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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
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A

Workshop Agenda

Strategies for Scaling Tested and Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children’s Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: A Workshop

Hosted by the IOM-NRC Forum on Promoting Children’s Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health

April 1-2, 2014

Lecture Room National Academy of Sciences Building 2101 Constitution Ave., NW, Washington, DC

AGENDA

Research has advanced understanding of the risk, promotive, and protective factors within families that influence children’s health and well-being. Science consistently indicates the important role of families in shaping child and adolescent health outcomes through genetics, behavior, environment, and their inherent dynamic interactions. Early childhood conditions in the home, mediated by caregiver behaviors such as nutrition, physical activity, communication styles, sleep, and stress management, shape health and well-being across the life course. Families can create resilience or can increase risk for later negative cognitive, affective, and behavioral outcomes.

Objective: This workshop will address the successes and challenges of scaling family-focused interventions to the real world for promoting children’s cognitive, affective, and behavioral health. A range of settings involved in preventive family-focused interventions will be highlighted, including primary care settings, schools, and homes. The workshop will explore issues of funding, such as the role of the Patient Protection and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×

Affordable Care Act (ACA), in promoting family-focused prevention interventions. Collectively, this knowledge will be used to explore new and innovative ways to broaden the reach and demand for effective programs and to generate alternative paradigms for strengthening families.

Day 1: Tuesday, April 1, 2014

 
8:15 a.m. Welcome and Presentation of Forum Mission
 
William Beardslee, M.D., Gardner/Monks Professor of Child Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Forum Co-Chair
 
C. Hendricks Brown, Ph.D., Professor, Departments of Psychiatry, Behavioral Sciences, and Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University, Forum Co-Chair
 
8:25 a.m. Workshop Overview
 
J. David Hawkins, Ph.D., Social Work Endowed Professor of Prevention, University of Washington School of Social Work, Planning Committee Chair
 
8:30 a.m. Keynote Address: The House That Evidence-Based Practice Built: Moving from Program Development to Real-World Outcomes
 
Lauren Supplee, Ph.D., Director, Division of Family Strengthening, Administration on Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Planning Committee
 
9:00 a.m. Panel I: Developer Perspectives of Successes and Challenges in Scaling Family-Focused Preventive Interventions

This panel will discuss family-focused interventions that have demonstrated effectiveness in practice and that have been brought to scale. Panelists will offer the developer’s perspective of efficacious programs across different sectors (e.g., homes, child welfare settings) and reflect on what has made their application to scale successful, as well as what challenges they faced. Speakers will target programs within specific time periods in development that span prenatal development to early adulthood.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×
Moderator: J. David Hawkins, Ph.D., Social Work Endowed Professor of Prevention, University of Washington School of Social Work, Planning Committee Chair
 
David L. Olds, Ph.D., Professor of Pediatrics and Director, Prevention Research Center for Family and Child Health, Department of Pediatrics, University of Colorado at Denver (20 min)
 
Carolyn Webster-Stratton, Ph.D., M.S., M.P.H., Professor Emeritus, University of Washington; Developer, The Incredible Years® Programs (20 min)
 
Ron Prinz, Ph.D., Professor and Director, Parenting & Family Research Center, University of South Carolina (20 min)
 
Patricia Chamberlain, Ph.D., Research Scientist, Oregon Social Learning Center (20 min)
 
DISCUSSION
 
10:45 a.m. BREAK
 
11:00 a.m. Panel II: State and Federal Perspectives of Successes and Challenges in Scaling Family-Focused Preventive Interventions

This panel will continue the discussion of the themes explored in Panel I, but will broaden the perspective to include those who enable the programs to reach end users. Panelists will provide both the state and federal viewpoint.

Moderator: Pat Shea, M.S.W., M.A., Deputy Director, Office of Technical Assistance, National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors, Planning Committee
 
Lisa Hill, Executive Director, Invest in Kids (Colorado) (20 min)
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×
 
Brian Bumbarger, Ph.D., Assistant Director for Knowledge Translation and Dissemination, Prevention Research Center, Pennsylvania State University (20 min)
 
Kimberly Hoagwood, Ph.D., Professor and Vice Chair for Research, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York University School of Medicine (20 min)
 
Clarese Holden, Ph.D., Branch Chief, Division of State Programs, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (20 min)
 
 
DISCUSSION
 
12:45 p.m. LUNCH
 
1:30 p.m. Panel III: Extending and Disseminating Family-Focused Preventive Interventions

This panel will illustrate emerging settings where family-focused preventive interventions are being provided, including primary care settings and schools, and will discuss opportunities and challenges going forward. Programs that will be described target infancy through childhood and early adolescence.

Moderator: Mary Ann McCabe, Ph.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, George Washington University School of Medicine, Planning Committee
 
Margot Kaplan-Sanoff, Ed.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Boston Medical Center, National Director, Healthy Steps, Boston University School of Medicine (20 min)
 
Ellen C. Perrin, M.D., Research Director, Division of Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics, Floating Hospital for Children, Tufts Medical Center; Professor of Pediatrics, Tufts Medical School (20 min)
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×
 
Guillermo (“Willy”) Prado, Ph.D., Professor and Director, Division of Prevention Science and Community Health, Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine (20 min)
 
Thomas J. Dishion, Ph.D., Director, Prevention Research Center; Professor, Psychology Arizona State University (20 min)
 
DISCUSSION
 
3:15 p.m. BREAK
 
3:30 p.m. Panel IV: Financing and Infrastructure

This panel will discuss themes related to financing and infrastructure to support scaling of family-focused preventive interventions. Topics of discussion will include the results of benefit–cost analyses in Washington State, financing of behavioral health interventions through Medicaid, the current administration’s interest in supporting scaling of evidence-based initiatives through the tiered evidence structure and Pay for Success, and how the ACA will affect primary care to support implementation of family-focused interventions.

