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Microlivestock: Little-Known Small Animals with a Promising Economic Future (1991)

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Suggested Citation:"Board on Science and Technology for International Development." National Research Council. 1991. Microlivestock: Little-Known Small Animals with a Promising Economic Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1831.
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Page441
Suggested Citation:"Board on Science and Technology for International Development." National Research Council. 1991. Microlivestock: Little-Known Small Animals with a Promising Economic Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1831.
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Page442
Suggested Citation:"Board on Science and Technology for International Development." National Research Council. 1991. Microlivestock: Little-Known Small Animals with a Promising Economic Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1831.
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Page443
Suggested Citation:"Board on Science and Technology for International Development." National Research Council. 1991. Microlivestock: Little-Known Small Animals with a Promising Economic Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1831.
×
Page444
Suggested Citation:"Board on Science and Technology for International Development." National Research Council. 1991. Microlivestock: Little-Known Small Animals with a Promising Economic Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1831.
×
Page445
Suggested Citation:"Board on Science and Technology for International Development." National Research Council. 1991. Microlivestock: Little-Known Small Animals with a Promising Economic Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1831.
×
Page446
Suggested Citation:"Board on Science and Technology for International Development." National Research Council. 1991. Microlivestock: Little-Known Small Animals with a Promising Economic Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1831.
×
Page447
Suggested Citation:"Board on Science and Technology for International Development." National Research Council. 1991. Microlivestock: Little-Known Small Animals with a Promising Economic Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1831.
×
Page448
Suggested Citation:"Board on Science and Technology for International Development." National Research Council. 1991. Microlivestock: Little-Known Small Animals with a Promising Economic Future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1831.
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Page449

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441 Board on Science and Technology for International Development Publications and Information Services (HA-476E) Office of International Affairs National Research Council 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20418 USA How to Order BOSTID Reports BOSTID manages programs with developing countries on behalf of the U.S. National Research Council. Reports published by BOSTID are sponsored in most instances by the U.S. Agency for International Development. They are intended for distribution to readers in devel- oping countries who are affiliated with governmental, educational, or research institutions, and who have professional interest in the subject areas treated by the reports. BOSTID books are available from selected international distributors. For more efficient and expedient service, please place your order with your local distributor. (See list on back page.J Requestors from areas not yet represented by a distributor should send their orders directly to BOSTID at the above address. Energy 33. Alcohol Fuels: Options for Developing Countries. 1983, 128pp. Examines the potential for the production and utilization of alcohol fuels in developing countries. Includes information on various tropical crops and their conversion to alcohols through both traditional and novel processes. ISBN 0-309-04160-0. 36. Producer Gas: Another Fuel for Motor Transport. 1983, 112pp. During World War II Europe and Asia used wood, charcoal, and coal to fuel over a million gasoline and diesel vehicles. However the technology has since been virtually forgotten. This report reviews producer gas and its modern potential. ISBN 0-309-04161-9.

442 56. The Diffusion of Biomass Energy Technologies in Developing Coun- tries. 1984, 120pp. Examines economic, cultural, and political factors that affect the introduction of biomass-based energy technologies in developing countries. It includes information on the opportunities for these technologies as well as conclusions and recommendations for their application. ISBN 0-309-04253-4. Technology Options 14. More Water for Arid Lands: Promising Technologies and Research Opportunities. 1974, 153pp. Outlines little-known but promising tech- nologies to supply and conserve water in arid areas. ISBN 0-309-04151-1. 21. Making Aquatic Weeds Useful: Some Perspectives for Developing Countries. 1976, 175pp. Describes ways to exploit aquatic weeds for grazing, and by harvesting and processing for use as compost, animal feed, pulp, paper, and fuel. Also describes utilization for sewage and industrial wastewater. ISBN 0-309-04153-X. 34. Priorities in Biotechnology Research for International Development: Proceedings of a Workshop. 1982, 261pp. Report of a workshop organized to examine opportunities for biotechnology research in six areas: 1) vaccines, 2) animal production, 3) monoclonal antibodies, 4) energy, 5) biological nitrogen fixation, and 6) plant sell and tissue culture. ISBN 0-309-04256-9. 61. Fisheries Technologies for Developing Countries. 1987, 167pp. Identifies newer technologies in boat building, fishing gear and methods, coastal mariculture, artificial reefs and fish aggregating devices, and processing and preservation of the catch. The emphasis is on practices suitable for artisanal fisheries. ISBN 0-309-04260-7. Plants 25. Tropical Legumes: Resources for the Future. 1979, 331pp. Describes plants of the family Leguminosae, including root crops, pulses, fruits, forages, timber and wood products, ornamentals, and others. ISBN 0-309-04154-6.

