National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Participants
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×

C

Workshop Agenda

Strategies for Cost-Effective and Flexible Biodetection Systems
That Ensure Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health
Officials: A Workshop


AGENDA

National Academy of Sciences Building, Room 125
2101 Constitution Avenue, NW • Washington, DC 20001


The Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council will host a 2-day workshop that will explore alternative cost-effective systems that would meet requirements for BioWatch as an automated detection system for aerosolized agents (alternative technologies for autonomous detection). Systems identified need to be capable of being deployed by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) by 2018 and enabling day-to-day environmental surveillance that would be of value to the public health and medical community.

Workshop Objectives:

•   Develop an understanding of the nature of the biothreat and the role of biodetection.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×

•   Discuss the history of the BioWatch program and the draft request for proposals (RFP) released by DHS for alternative technologies for autonomous detection.

•   Discuss the role of public health officials and laboratorians in the interpretation of BioWatch data and the information that is needed from a system for effective decision making.

•   Review the current state of the art and explore the potential use of four families of biodetection technology for the BioWatch program.

•   Explore how the technologies discussed might be strategically combined or deployed to optimize their contributions to an effective environmental detection capability.

DAY ONE

8:00 a.m.

Breakfast available for planning committee and speakers

8:30 a.m.

Welcome, Introductions, and Meeting Objectives

WILLIAM RAUB, Chair, Workshop Planning Committee

Science Advisor to the Secretary (Retired)

Department of Health and Human Services

SALLY PHILLIPS

Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary (Acting)

Office of Health Affairs

Department of Homeland Security

SESSION I: OVERVIEW OF THE BIOWATCH PROGRAM

Session Objectives: Develop an understanding of the nature of the biothreat and the role of biodetection. Discuss the history of the BioWatch Program and the draft RFP released by the Department of Homeland Security regarding alternative technologies for autonomous detection.

8:45 a.m.

Nature of the Biothreat

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
 

Moderator:

WILLIAM RAUB

Science Advisor to the Secretary (Retired)

Department of Health and Human Services

ROBERT KADLEC

Consultant

RPK Consulting LLC

Former Special Assistant to the President for Homeland Security

Former Senior Director for Biological Defense Policy

White House Homeland Security Council

5 Minutes for Questions

9:05 a.m.

BioWatch Program History

JEFFREY RUNGE

Principal

The Chertoff Group

Assistant Secretary for Health Affairs and Chief Medical Officer (2005–2008)

Department of Homeland Security

5 Minutes for Questions

9:25 a.m.

Current BioWatch Program, Technology, and Autonomous Detection

MICHAEL V. WALTER

Detection Branch Chief

BioWatch Program Manager

Office of Health Affairs

Department of Homeland Security

20 Minutes for Discussion (specific to the BioWatch Program and alternative technologies for autonomous detection)

10:05 a.m.

Break

SESSION II: PUBLIC HEALTH AND DECISION MAKERS

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×

Session Objectives: Discuss role of public health officials and laboratorians in the interpretation of BioWatch results. What information is needed to call a BioWatch Actionable Result (BAR) (i.e., a positive result, not necessarily a threat to public health) in the current system? What information would be needed for confidence in a BAR determined using an automated detection system? Once a BAR is determined, what data are needed for analysis and to help determine if there is a threat to public health (i.e., what decisions or actions may be taken as result of a BAR)?

10:20 a.m.

Panel Discussion: BioWatch—Information for Decision Making

Moderator:

SUZET M. MCKINNEY

Deputy Commissioner

Bureau of Public Health Preparedness and Emergency Response

Division of Women & Children’s Health

Chicago Department of Public Health

Rapporteur:

BETH MALDIN MORGENTHAU

Assistant Commissioner

Bureau of Policy, Community Resilience and Response

Office of Emergency Preparedness and Response

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

Commissioned Paper Writer:

SANDRA SMOLE

Director

Division of Molecular Diagnostics and Virology

Bureau of Laboratory Sciences

Massachusetts Department of Public Health

Panel:

UMAIR A. SHAH

Executive Director

Local Health Authority

Harris County Public Health and Environmental Services

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
 

DAVID PERSSE

Emergency Medical Services Physician Director

Public Health Authority

City of Houston

ERICA PAN

Deputy Health Officer and Director

Division of Communicable Disease Control & Prevention

Alameda County Public Health Department

COLIN STIMMLER

Director of the BioWatch Program

New York Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

JOHN PLANTE

Senior Manager of Emergency Preparedness

Chicago Transit Authority

12:15 p.m.

