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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
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B

Speaker Biosketches

Brian Bumbarger, M.Ed., is the Assistant Director for Knowledge Translation and Dissemination at the Prevention Research Center at Pennsylvania State University, and an adjunct Senior Research Fellow at the Key Centre for Ethics, Law, Justice and Governance at Griffith University (Queensland, Australia). He is the principal investigator and Founding Director of the Evidence-based Prevention and Intervention Support Center (EPISCenter), an intermediary organization supporting the scale-up of more than 300 evidence-based prevention programs and community prevention coalitions throughout Pennsylvania. For nearly two decades Mr. Bumbarger has conducted research on the dissemination, implementation, and sustainability of evidence-based programs and practices. He has been the principal investigator on several longitudinal studies of program implementation, effectiveness, and sustainability, and has published a number of articles, book chapters, and state and federal policy papers on prevention and implementation science. Mr. Bumbarger serves on federal expert panels for the National Institute on Drug Abuse, U.S. Department of Education, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Administration for Children and Families, and regularly provides testimony before state legislatures, Congress, and to a number of foreign governments. In 2012 Mr. Bumbarger was elected to the Board of Directors of the international Society for Prevention Research.

Patricia Chamberlain, Ph.D., is a research scientist at the Oregon Social Learning Center. Dr. Chamberlain’s interest in developing interventions for children and families emerged from her early work as a special education

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×

teacher. She has conducted several studies on treatment for children, youth, and families in the juvenile justice, mental health, and child welfare systems. She founded the Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care (MTFC) (www.mtfc.com) and Keeping Foster and Kin Parents Supported and Trained (KEEP) (www.keepfostering.org) intervention models. MTFC is an alternative to group, residential, and institutional placement for youngsters with severe antisocial behavior and mental health problems. KEEP provides enhanced support and training to state foster and kinship parents to prevent placement disruptions, improve reunification rates, and reduce child behavioral and emotional problems. She has been the principal investigator on eight randomized trials examining the efficacy of parent-mediated intervention approaches. A current area of focus is implementation research which examines what it takes to integrate and scale up evidence-based practices to real-world agencies and systems. Dr. Chamberlain is also doing research on the development of intervention models for adolescent girls in the juvenile justice and child welfare systems that address girls’ unique needs. In addition to working on research aimed at improving outcomes for youth and foster and biological families, she is interested in how to support child public service systems to improve the efficiency of their routine practices. She is involved in helping communities in the United States and Europe implement MTFC and KEEP and is a partner in Treatment Foster Care Consultants Inc.

Thomas Dishion, Ph.D., is the director of the Prevention Research Center and a professor of psychology at the Arizona State University. His translational program of research involves the study of relationship dynamics in generating and maintaining psychopathology and drug and alcohol abuse in children and adolescents. He developed the Family Check-Up model as a specific intervention strategy that promotes family resilience and reduces risk. He is currently leading an effort to support communities and agencies wishing to adopt the Family Check-Up strategy as a framework for service delivery for children and families. He has led several randomized studies evaluating the effects of family-centered interventions over the past 25 years. He has published more than 200 scientific reports on these topics, a book for parents on family management, and 3 books for professionals working with troubled children and their families.

Lisa Hill is Executive Director of Invest in Kids. For 15 years Invest in Kids has been committed to improving the health and well-being of vulnerable young children and low-income families throughout Colorado by bringing proven, prevention programs into communities across the state. Invest in Kids currently implements two research-based programs statewide: Nurse–Family Partnership and The Incredible Years®. Ms. Hill

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
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leads Invest in Kids by strategically supporting and directing the organization to advance the quality services they provide and expand the number of vulnerable families and children served by their selected programs. She manages a robust internal organization of 18 professional and support staff and a board of directors with 10 members. She has led a culture that values leadership development, efficient systems, strong financial management, staff productivity, and commitment to mission. Ms. Hill’s leadership in the nonprofit sector is evident in her strong community connections and active engagement with Invest in Kids’s partners throughout the state. She has been publicly recognized by her award of the Bonfils-Stanton Foundation Livingston Fellowship, participation in the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s Leadership Denver Class of 2013 as well as the El Pomar Foundation’s Nonprofit Executive Leadership Program, and most recently was named the 2014 9NEWS Leader of the Year. Ms. Hill holds a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Kimberly Eaton Hoagwood, Ph.D., is Vice Chair for Research and Professor of Clinical Psychology in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the New York University (NYU) School of Medicine. Her research portfolio focuses on four areas: child, adolescent, and family outcomes; parent engagement and activation; implementation science in policy contexts; and quality measurement. She also works with the Division of Child, Adolescent and Family Services at the New York State Office of Mental Health (NYSOMH). Dr. Hoagwood received her B.A. in English from American University in Washington, DC, and her M.A. in psychology from Catholic University in Washington, DC. She received her Ph.D. in school psychology from the University of Maryland, College Park. Prior to joining the faculty at NYU, Dr. Hoagwood was Professor of Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry at Columbia University. Before that, she was Associate Director for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Research in the Office of the Director at the National Institute of Mental Health, where she also directed the Child and Adolescent Services Research program for 10 years. Dr. Hoagwood is Director and principal investigator of a National Institute of Mental Health–funded Advanced Center on Implementation and Dissemination of Evidence-based Practices Among States (also called the IDEAS Center). She also directs the Community Technical Assistance Center and the Evidence-based Treatment Dissemination Center, both funded by the NYSOMH. She is principal investigator on several other major grants and subcontracts, all focused on improving the quality of services and outcomes for children and families.

