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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2014. The Science of Science Communication II: Summary of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18478.
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Appendix A

Agenda

MONDAY | SEPTEMBER 23, 2013

The Sciences of Communication

8:30-8:45   Welcome
Barbara Kline Pope, Executive Director for Communications, The National Academies

    Moderators: Baruch Fischhoff (Carnegie Mellon University) and Dietram Scheufele (University of Wisconsin–Madison)

8:45-10:00   Lay Narratives and Epistemologies
Doug Medin (Northwestern University)

    Discussion with Ann Bostrom (University of Washington) and Kevin Dunbar (University of Maryland)

10:00-10:30   Break

10:30-11:45   Motivated Audiences: Belief and Attitude Formation About Science Topics
Susan Fiske (Princeton University)
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2014. The Science of Science Communication II: Summary of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18478.
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    Discussion with Craig Fox (University of California, Los Angeles) and Bill Hallman (Rutgers University)

11:45-1:00   Lunch

1:00-2:15   Communicating Uncertainty
Baruch Fischhoff (Carnegie Mellon University)

    Discussion with David Budescu (Fordham University) and Adam Finkel (University of Pennsylvania)

2:15-3:30   Social Networks
Noshir Contractor (Northwestern University)

    Discussion with Deb Roy (Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Twitter) and Katherine Milkman (University of Pennsylvania)

3:30-4:00   Break

4:00-5:15   Science Communication as Political Communication
Dietram Scheufele (University of Wisconsin, Madison)

    Discussion with Kathleen Hall Jamieson (University of Pennsylvania) and Patrick Sturgis (Southampton University)

5:15-5:30   Wrap-Up/Lessons Learned
Baruch Fischhoff (Carnegie Mellon University)

TUESDAY | SEPTEMBER 24, 2013

Science in a Time of Controversy

8:30-8:45   Welcome
Ralph Cicerone, President, National Academy of Sciences

8:45-9:30   Keynote Address
Responding to the Attack on the Best Available Evidence
Kathleen Hall Jamieson (University of Pennsylvania)

9:30-10:00   Break
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2014. The Science of Science Communication II: Summary of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18478.
×
Moderator: Cara Santa Maria (Pivot TV)

10:00-11:30   Panel 1 • Individual and Social Perceptions of Science: Three Cases

    Geoengineering: Public Attitudes, Stakeholder Perspectives, and the Challenge of “Upstream” Engagement
Nick Pidgeon (Cardiff University)

    What Good Is a Guideline That People Can’t Remember?: The Benefits of Extreme Simplicity in Communicating Nutrition Science
Rebecca Ratner (University of Maryland)

    Enhanced Active Choice: A New Method to Change Behavior
Punam Keller (Dartmouth College)

    Discussants: Bill Hallman (Rutgers University) and Rick
Borchelt (U.S. Department of Energy)

11:30-12:15   Lessons from Business Davis Masten
(Quantified Self) and Peter Zandan (Hill+Knowlton Strategies)

12:15-1:30   Lunch

1:30-3:00   Panel 2 • Influences of Social Networks

    The Science of Social Media
Duncan Watts (Microsoft)

    Charting Science Chatter Through Social Media
Deb Roy (Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Twitter)

    What Makes Online Content Viral?
Katherine Milkman (University of Pennsylvania)

    Discussants: Noshir Contractor (Northwestern University) and Xeni Jardin (Boing Boing)
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2014. The Science of Science Communication II: Summary of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18478.
×
3:00-3:30   Break

3:30-5:00   Panel 3 • Narratives in Science Communication Science

    Narratives: Mass Media and Ethical Considerations
Michael Dahlstrom (Iowa State University)

    How Scientists Talk to One Another About Their Science—and What the Public Hears
Kevin Dunbar (University of Maryland)

    Tales Teens Tell: Interactive Media Communications Can Improve Adolescent Health
Julie Downs (Carnegie Mellon University)

    Discussants: Melanie Green (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill) and Marty Kaplan (University of Southern California)

