, and other specialized collection systems.

GEOINT Analyst (Infrared Source Analysis)—specialize in metric reconstruction, trajectory analysis, and assessment of activity using nonliteral, infrared data from persistent geospatial intelligence sources to support characterization of foreign weapon system performance, counterproliferation, battlespace awareness, and other intelligence issues. The analysts apply their understanding of weapon systems, spatial and temporal reconstruction, error analysis, signature interpretation, sensor phenomenology, and orbital mechanics to help solve intelligence issues in accordance with the national intelligence priority framework. They communicate the meaning and significance of their analysis as written, visual, and/or oral geospatial intelligence.

GEOINT Analyst (Lidar Image Science)—analyze point cloud data to derive intelligence and geospatial information. They conduct feature extraction, characterize partially obscured objects, and perform change detection to support or extend analysis. They develop algorithms, evaluate tools, and create customized lidar methodologies to address a variety of geospatial intelligence problems.

GEOINT Analyst (Maritime)—acquire, analyze, compile, and disseminate maritime safety information and intelligence to populate and update nautical databases to support the digital nautical chart, hardcopy charts, digital publications, and electronic chart display and information systems. They generate missionspecific data and products, promulgate worldwide navigational warnings, and respond to queries from foreign hydrographic offices and the users of NGA products and services. These duties are performed in fulfillment of the agency’s marine navigation obligations under U.S. Code, Title 10, other federal and international laws and regulations, in support of national security goals, concerns, and strategies.

GEOINT Analyst (Nautical Cartography )—acquire, analyze, evaluate, and compile nautical products and mission-specific data in support of mission requirements and navigation safety. They evaluate information from a variety of sources to include foreign nautical charts, foreign notice to mariners, imagery, bathymetry, publications, ship reports, and other forms of geospatial intelligence against current NGA hydrographic data holdings. They ensure the quality, accuracy, and currency of nautical information produced either in-house or in cooperation with contractors and national and international co-producers for national, military, and civil customers.

GEOINT Analyst (Open Source Research)—discover, retrieve, and analyze open and classified source data and apply expertise in evaluating and acquiring sources of data. They develop regional and subject expertise in order to provide information tailored to mission requirements. They collaborate with other intelligence community agencies and outside institutions to enhance information access and resource sharing. They recommend and acquire source materials to enhance resource center collections and provide training to help customers optimize the use of open source in support of the GEOINT mission.

GEOINT Analyst (Persistent Operations)—specialize in the real-time execution of tasking, collection, processing, exploitation, and dissemination of persistent GEOINT resources and data. Real-time execution incorporates multi-INT collaborative inputs to address long-term and emerging customer requirements. Emphasis is placed on time-dominant assessment and reporting, sensor allocation, and responsive collection capabilities of persistent GEOINT sensors.

GEOINT Analyst (Photogrammetric Image Science)—apply advanced techniques to measure the precise dimensions or relative size of objects on imagery. This includes monoscopic, stereoscopic, overhead,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
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handheld, or video imagery. They develop mensuration strategies, determine requirements, evaluate tools, and create customized methodologies and products to address a variety of geospatial intelligence problems.

GEOINT Analyst (Photogrammetry)—perform image assessment, point selection, mensuration, triangulation, orthorectification, and processing in order to produce standard and nonstandard image products. They increase the relative and absolute positioning accuracy of imagery from a variety of sensors to support mono and stereo exploitation. These analysts assess, evaluate, and extract elevation data from stereo imagery. They support both internal and external customers, review products produced by contractors and co-producers, and ensure that final products can be generated to meet customer’s stringent accuracy requirements.

GEOINT Analyst (Political Geography)—apply expertise in foreign languages and Romanization policies to research and analyze sources containing foreign geographic names information, make policy recommendations for the standardization of foreign geographic names, and populate and maintain the Geographic Names Database. They monitor their area of interest for administrative, political, and infrastructure changes to maintain professional currency. They advise the U.S. Board of Geographic Names and serve as staff members of the Secretariat for the U.S. Board of Geographic Names Foreign Names Committee.