Moderator: Ruth Perou, Ph.D., Child Development Studies Team Leader, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Planning Committee
 
Stephanie Lee, M.A., Senior Research Associate, Washington State Institute for Public Policy (20 min)
 
Kathryn B. Stack, Advisor for Evidence-Based Innovation, U.S. Office of Management and Budget (20 min)
 
MaryBeth Musumeci, J.D., Associate Director, Kaiser Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured (20 min)
 
DISCUSSION
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×
 
4:55 p.m. Closing Remarks
 
J. David Hawkins, Ph.D., Social Work Endowed Professor of Prevention, University of Washington School of Social Work, Planning Committee Chair
 
5:00 p.m. Adjourn for Day

Day 2: Wednesday, April 2, 2014

8:30 a.m. Welcome and Recap of Day 1
 
J. David Hawkins, Ph.D., Social Work Endowed Professor of Prevention, University of Washington School of Social Work, Planning Committee Chair
 
8:45 a.m. Keynote Address
 
Amy Wetherby, Ph.D., Distinguished Research Professor and L.L. Schendel Professor of Communication Disorders, Department of Clinical Sciences, Director, Autism Institute, Florida State University College of Medicine
 
 
9:15 a.m. Panel V: Changing Contexts and Alternative Models

This session will explore alternative models in family-focused interventions across systems, including international models, and describe possibilities to integrate new and generalized knowledge into local settings.

Moderator: William Beardslee, M.D., Gardner/Monks Professor of Child Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Planning Committee
 
Richard Spoth, Ph.D., Director, Partnerships in Prevention Science Institute, Iowa State University (20 min)
 
Terje G. Ogden, Ph.D., Research Director, Norwegian Center for Child Behavioral Development, University of Oslo (20 min)
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×
 
Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus, Ph.D., Bat-Yaacov Professor of Child Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences; Director, Center for HIV Identification, Prevention and Treatment Services, Semel Institute and the Department of Psychiatry, University of California, Los Angeles (20 min)
 
DISCUSSION
 
10:40 a.m. BREAK
 
10:55 a.m. Keys to Effective Scaling: Lessons Learned from Various Fields and Sectors
 
Joe McCannon, Consultant to The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; Former Senior Advisor to the Administrator and Group Director of Learning and Diffusion, Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services
 
11:25 a.m. Panel VI: Synthesis and Way Forward

This panel will discuss and synthesize the common themes and principles from the workshop. Members of the workshop planning committee will serve as discussants.

J. David Hawkins, Ph.D., Social Work Endowed Professor of Prevention, University of Washington School of Social Work
 
Pat Shea, M.S.W., M.A., Deputy Director, Office of Technical Assistance, National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors
 
Mary Ann McCabe, Ph.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, George Washington University School of Medicine
 
Ruth Perou, Ph.D., Child Development Studies Team Leader, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×
 
William Beardslee, M.D., Gardner/Monks Professor of Child Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School
 
Lauren Supplee, Ph.D., Director, Division of Family Strengthening, Administration on Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
 
DISCUSSION
 
12:10 p.m. Closing Remarks
 
J. David Hawkins, Ph.D., Social Work Endowed Professor of Prevention, University of Washington School of Social Work, Planning Committee Chair
 
12:15 p.m. Adjourn Workshop
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×
Page85
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×
Page86
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×
Page87
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×
Page88
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×
Page89
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×
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Next: Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches »
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Over the last three decades, researchers have made remarkable progress in creating and testing family-focused programs aimed at fostering the cognitive, affective, and behavioral health of children. These programs include universal interventions, such as those for expecting or new parents, and workshops for families whose children are entering adolescence, as well as programs targeted to especially challenged parents, such as low-income single teens about to have their first babies, or the parents of children with autism. Some family-focused programs have been shown to foster significantly better outcomes in children, including enhanced educational performance, and reduced rates of teen pregnancy, substance abuse, and child conduct and delinquency, as well as reduced child abuse. The favorable cost-benefit ratios of some of these programs are due, in part, to the multiple and far-ranging effects that family-focused prevention programs targeting children can have. Other family-focused programs have shown success in smaller academic studies but have not been widely applied, or have not worked as effectively or failed when applied to more diverse real-world settings.

Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health is the summary of a workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine Forum on Promoting Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health to explore effective preventive interventions for youth that can modify risk and promote protective factors that are linked to mental, emotional, and behavioral health, and how to apply this existing knowledge. Based on the 2009 report Preventing Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Disorders Among Young People, this report considers how to build a stronger research and practice base around the development and implementation of programs, practices, and policies that foster children's health and well-being across the country, while engaging multi-sectorial stakeholders. While research has advanced understanding of risk, promotive, and protective factors in families that influence the health and well-being of youth, a challenge remains to provide family-focused interventions across child and adolescent development at sufficient scale and reach to significantly reduce the incidence and prevalence of negative cognitive, affective, and behavioral outcomes in children and adolescents nationwide, as well as to develop widespread demand for effective programs by end users. This report explores new and innovative ways to broaden the reach and demand for effective programs and to generate alternative paradigms for strengthening families.

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