5:00-5:30   Science Collaboration: Surging Seas
Gabrielle Wong-Parodi (Carnegie Mellon University) and Ben Strauss (Climate Central)

5:30-7:00   Reception, Great Hall

WEDNESDAY | SEPTEMBER 25, 2013

Creating Collaborations for Communication

8:30-9:00   Welcome and Orientation

Alan Leshner, CEO, American Association for the Advancement of Science


9:00-9:15   Break and move to workshop locations

9:15-12:15   Concurrent workshops

    Climate Change Workshop

   

Science Content Expert: Ralph Cicerone (National Academy of Sciences)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2014. The Science of Science Communication II: Summary of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18478.
×
   

Communication Researchers: Tony Leiserowitz (Yale University) and Nick Pidgeon (Cardiff University)

Communication Practitioner: Joe Witte (NBC, retired) Facilitator: Lynn Litow Flayhart


    Evolution Workshop

   

Science Content Expert: Eugenie Scott (National Center for Science Education)

Communication Researchers: Robert Pennock (Michigan State University) and Ed Maibach (George Mason University)

Communication Practitioner: Dan Vergano (National Geographic)

Facilitator: William Courville

    Obesity/Nutrition Workshop

   

Science Content Expert: David Allison (University of Alabama at Birmingham)

Communication Researchers: Julie Downs (Carnegie Mellon University) and Brian Wansink (Cornell University)

Communication Practitioner: Kathleen Zelman (WebMD)

Facilitator: Ellen Harvey

    Nanotechnology Workshop

   

Science Content Expert: Paul Weiss (University of California, Los Angeles)

Communication Researchers: Elizabeth Corley (Arizona State University) and Dietram Scheufele (University of Wisconsin, Madison)

Communication Practitioner: Julia Moore (Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars)

Facilitator: Richard Tanenbaum

12:15-1:30   Lunch

1:30-3:30   Continuation of concurrent workshops

3:30-4:00   Break and return to auditorium
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2014. The Science of Science Communication II: Summary of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18478.
×
4:00-5:00   Reports from the workshops

Moderator: Alan Leshner (American Association for the Advancement of Science)


5:00–5:15   Closing remarks

Alan Leshner (American Association for the Advancement of Science)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2014. The Science of Science Communication II: Summary of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18478.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2014. The Science of Science Communication II: Summary of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18478.
×
Page106
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2014. The Science of Science Communication II: Summary of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18478.
×
Page107
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2014. The Science of Science Communication II: Summary of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18478.
×
Page108
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2014. The Science of Science Communication II: Summary of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18478.
×
Page109
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Agenda." National Academy of Sciences. 2014. The Science of Science Communication II: Summary of a Colloquium. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18478.
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The Science of Science Communication II: Summary of a Colloquium Get This Book
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Successful scientists must be effective communicators within their professions. Without those skills, they could not write papers and funding proposals, give talks and field questions, or teach classes and mentor students. However, communicating with audiences outside their profession - people who may not share scientists' interests, technical background, cultural assumptions, and modes of expression - presents different challenges and requires additional skills. Communication about science in political or social settings differs from discourse within a scientific discipline. Not only are scientists just one of many stakeholders vying for access to the public agenda, but the political debates surrounding science and its applications may sometimes confront scientists with unfamiliar and uncomfortable discussions involving religious values, partisan interests, and even the trustworthiness of science.

The Science of Science Communication II is the summary of a Sackler Colloquium convened in September 2013 At this event, leading social, behavioral, and decision scientists, other scientists, and communication practitioners shared current research that can improve the communication of science to lay audiences. In the Sackler Colloquia tradition, the meeting also allowed social and natural scientists to identify new opportunities to collaborate and advance their own research, while improving public engagement with science. Speakers provided evidence-based guidance on how to listen to others so as to identify their information needs, ways of thinking about the world, and the cultural stereotypes regarding scientists. They delved deeply into the incentive systems that shape what scientists study and how they report their work, the subtle changes in framing that can influence how messages are interpreted, the complex channels that determine how messages flow, and the potential politicization of scientific evidence.

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