GEOINT Analyst (Radar Image Science)—apply advanced techniques to determine the intelligence and geospatial information contained in radar data. They develop algorithms, evaluate tools, and create customized radar methodologies and products to address a variety of geospatial intelligence problems.

GEOINT Analyst (Regional Geography)—apply knowledge and expertise in physical, sociocultural, and political aspects of countries, regions, and urban areas to support national security goals, concerns, and strategies. They gather and evaluate regional source data to build geospatial data layers that serve as a foundation for analytic work. Analyzing these data, they characterize events, discover relationships and trends, infer conclusions, predict behaviors, and communicate these results as multisource geospatial intelligence in support of the intelligence community and the National System for Geospatial Intelligence.

GEOINT Analyst(Regional Source)—gather, assess, and evaluate source materials and ensure its quality and suitability to build foundational data. They conduct feasibility studies for the production of standard and specialty products. They maintain data integrity for various databases.

GEOINT Analyst (Requirements and lntegration—support the requirements, processes, and integration of future systems and methodologies. They coordinate with mission partners and customers to define requirements, evaluate, integrate, and transition to operations new technologies and associated functions.

GEOINT Analyst (Scientific Linguistics)—apply the principles of linguistics to problems encountered in the analysis and standardization of transliterated foreign geographic names. They collaborate with language experts at the national and international level to develop and implement consistent standardization policies. These analysts actively research country- and language-specific place-name issues and develop standardization policy recommendations for review and acceptance by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names Foreign Names Committee. They ensure the linguistic integrity of place-name intelligence developed by NGA on behalf of the U.S. Board on Geographic Names and the intelligence community.

GEOINT Analyst (Source Strategies)—collaborate with customers and source providers to develop comprehensive multi-INT, multisource strategies to address intelligence problems. They create tasking and dissemination requirements, adjudicate requirements, analyze and investigate collection performance, assess and report on end-to-end GEOINT system performance data, and advise customers in support of the National System for Geospatial Intelligence.

GEOINT Analyst (Spectral Image Science)—apply advanced techniques to determine the intelligence and geospatial information contained in the electro-optical region of the spectrum. This includes the exploitation

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
×

of multi- and hyperspectral imagery. They develop algorithms, evaluate tools, and create customized spectral methodologies and products to address a variety of geospatial intelligence problems.

GEOINT Analyst (Thermal Infrared Image Science)—apply advanced techniques to determine the intelligence and geospatial information contained in thermal infrared imagery. They conduct phenomenological studies on objects or events of interest to inform intelligence conclusions. They develop algorithms, evaluate tools, and create customized infrared methodologies and products to address a variety of geospatial intelligence problems.

GEOINT Analyst (Throughput Strategies)—collaborate with customers and source providers to ensure the delivery of GEOINT source data. They develop optimal source production and dissemination requirements, monitor and report on network health and status, implement relevant release policies, monitor site bandwidth utilization, recommend alternative delivery paths, maintain user site profiles/allocation, and support operations integration of new data sources and system capabilities.

Principal Scientist—domain experts in a core agency scientific discipline. They define and lead scientific research strategy in their domain for NGA and the intelligence community. They apply extensive Department of Defense and intelligence community experience to identify and promote ideas and opportunities to advance the agency’s ability to meet ever-expanding customer requirements for geospatial intelligence information. Principal Scientists act as a facilitator to bring diverse domains together to develop solutions based on an integration and fusion of technologies and sources. They support agency-level strategic planning. They provide oversight and coordination for agency science and technology programs.