Clarese V. Holden, Ph.D., has been working in the substance abuse prevention and treatment field in the Federal Government Service for 30 years.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×

Dr. Holden began working for the Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP) in 1989. SAMHSA was known at that time as the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration (ADAMHA) and CSAP was known as the Office for Substance Abuse Prevention (OSAP). In 1991, Dr. Holden, upon accepting a position, moved from prevention to treatment in the Office for Treatment Improvement (OTI). ADAMHA was reorganized, currently named SAMHSA and a couple years later, Dr. Holden was offered another position in CSAP. In 1998, Dr. Holden was selected by one of the largest think tanks in the world, the Brookings Institute located in Washington, DC, as a Brookings Institute Legislative Fellow. Dr. Holden was soon offered a fellowship as a LEGIS Fellow on Capitol Hill. Upon completing her fellowship, Dr. Holden returned to SAMHSA/CSAP. Dr. Holden has been a Federal Government Project Officer for almost every state and a number of U.S. jurisdictions to include Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. She served as the Special Projects Officer for Director of the CSAP Division of State Programs until 2007 when she was promoted to Senior Public Health Advisor. She served as the lead on the substance abuse prevention set-aside of the Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant and the lead on an expert workgroup of researchers and evaluators who responded to the president’s health reform initiative related to substance abuse prevention and mental, emotional, and behavior disorders. Currently, Dr. Holden is the Branch Chief of CSAP’s Division of State Programs, where she leads two teams of State Project Officers who monitor the 20 percent set aside of the Substance Abuse Block Grant and two discretionary grant programs, the Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant Program and the Partnership for Success Grant Program. She also supports the work of the SAMHSA Project Launch initiative.

Margot Kaplan-Sanoff, Ed.D., is Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine and Boston Medical Center where she is Director of Child Development Training for the pediatric residents from the combined joint residency program at Boston Medical Center and Boston Children’s Hospital. She is also National Director of the Healthy Steps for Young Children Program, responsible for developing the curriculum and parent materials and providing the ongoing training and technical assistance to more than 70 sites nationwide who are implementing the Healthy Steps Program in their pediatric practices. Healthy Steps promotes the emotional well-being of very young children and their families using primary care pediatrics as a service delivery system. She was Director of Pediatric Pathways to Success at Boston Medical Center, an enhanced approach to pediatric care providing families with child development information,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
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family support, and advocacy as part of routine well-child visits. As Director, Dr. Kaplan-Sanoff provided program development and clinical supervision to the seven family advocates and child development specialists on the Pathways team. Dr. Kaplan-Sanoff directed Early Matters, a Maternal and Child Health Bureau project to create a website called Brain Wonders (www.zerotothree.org) for pediatricians, parents, and child care providers on brain development and early literacy and was Director of Sharing Books with Babies, an early literacy training initiative for early care and education providers caring for infants and toddlers. Dr. Kaplan-Sanoff has more than 40 years of experience in the fields of early childhood, special education, pediatrics, and family support. She served as the Child Development Content Specialist for the Head Start Quality Initiative, the Training and Technical Assistance Network for Region 1 with responsibilities for providing technical assistance to Early/Head Start programs throughout New England. As Co-Director of the Child Development Project, she developed, implemented, refined, and evaluated a community-based child development program within a hospital setting that served more than 1,500 children and families in the first 5 years of the project. She was also Director of Steps for Kids: A Family Recovery Outreach Project, a training grant which provided training for all professionals working with substance-abusing women and their children. She has conducted mother–infant groups for Women and Infants Clinic, a family-focused intervention program that offered drug treatment services to cocaine-addicted mothers within the context of pediatric and child development services for their babies. She is currently working with opiate-dependent mothers and their newborns. For 8 years Dr. Kaplan-Sanoff was assistant professor at Wheelock College and Co-Director of the Birth to Seven Training Grant at Wheelock College, a personnel preparation grant designed to train early intervention, child life specialists, and preschool special educators through the graduate education program that emphasized medical-educational collaboration and family-focused intervention.

