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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Microbial Ecology in States of Health and Disease: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18433.
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Appendix B

Agenda

Microbial Ecology in States of Health and Disease

March 18–19, 2013
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington DC

DAY ONE: MONDAY, MARCH 18, 2013

7:30–8:00: Registration and Continental Breakfast
8:00–8:15: Welcoming Remarks: David Relman, James Hughes, and Lonnie King
8:15–9:00: KEYNOTE: Indigenous microbes and the ecology of chronic diseases

Martin Blaser, New York University

9:00–9:15: Discussion
9:15–9:30: BREAK
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Microbial Ecology in States of Health and Disease: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18433.
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SESSION I: HOST–MICROBE INTERACTIONS IN HUMANS, ANIMALS, AND PLANTS
Moderator: Rima Khabbaz, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
9:30–10:00: Plant–microbe interactions in root endophyte and rhizosphere communities of Populus

Gerald Tuskan, Oak Ridge National Laboratory

10:00–10:30: Origins and maintenance of host–microbe interactions

Angela Douglas, Cornell University

10:30–11:00: Annual cycles of extreme dietary change shape gut microbiota and their hibernator hosts

Hannah Carey, University of Wisconsin, Madison

11:00–11:30: Symbiont microbiota and the development and maturation of the mammalian immune system

Gérard Eberl, Pasteur Institute

11:30–12:00: Discussion
12:00–1:00: LUNCH
SESSION II: EMERGING INSIGHTS INTO HOST–MICROBE INTERACTIONS
Moderator: David Relman, Stanford University
1:00–1:30: Community ecology and the human vaginal microbiome

Larry Forney, University of Idaho

1:30–2:00: Host defense and immunomodulation of mucosal candidiasis

Paul Fidel, Jr., Louisiana State University

2:00–2:30: Interactions between the mammalian virome, disease susceptibility genes, and the phenome

Herbert “Skip” Virgin, Washington University

2:30–3:00: BREAK
3:00–3:30: Microbial community dynamics and disruption—Health and disease in coral reefs and the human lung

Forest Rohwer, San Diego State University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Microbial Ecology in States of Health and Disease: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18433.
×
3:30–4:00: Interactions and functions of the gut microbiota in a model vertebrate host

Karen Guillemin, University of Oregon

4:00–4:30: The influence of the mucosal immune system and gut microbiota on inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs)

Richard Blumberg, Harvard Medical School

4:30–5:30: Discussion
5:30–6:00: Concluding Remarks
6:00: ADJOURN DAY ONE

DAY TWO: TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 2013

8:00–8:30: Registration and Continental Breakfast
8:30–8:45: Welcoming Remarks and Summary of Day One: David Relman
SESSION III: STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF HOSTASSOCIATED MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES
Moderator: Queta Bond, Burroughs Wellcome Fund
8:45–9:15: The application of ecological concepts to host-associated microbial communities

Brendan Bohannan, University of Oregon

9:15–9:45: Nutrition and the infant gut microbiota—Health and disease in the first 1,000 days

David Mills, University of California, Davis

9:45–10:15: Roles of the microbiota in the control and pathogenesis of infections

Yasmine Belkaid, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

10:15–10:45: BREAK
10:45–11:15: Host–microbe interactions and the genetic architecture of IBD and other complex diseases

Ramnik Xavier, Massachusetts General Hospital

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Microbial Ecology in States of Health and Disease: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18433.
×
11:15–11:45: Host–mycobiome interactions in gut homeostasis and pathogenesis

David Underhill, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

11:45–12:15: Discussion
12:15–1:15: LUNCH
SESSION IV: RESEARCH CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES
Moderator: Jesse Goodman, Food and Drug Administration
1:15–1:45: Metabolism, interspecies interactions, and novel approaches to disease diagnostics and treatment

Michael Fischbach, University of California, San Francisco

1:45–2:15: Fecal transplantation as a treatment option for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

Josbert J. Keller, University of Amsterdam

2:15–2:45: BREAK
2:45–3:15: Innate antimicrobial mechanisms in disease prevention and treatment

Michael Zasloff, Georgetown University

3:15–3:45: The skin microbiome and chronic disease states

Julie Segre, National Human Genome Research Institute

3:45–4:30: Discussion
4:30–4:45: Concluding Remarks
4:45: ADJOURN
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Microbial Ecology in States of Health and Disease: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18433.
×
Page497
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Microbial Ecology in States of Health and Disease: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18433.
×
Page498
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Microbial Ecology in States of Health and Disease: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18433.
×
Page499
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2014. Microbial Ecology in States of Health and Disease: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18433.
×
Page500
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Individually and collectively, resident microbes play important roles in host health and survival. Shaping and shaped by their host environments, these microorganisms form intricate communities that are in a state of dynamic equilibrium. This ecologic and dynamic view of host-microbe interactions is rapidly redefining our view of health and disease. It is now accepted that the vast majority of microbes are, for the most part, not intrinsically harmful, but rather become established as persistent, co-adapted colonists in equilibrium with their environment, providing useful goods and services to their hosts while deriving benefits from these host associations. Disruption of such alliances may have consequences for host health, and investigations in a wide variety of organisms have begun to illuminate the complex and dynamic network of interaction - across the spectrum of hosts, microbes, and environmental niches - that influence the formation, function, and stability of host-associated microbial communities.

Microbial Ecology in States of Health and Disease is the summary of a workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine's Forum on Microbial Threats in March 2013 to explore the scientific and therapeutic implications of microbial ecology in states of health and disease. Participants explored host-microbe interactions in humans, animals, and plants; emerging insights into how microbes may influence the development and maintenance of states of health and disease; the effects of environmental change(s) on the formation, function, and stability of microbial communities; and research challenges and opportunities for this emerging field of inquiry.

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