443 47. Amaranth: Modern Prospects for an Ancient Crop. 1983, 81pp. Before the time of Cortez, grain amaranths were staple foods of the Aztec and Inca. Today this nutritious food has a bright future. The report discusses vegetable amaranths also. ISBN 0-309-04171-6. 53. ,Iojoba: New Crop for Arid Lands. 1985, 102pp. In the last 10 years, the domestication of jojoba, a little-known North American desert shrub, has been all but completed. This report describes the plant and its promise to provide a unique vegetable oil and many likely industrial uses. ISBN 0-309-04251-8. 63. Quality-Protein Maize. 1988, 130pp. Identifies the promise of a nutritious new form of the planet's third largest food crop. Includes chapters on the importance of maize, malnutrition and protein quality, experiences with quality-protein maize (QPM), QPM's potential uses in feed and food, nutritional qualities, genetics, research needs, and limitations. ISBN 0-309-04262-3. 64. Triticale: A Promising Addition to the World's Cereal Grains. 1988, 105pp. Outlines the recent transformation of triticale, a hybrid between wheat and rye, into a food crop with much potential for many marginal lands. Includes chapters on triticale's history, nutritional quality, breeding, agronomy, food and feed uses, research needs, and limita- tions. ISBN 0-309-04263-1. 67. Lost Crops of the Incas. 1989. 415pp. The Andes is one of the seven major centers of plant domestication but the world is largely unfamiliar with its native food crops. When the conquistadores brought the potato to Europe, they ignored the other domesticated Andean crops fruits, legumes, tubers, and grains that had been cultivated for centuries by the Incas. This book focuses on 30 of the `'forgotten'' Incan crops that show promise not only for the Andes but for warm- temperate, subtropical, and upland tropical regions in many parts of the world. ISBN 0-309-04264-X. 70. Saline Agriculture: Salt-Tolerant Plants for Developing Countries. 1989, approx 150pp. The purpose of this report is to create greater awareness of salt-tolerant plants and the special needs they may fill in developing countries. Examples of the production of food, fodder, fuel, and other products are included. Salt-tolerant plants can use land and water unsuitable for conventional crops and can harness saline resources that are generally neglected or considered as impediments to rather than opportunities for development. ISBN 0-309-04266-6.

444 Innovations in Tropical Forestay 35. Sowing Forests from the Air. 1981, 64pp. Describes experiences with establishing forests by sowing tree seed from aircraft. Suggests testing and development of the techniques for possible use where forest destruction now outpaces reforestation. ISBN 0-309-04257-7. 40. Firewood Crops: Shrub and Tree Species for Energy Production. Volume II, 1983, 92pp. Examines the selection of species of woody plants that seem suitable candidates for fuelwood plantations in developing countries. ISBN 0-309-04164-3. 41. Mangium and Other Fast-Growing Acacias for the Humid Tropics. 1983, 63pp. Highlights 10 acacia species that are native to the tropical rain forest of Australasia. That they could become valuable forestry resources elsewhere is suggested by the exceptional performance of Acacia mangium in Malaysia. ISBN 0-309-04165-1. 42. Calliandra: A Versatile Small Tree for the Humid Tropics. 1983, 56pp. This Latin American shrub is being widely planted by the villagers and government agencies in Indonesia to provide firewood, prevent erosion, provide honey, and feed livestock. ISBN 0-309-04166-X. 43. Casuarinas: Nitrogen-Fixing Trees for Adverse Sites. 1983, 118pp. These robust, nitrogen-fixing, Australasian trees could become valuable resources for planting on harsh eroding land to provide fuel and other products. Eighteen species for tropical lowlands and highlands, tem- perate zones, and semiarid regions are highlighted. ISBN 0-309-04167-8. 52. Leucaena: Promising Forage and Tree Crop for the Tropics. 1984, 2nd edition, lOOpp. Describes a multi-purpose tree crop of potential value for much of the humid lowland tropics. Leucaena is one of the fastest growing and most useful trees for the tropics. ISBN 0-309-04250-X. Managing Tropical Animal Resources 32. The Water Buffalo: New Prospects for an Underutilized Animal. 1981, 188pp. The water buffalo is performing notably well in recent trials in such unexpected places as the United States, Australia, and

445 Brazil. Report discusses the animals's promise, particularly emphasiz- ing its potential for use outside Asia. ISBN 0-309-04159-7. 44. Butterfly Farming in Papua New Guinea. 1983, 36pp. Indigenous butterflies are being reared in Papua New Guinea villages in a formal government program that both provides a cash income in remote rural areas and contributes to the conservation of wildlife and tropical forests. ISBN 0-309-04168-6 45. Crocodiles as a Resource for the Tropics. 1983, 60pp. In most parts of the tropics, crocodilian populations are being decimated but pro- grams in Papua New Guinea and a few other countries demonstrate that, with care, the animals can be raised for profit while protecting the wild populations. ISBN 0-309-04169-4. 46. Little-Known Asian Animals with a Promising Economic Future. 1983, 133pp. Describes banteng, madura, mithan, yak, kouprey, ba- birusa, javan warty pig, and other obscure but possibly globally useful wild and domesticated animals that are indigenous to Asia. ISBN 0-309-04170-8. 68. Microlivestock: Little-Known Small Animals with a Promising Economic Future. 1990, 460pp. Discusses the promise of small breeds and species of livestock for Third World villages. Identifies more than 40 species, including miniature breeds of cattle, sheep, goats, and pigs; eight types of poultry; rabbits; guinea pigs and other rodents; dwarf deer and antelope; iguanas; and bees. ISBN 0-309-04265-8. Health 49. Opportunities for the Control of Dracunculiasis. 1983, 65pp. Dra- cunculiasis is a parasitic disease that temporarily disables many people in remote, rural areas in Africa, India, and the Middle East. Contains the findings and recommendations of distinguished scientists who were brought together to discuss dracunculiasis as an international health problem. ISBN 0-309-04172-4. 55. Manpower Needs and Career Opportunities in the Field Aspects of Vector Biology. 1983, 53pp. Recommends ways to develop and train the manpower necessary to ensure that experts will be available in the future to understand the complex ecological relationships of vectors with human hosts and pathogens that cause such diseases as malaria, dengue fever, filariasis, and schistosomiasis. ISBN 0-309-04252-6.