Break for Lunch (lunch available for planning committee and speakers)

SESSION III: REVIEW OF POTENTIAL TECHNOLOGIES FOR
THE BIOWATCH PROGRAM

Session Objectives: Explore the potential use of four families of technology for the BioWatch Program: (1) nucleic acid signatures, (2) immunoassays and protein signatures, (3) genomic sequencing, and (4) mass spectrometry.

1:00 p.m.

Panel: State of the Art for Autonomous Detection Systems Using Nucleic Acid Signatures

Moderator:

JOHN VITKO

Rector

St. Luke Church

Director of Biological and Chemical Countermeasures for Science and Technology Directorate (Retired)

Department of Homeland Security

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
 

Rapporteur:

WILLIAM O’NEILL

Development Program Manager and Project Engineer

Biohazard Detection System

U.S. Postal Service

Commissioned Paper Writer:

RAYMOND P. MARIELLA, JR.

Senior Scientist

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Panel:

DAVID TILLES

Vice President

CBRNE Defense

Northrop Grumman

M. ALLEN NORTHRUP

Chief Executive Officer

Northrup Consulting Group

STEVAN JOVANOVICH

Co-Founder and Chief Technology Officer

IntegenX, Inc.

IVOR KNIGHT

Senior Vice President and Chief Technology Officer

Canon U.S. Life Sciences, Inc.

3:00 p.m.

Break

3:15 p.m.

Panel: State of the Art for Autonomous Detection Systems Using Immunoassays and Protein Signatures

Moderator:

WILLIAM RAUB, Chair, Workshop Planning Committee

Science Advisor to the Secretary (Retired)

Department of Health and Human Services

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
 

Rapporteur:

THOMAS SLEZAK

Associate Program Leader

Informatics for the Global Security Program

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Commissioned Paper Writer:

R. PAUL SCHAUDIES

Chief Executive Officer

GenArraytion, Inc.

Panel:

AMY ALTMAN

Vice President

Biodefense and Food Safety

Luminex Corporation

TED OLSEN

Chief Executive Officer and President

PathSensors, Inc.

ANDREW BARTKO

Principal Scientist

Battelle Memorial Institute

DAVID HANLON

Director

Business Development and Strategic Collaborations

Quanterix

5:00 p.m.

Concluding Remarks

WILLIAM RAUB, Chair, Workshop Planning Committee

Science Advisor to the Secretary (Retired)

Department of Health and Human Services

5:30 p.m.

Adjurn

Room will be open until 6:30 and participants are encouraged to continue conversations.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×

DAY TWO

8:15 a.m.

Breakfast available for planning committee and speakers

8:45 a.m.

Welcome and Overview

WILLIAM RAUB, Chair, Workshop Planning Committee

Science Advisor to the Secretary (Retired)

Department of Health and Human Services

SESSION III (CONT.): REVIEW OF POTENTIAL
TECHNOLOGIES FOR THE BIOWATCH PROGRAM

Session Objectives (cont.): Explore the potential use of four families of technology for the BioWatch Program: (1) nucleic acid signatures, (2) immunoassays and protein signatures, (3) genomic sequencing, and (4) mass spectrometry.

9:00 a.m.

Panel: State of the Art for Autonomous Detection Systems Using Genomic Sequencing

Moderator:

RITA COLWELL

Distinguished University Professor

University of Maryland

Johns Hopkins University

School of Public Health

Rapporteur:

ERIC EISENSTADT

Independent Technical Consultant

Commissioned Paper Writers:

CHRIS DETTER

Bio-Threat/Bio-Defense Program Director

Emerging Threats Program Office

Global Security and Bioscience Division

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
 

GARY RESNICK

Independent Consultant

Guest Scientist

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Panel:

JEFFREY SCHLOSS

Director, Division of Genome Sciences

Program Director, Technology Development and Coordination

Extramural Research Program

National Human Genome Research Institute

National Institutes of Health

THOMAS CEBULA

Chief Technical Officer

CosmosID™

Visiting Professor

Johns Hopkins University

BRIAN YOUNG

Program Manager

Battelle Memorial Institute

10:30 a.m.

Break

10:45 a.m.