Project Scientist—responsible for the day-to-day execution and technical oversight of a variety of scientific activities. They develop project schedules, determine resource requirements, provide technical guidance and oversight, and report results. Project Scientists apply in-depth expertise from a variety of scientific disciplines (e.g., photogrammetry, geodesy, GIS, computer science, mathematics, image science) to develop, analyze, evaluate, and apply new technology; develop expertise and tradecraft for the agency; and advise senior management on new and evolving technology. They participate in strategic planning, propose and defend program plans, and communicate and market results to customers and decision makers.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
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TABLE B.1 Education and Experience Requirements of Selected NGA Scientist and Analyst Positions

Education Education and Experience Experience
GEOINT Analyst (Aeronautical Intelligence)
Bachelor’s degree in aeronautical science, commercial aviation, flight, flight education, flight science, professional flight, professional flight technology, air traffic control, air traffic management, or another related degree that includes actual or simulated experience mandated with the curriculum along with a thorough knowledge of domestic and international air navigation principles as well as airspace and airfield infrastructure and operations A minimum of 30 semester (45 quarter) hours of completed coursework in aeronautics, aerospace engineering, aerospace studies, geospatial information systems, global security and intelligence, cartography, homeland security, or other areas related to aeronautical navigation and operations. PLUS Minimum of 250 hours of flight experience as a pilot, co-pilot, navigator, or flight instructor OR Minimum of 3 years of civilian or military work experience as an air traffic controller, flight dispatcher, flight or ground school instructor, mission planner, aeronautical information specialist, terminal enroute procedural specialist, or other field which provided an understanding of air navigation principles, operations, publications, and airspace and airfield infrastructure and operating procedures A minimum of 6 years of work experience within a NGA analytical occupation that involved the acquisition, collection, analysis and evaluation, extraction and population, and maintenance of NGA geospatial or safety of navigation related databases
GEOINT Analyst (Analytic Methodologist)
Bachelor’s degree in applied mathematics, geographic information science, geography, physical science, operations research, statistics, or a related discipline Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements and an additional 6 semester (9 quarter) hours of college-level nonbusiness mathematics or statistics (e.g., college algebra, trigonometry, calculus, inferential statistics) plus experience working as an intelligence analyst or in a closely related field that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the tasks associated with this work
GEOINT Analyst (Bathymetry)
Bachelor’s degree in geography, geology, hydrography, hydrology, marine sciences, oceanography, physical science, remote sensing, or a related discipline, or a bachelor’s degree with 30 semester hours of coursework in the above disciplines. Designation as an American Congress on Surveying and Mapping-The Hydrographic Society of America Certified Hydrographer is highly desired Four years, including a minimum of 30 semester (45 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements, plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work Six years of experience in the disciplines of hydrography or bathymetry that includes marine surveying, the use of current GIS tools, methods of research and analysis, application of hydrographic or bathymetric principles, or work related to the disciplines listed in the education requirements
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
×
Education Education and Experience Experience
GEOINT Analyst (Cartography)
Bachelor’s degree in cartography or a major that included, or was supplemented by, at least 30 semester (45 quarter) hours of coursework in cartography and/or directly related sciences and mathematics. Coursework may include, but is not limited to, astronomy, cartography, forestry, geodesy, geology, geophysics, GIS, land surveying, photogrammetry, physical and geological oceanography, geography, and remote sensing. Computer software classes associated with current technology, GIS courses, and information management classes may also be counted. The 30 semester (45 quarter) hours must include at least 6 semester (9 quarter) hours of college-level nonbusiness mathematics or statistics, but these should not account for more than 15 semester (22 quarter) hours Four years, including a minimum of 30 semester (45 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work Six years of significant applied experience in the cartographic field that includes the use of current GIS tools
GEOINT Analyst (Foundation Strategies)
Bachelor’s degree in geodesy, mathematics, physical science, or a related discipline that includes at least 30 semester (45 quarter) hours of coursework in any combination of astronomy, cartography, computer science, engineering science, geodesy, geology, geomatics, geophysics, mathematics, meteorology, orbital mechanics, photogrammetry, physical science, physics, remote sensing, or surveying. Coursework must include differential equations and integral calculus Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work Six years of experience in conducting work related to civil engineering, geodesy, geophysics, geotechnical analysis, geodetic surveying, or related experience