446 60. U.S. Capacity to Address Tropical Infectious Diseases. 1987, 225pp. Addresses U.S. manpower and institutional capabilities in both the public and private sectors to address tropical infectious disease prob- lems. ISBN 0-309-04259-3. Resource Management 50. Environmental Change in the West African Sahel. 1984, 96pp. Identifies measures to help restore critical ecological processes and thereby increase sustainable production in dryland farming, irrigated agriculture, forestry and fuelwood, and animal husbandry. Provides baseline information for the formulation of environmentally sound projects. ISBN 0-309-04173-2. 51. Agroforestry in the West African Sahel. 1984, 86pp. Provides development planners with information regarding traditional agrofo- restry systems-their relevance to the modern Sahel, their design, social and institutional considerations, problems encountered in the practice of agroforestry, and criteria for the selection of appropriate plant species to be used. ISBN 0-309-04174-0. 69. The Improvement of Tropical and Subtropical Rangelands. 1989. This report characterizes tropical and subtropical rangelands, describes social adaptation to these rangelands, discusses the impact of socio- economic and political change upon the management of range re- sources, and explores culturally and ecologically sound approaches to rangeland rehabilitation. Selected case studies are included. ISBN 0-309-04261-5. General 65. Science and Technology for Development: Prospects Entering the Twenty-First Century. 1988. 79 pp. This report commemorates the twenty-fifth anniversary of the U.S. Agency for International Devel- opment. The symposium on which this report is based provided an excellent opportunity to describe and assess the contribution of science and technology to the development of Third World countries and to focus attention on what science and technology are likely to accomplish in the decade to come.

447 Forthcoming Books from BOSTID Applications of Biotechnology to Tradtional Fermented Foods (1991) Neem (1991) Vetiver: The Hedge Against Erosion (1991) Forestry Research in the Tropics (1991)

448 BOSTID Publication Distributors United States: Agribookstore 1611 N. Kent Street Arlington, VA 22209 agAccess PO Box 2008 Davis, CA 95617 Europe: I.T. Publications 103-105 Southhampton Row London WC 1 B 4HH United Kingdom S. Toeche-Mittler TRIOPS Department Hindenburgstr. 33 6100 Darmstadt Germany T. O. O.L. Publications Sarphatistraat 650 1018 AV Amsterdam Netherlands Asia: Asian Institute of Technology Library & Regional Documentation Center PO Box 2754 Bangkok 10501 Thailand National Bookstore Sales Manager PO Box 1934 Manila Philippines University of Malaya Coop Bookshop Ltd. Universiti of Malaya Main Library Building 59200 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia Researchco Periodicals 1865 Street No. 139 Tri Nagar Delhi 110 035 India China Natl Publications Import & Export Corp. PO Box 88F Beijing China South America: Enlace Ltda. Carrera 6a. No. 51-21 Apartado Aero 34270 Bogota, D.E. Colombia Africa: TAECON c/o Agricultural Engineering Dept. P.O. Box 170UST Kumasi Ghana Australasia: Tree Crops Centre P.O. Box 27 Subiaco, WA 6008 Australia

449 For More Information To receive more information about BOSTID reports and programs, please fill in the attached coupon and mail it to: Board on Science and Technology for International Development Publications and Information Services (HA-476E) Office of International Affairs National Research Council 2101 Constitution Avenue, N.W. Washington, D.C. 20418 USA Your comments about the value of these reports are also welcome. Name Title Institution Street Address City Country Postal Code Name Title Institution Street Address 68 City Country Postal Code 68

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Microlivestock is a term coined for species that are inherently small as well as for breeds of cattle, sheep, goats, and pigs that are less than about half the size of the most common breeds. These miniature animals are seldom considered in the broad picture of livestock development, but they seem to have a promising future, especially in developing nations or wherever land is scarce.

This book raises awareness of the potential of these small species, including microcattle, microsheep, various poultry, rabbits, rodents, deer, antelope, and lizards. It also strives to stimulate their introduction into animal research and economic development programs.

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