Panel: State of the Art for Autonomous Detection Systems Using Mass Spectrometry

Moderator:

DONALD PROSNITZ

Independent Consultant

Rapporteur:

CHARLES KOLB

President and Chief Executive Officer

Aerodyne Research, Inc.

Commissioned Paper Writers:

A. PETER SNYDER

Private Citizen

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
 

RABIH JABBOUR

Private Citizen

Panel:

RUDOLPH JOHNSON

Acting Manager

Emergency Response Branch

Division of Laboratory Sciences

National Center for Environmental Health

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

ERIC E. GARD

Scientist

Defense Biology Division

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

ZHENG OUYANG

Associate Professor

Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering

Purdue University

SESSION IV: TECHNOLOGIES AS PART OF COMPLETE
ENVIRONMENTAL DETECTION CAPABILITY

Session Objectives: Review the themes and key points from previous panel discussions. Explore how the technologies discussed might be strategically combined or deployed to optimize their contributions to an effective environmental detection capability. Additional consideration of technologies and how they might fit together as whole system (e.g., modular, hybrid, etc.).

1:30 p.m.

Panel of Rapporteurs

Moderator:

WILLIAM RAUB, Chair, Workshop Planning Committee

Science Advisor to the Secretary (Retired)

Department of Health and Human Services

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
 

Panel:

BETH MALDIN MORGENTHAU

Assistant Commissioner

Bureau of Policy, Community Resilience and Response

Office of Emergency Preparedness and Response

New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene

SANDRA SMOLE

Director

Division of Molecular Diagnostics and Virology

Bureau of Laboratory Sciences

Massachusetts Department of Public Health

WILLIAM O’NEILL

Development Program Manager and Project Engineer

Biohazard Detection System

U.S. Postal Service

THOMAS SLEZAK

Associate Program Leader

Informatics for the Global Security Program

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

CHARLES KOLB

President and Chief Executive Officer

Aerodyne Research, Inc.

ERIC EISENSTADT

Independent Technical Consultant

3:00 p.m.

Concluding Remarks

WILLIAM RAUB, Chair, Workshop Planning Committee

Science Advisor to the Secretary (Retired)

Department of Health and Human Services

3:30 p.m.

Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
Page123
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
Page124
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
Page125
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
Page126
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
Page127
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
Page128
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
Page129
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
Page130
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
Page131
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
Page132
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
Page133
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18495.
×
Page134
Next: Appendix D: Registered Attendees »
Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch: Ensuring Timely and Accurate Information for Public Health Officials: Workshop Summary Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $68.00 Buy Ebook | $54.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The BioWatch program, funded and overseen by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), has three main elements--sampling, analysis, and response--each coordinated by different agencies. The Environmental Protection Agency maintains the sampling component, the sensors that collect airborne particles. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention coordinates analysis and laboratory testing of the samples, though testing is actually carried out in state and local public health laboratories. Local jurisdictions are responsible for the public health response to positive findings. The Federal Bureau of Investigation is designated as the lead agency for the law enforcement response if a bioterrorism event is detected. In 2003 DHS deployed the first generation of BioWatch air samplers. The current version of this technology, referred to as Generation 2.0, requires daily manual collection and testing of air filters from each monitor. DHS has also considered newer automated technologies (Generation 2.5 and Generation 3.0) which have the potential to produce results more quickly, at a lower cost, and for a greater number of threat agents.

Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch is the summary of a workshop hosted jointly by the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council in June 2013 to explore alternative cost-effective systems that would meet the requirements for a BioWatch Generation 3.0 autonomous detection system, or autonomous detector, for aerosolized agents . The workshop discussions and presentations focused on examination of the use of four classes of technologies--nucleic acid signatures, protein signatures, genomic sequencing, and mass spectrometry--that could reach Technology Readiness Level (TRL) 6-plus in which the technology has been validated and is ready to be tested in a relevant environment over three different tiers of temporal timeframes: those technologies that could be TRL 6-plus ready as part of an integrated system by 2016, those that are likely to be ready in the period 2016 to 2020, and those are not likely to be ready until after 2020. Technologies to Enable Autonomous Detection for BioWatch discusses the history of the BioWatch program, the role of public health officials and laboratorians in the interpretation of BioWatch data and the information that is needed from a system for effective decision making, and the current state of the art of four families of technology for the BioWatch program. This report explores how the technologies discussed might be strategically combined or deployed to optimize their contributions to an effective environmental detection capability.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!