GEOINT Analyst (Geodetic Earth Sciences)
Bachelor’s degree in geodesy, mathematics, physical science, or a related discipline that includes at least 30 semester (45 quarter) hours of coursework in any combination of astronomy, cartography, computer science, engineering science, geodesy, geology, geomatics, geophysics, mathematics, meteorology, orbital mechanics, photogrammetry, physical science, physics, remote sensing, or surveying. Coursework must include differential equations and integral calculus Four years, including a minimum of 30 semester (45 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work Six years of experience in conducting work related to satellite operations, G PS surveying, geodesy, geophysics, or Wide Area Network analysis
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
×
Education Education and Experience Experience
GEOINT Analyst (Geodetic Survey)
Bachelor’s degree in geodesy, mathematics, physical science, or a related discipline that includes at least 30 semester (45 quarter) hours of coursework in any combination of astronomy, cartography, computer science, engineering science, geodesy, geology, geomatics, geophysics, GIS, mathematics, meteorology, orbital mechanics, photogrammetry, physical science, physics, remote sensing, or surveying. Coursework must include differential equations and integral calculus Four years, including a minimum of 30 semester (45 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work Six years of experience in conducting work related to civil engineering, geodesy, geophysics, geotechnical analysis, surveying, or related experience. Classification as a Professional Engineer or Land Surveyor is highly desirable
GEOINT Analyst (Geospatial Analysis)
Bachelor’s degree in a cartography, geography, GIS, physical science, applied mathematics, statistics, or a related discipline, or a bachelor’s degree in any discipline with a certificate in GIS from an accredited university Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of coursework in GIS, spatial analysis, or any area listed in the education requirements plus additional experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work. A certificate in GIS from an accredited university or an emphasis in GIS is highly desired Six years of significant applied experience in a geospatial analysis field that includes the use of current GIS tools, methods of research and analysis, application of cartographic principles, and work related to the fields listed in the education requirements
GEOINT Analyst (Geospatial Data Stewardship)
Bachelor’s degree in cartography, computer science, geology, geography, geomatics, GIS, physical science, urban and regional planning, or a related discipline. The 30 semester (45 quarter) hours must include at least 6 semester (9 quarter) hours of college-level nonbusiness mathematics or statistics, but these should not account for more than 15 semester (22 quarter) hours Four years, including a minimum of 30 semester (45 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work Six years of significant applied experience in a field that includes geospatial analysis, feature extraction, and data evaluation and manipulation
GEOINT Analyst (Imagery Intelligence)
Bachelor’s degree in engineering, foreign area studies, geography, history, imagery science, international affairs, military science, physical science, political science, remote sensing, or a related discipline Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of college coursework in any area listed in the education requirements plus experience working as an imagery analyst, OR in a closely related field that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the tasks associated with this work Six years of significant applied experience in imagery analysis or all-source intelligence experience, or six years in combat arms or in combat support for military personnel
GEOINT Analyst (Imagery Science)
Bachelor’s degree in engineering, imagery science, mathematics, physical science, or a related discipline Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements, plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work
GEOINT Analyst (Infrared Source Analysis)
Bachelor’s degree in mathematics, engineering, geography, physical science, remote sensing, or a related discipline Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of college coursework in any area listed in the education requirements, plus experience working in a geospatial intelligence discipline or in a closely related field that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the tasks associated with this work A minimum of 4 years of relevant military experience or experience working in a geospatial intelligence discipline
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
×
Education Education and Experience Experience
GEOINT Analyst (Lidar Image Science)
Bachelor’s degree in engineering, imagery science, mathematics, physical science, or a related discipline Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements, plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work
GEOINT Analyst (Maritime)
Bachelor’s degree from a federal or state maritime academy, the U.S. Naval Academy, or the U.S. Coast Guard Academy. Education must include successful completion of the requirements for a U.S. Coast Guard Third Mate’s License or Officer of the Deck Underway Qualification by the U.S. Navy or U.S. Coast Guard. Strongly desired candidates will also include classes in GIS software Three years of general experience that demonstrates knowledge in the field of marine navigation. Examples of qualifying experience include navigation and sea experience on U.S. oceangoing vessels, experience as an instructor on marine navigational subjects, or other related experience. Experience must include successful completion of the requirements for a U.S. Coast Guard Third Mate’s License or Officer of the Deck Underway Qualification by the U.S. Navy or U.S. Coast Guard. Strongly desired candidates will also include classes in GIS software
GEOINT Analyst (Open Source Research)
A Master of Science in library science, library and information science, information science and learning technologies, or a similar program from an accredited university OR a bachelor’s degree in cartography, cultural area studies, earth sciences, engineering, environmental science, foreign language, geodesy, geography, GIS, history, hydrography, hydrology, imagery science, international affairs/studies, oceanography, photogrammetry, physical science, remote sensing, or a related discipline Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the bachelor’s education requirements plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work Six years of significant applied experience in information retrieval that includes methods of research and analysis, the use of current GIS tools, or work related to the fields listed in the bachelor’s education requirements
GEOINT Analyst (Persistent Operations)
Bachelor’s degree in science, technology, business administration, or a related field Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of college coursework in any area listed in the education requirements plus experience working in a GEOINT related field that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the tasks associated with this work Six years of experience in a GEOINT- related field
GEOINT Analyst (Photogrammetric Image Science)
Bachelor’s degree in engineering, imagery science, mathematics, physical science, or a related discipline Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements, plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
×
Education Education and Experience Experience
GEOINT Analyst (Photogrammetry)
Bachelor’s degree in cartography or a major that included, or was supplemented by, at least 30 semester (45 quarter) hours of coursework in cartography and/or directly related sciences and mathematics. Coursework may include, but is not limited to, cartography, computer science, geodesy, geology, geophysics, land surveying, photogrammetry, geography, remote sensing, or a related discipline. The 30 semester (45 quarter) hours must include at least 6 semester (9 quarter) hours of college-level nonbusiness mathematics or statistics, but these should not account for more than 15 semester (22 quarter) hours Four years, including a minimum of 30 semester (45 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work Six years of significant applied experience in the cartographic field that includes the application of mensuration techniques
GEOINT Analyst (Political Geography)
Bachelor’s degree in anthropology, cartography, cultural area studies, foreign language, geography, GIS, history, international affairs/studies, linguistics, or a related discipline Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements, plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work Six years of significant applied experience in geography that includes the application of foreign language or linguistics, methods of research and analysis, application of cartographic principles, and work related to the fields listed in the education requirements
GEOINT Analyst (Radar Image Science)
Bachelor’s degree in engineering, imagery science, mathematics, physical science, or a related discipline Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements, plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work
GEOINT Analyst (Regional Geography)
Bachelor’s degree in anthropology, cartography, cultural area studies, earth sciences, foreign language, geography, GIS, history, international affairs/studies, sociology, or a related discipline Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements, plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work Six years of significant applied experience in geography or related fields that includes the use of current GIS tools, methods of research and analysis, application of cartographic principles, and work related to the fields listed in the education requirements
GEOINT Analyst (Regional Source)
Bachelor’s degree in cartography, geography, GIS, information science, library science, or a related discipline Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements, plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work Six years of significant applied experience in the use of current GIS tools, methods of research and analysis, application of cartographic principles, and work related to the fields listed in the education requirements
GEOINT Analyst (Requirements & Integration)
None Six years of education and experience. Education and experience in remote sensing, geography, intelligence, or equivalent areas. Experience in acquisition and/or program management is highly desirable Six years of significant applied experience in remote sensing, geography, intelligence, or equivalent areas
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
×
Education Education and Experience Experience
GEOINT Analyst (Scientific Linguistics)
Bachelor’s degree in linguistics or an NGA-specified foreign language with a minimum of 6 semester (9 quarter) hours of coursework in linguistics. Master’s degree in theoretical linguistics is highly desirable. The candidate must also receive a reading proficiency level 2 on the Defense Language Proficiency Test in a foreign language specified by NGA Four years in a NGA-specified foreign language that includes a minimum of 6 semester (9 quarter) hours of coursework in linguistics and demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work. The candidate must also receive a reading proficiency level 2 on the Defense Language Proficiency Test in a foreign language specified by NGA
GEOINT Analyst (Source Strategies)
Bachelor’s degree in cartography, cultural area studies, earth sciences, environmental science, geodesy, geography, geology, GIS, history, hydrography, hydrology, imagery science, international affairs/studies, liberal studies, oceanography, photogrammetry, physical science, political science, remote sensing, or a related discipline Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work Six years of significant applied experience in the intelligence field, imagery analysis, the use of current GIS tools, or work related to the fields listed in the education requirements
GEOINT Analyst (Spectral Image Science)
Bachelor’s degree in engineering, imagery science, mathematics, physical science, or a related discipline Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements, plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work
GEOINT Analyst (Thermal Infrared Image Science)
Bachelor’s degree in engineering, imagery science, mathematics, physical science, or a related discipline Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements, plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work
GEOINT Analyst (Throughput Strategies)
Bachelor’s degree in cartography, communications, cultural area studies, earth sciences, engineering, environmental science, geography, geology, GIS, history, imagery science, international affairs/ studies, liberal studies, photogrammetry, physical science, remote sensing, or a related discipline Five years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work Six years of significant applied experience in the application of communication strategies, architecture, systems integration, throughput management, requirements analysis, or work related to the fields listed in the education requirements
Principal Scientist
Bachelor’s degree in engineering, mathematics, physical science, or a related discipline that includes at least 24 semester (36 quarter) hours in physical science and/or related engineering science. Such coursework includes, but is not limited to, astronomy, cartography, chemistry, computer science, dynamics, electrical engineering, geodesy, geology, geophysics, GIS, mathematics, orbital mechanics, photogrammetry, physics, remote sensing, or surveying. An advanced degree (e.g., M.S., Ph.D.) in engineering, mathematics, physical science, or a related discipline is preferred Four years, including minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of coursework in any area listed in the education requirements plus additional experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
×
Education Education and Experience Experience
Project Scientist
Bachelor’s degree in engineering, mathematics, physical science, or a related discipline that includes 24 semester (36 quarter) hours in physical science and/or a related engineering science. Such coursework includes, but is not limited to, astronomy, cartography, chemistry, computer science, dynamics, electrical engineering, geodesy, geology, geophysics, GIS, mathematics, orbital mechanics, photogrammetry, physics, remote sensing, or surveying. Although not mandatory, coursework in differential and integral calculus is preferred Four years, including a minimum of 24 semester (36 quarter) hours of college education in any areas listed in the education requirements plus experience that demonstrates the ability to successfully perform the duties associated with this work  

NOTE: As a rule, every 30 semester (45 quarter) hours of college work is equivalent to one year of experience.

SOURCE: NGA.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Job Descriptions of NGA Scientists and Analysts." National Research Council. 2013. Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18265.
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We live in a changing world with multiple and evolving threats to national security, including terrorism, asymmetrical warfare (conflicts between agents with different military powers or tactics), and social unrest. Visually depicting and assessing these threats using imagery and other geographically-referenced information is the mission of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA). As the nature of the threat evolves, so do the tools, knowledge, and skills needed to respond. The challenge for NGA is to maintain a workforce that can deal with evolving threats to national security, ongoing scientific and technological advances, and changing skills and expectations of workers.

Future U.S. Workforce for Geospatial Intelligence assesses the supply of expertise in 10 geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) fields, including 5 traditional areas (geodesy and geophysics, photogrammetry, remote sensing, cartographic science, and geographic information systems and geospatial analysis) and 5 emerging areas that could improve geospatial intelligence (GEOINT fusion, crowdsourcing, human geography, visual analytics, and forecasting). The report also identifies gaps in expertise relative to NGA's needs and suggests ways to ensure an adequate supply of geospatial intelligence expertise over the next 20 years.

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