Stephanie Lee, M.A., is a Senior Research Associate at the Washington State Institute for Public Policy (WSIPP), a nonpartisan organization created by the legislature to carry out practical research on issues of importance to Washington. Since 2007, she has focused on identifying and evaluating the research evidence for programs and policies that affect children, particularly in the areas of child welfare and mental health. Her current work is centered on estimating the long-term economic impacts of strategies to improve outcomes for people in the state of Washington. She leads WSIPP’s work with the Results First initiative, a collaboration between the MacArthur Foundation and the Pew Charitable Trusts. This project aims to develop and extend the capability of WSIPP’s benefit–cost software, and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×

to support other states in using the WSIPP benefit–cost approach in their own specific contexts.

Joe McCannon is the former Senior Advisor to the Administrator at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Before joining CMS, Mr. McCannon was vice president and faculty on large-scale improvement at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI). At CMS, Mr. McCannon helped to implement major pieces of the President’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act legislation, including launching the Center for Medicare & Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) and several other national programs. At IHI, Mr. McCannon drove organizational efforts to spread change in Africa, the United States, and several other regions. He led the organization’s collaboration with the World Health Organization on the 3 by 5 Initiative and directed its major domestic initiatives to improve patient safety, the 100,000 Lives Campaign and the 5 Million Lives Campaign. Mr. McCannon has advised or consulted with other large-scale quality improvement efforts in Canada, Denmark, England, Japan, and the United States. He has also been involved with large-scale initiatives outside health care in areas including homelessness and corrections. He started his career in the publishing industry with roles at Fast Company, The Atlantic Monthly, and Outside magazines. He is a graduate of Harvard University and was a Reuters and Merck Fellow at Stanford University. He is presently a consultant to The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

MaryBeth Musumeci, J.D., is an Associate Director at the Kaiser Family Foundation’s Commission on Medicaid and the Uninsured, where she concentrates on Medicaid for people with disabilities, including issues related to people dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid and long-term services and supports. Prior to joining the Commission staff, she held a Reuschlein Clinical Teaching Fellowship at Villanova University School of Law and spent 8 years as a civil legal aid lawyer, most recently as the Deputy Legal Advocacy Director of the Disabilities Law Program at Community Legal Aid Society, Inc., in Wilmington, Delaware, where her practice focused on Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income, other public benefits programs, and civil rights and accessibility issues. Previously, she developed and taught a seminar in Public Benefits Law at Widener University School of Law, clerked in the Delaware Family Court, and held an Independence Foundation Public Interest Law Fellowship representing women transitioning from welfare to work in Chester, Pennsylvania. She received her B.A. with highest honors from Douglass College, Rutgers University, and her J.D. from Harvard Law School.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×

Terje Ogden, Ph.D., holds the position as Research Director at the Norwegian Center for Child Behavioral Development, Unirand and is also professor at the Institute of Psychology, University of Oslo, Norway. He has specialized in intervention and implementation research and interests include clinical trials and large-scale implementation of empirically supported interventions targeting antisocial children and youth. Included are studies of moderators and mediators of effective interventions. Dr. Ogden is an experienced lecturer and presenter at seminars and conferences in Norway as well as internationally (for publications see www.ogden.no). Starting in 1998, Dr. Ogden was appointed the director of a Norwegian national research program on the implementation and evaluation of empirically supported programs for the prevention and treatment of serious behavior problems in children and youth. Ogden has published a number of articles on evidence-based treatments of children and youth with conduct problems within the context of schools, child welfare, and mental health services. He has also authored several books on the prevention and treatment of mental health and behavior problems and on the development and promotion of social competence in children and youth. Dr. Ogden is also the project leader of an ongoing longitudinal prospective study of the behavioral and social development of children in which approximately 1,200 children are followed from 6 months to fourth grade in primary school (The Behavior Outlook Norwegian Developmental Study, or BONDS). From 2005, the main objective of this study has been to determine the developmental trajectories of childrens’ behavior and their determinants.

David Olds, Ph.D., is Professor of Pediatrics, Psychiatry, Public Health, and Nursing at the University of Colorado at Denver, where he directs the Prevention Research Center for Family and Child Health. He has devoted his career to investigating methods of preventing health and developmental problems in children and parents from low-income families by improving the conditions for pregnancy and early childrearing. The primary focus of his work has been on developing and testing in a series of randomized controlled trials a program of prenatal and infancy home visiting by nurses known as the Nurse–Family Partnership (NFP), which serves socially disadvantaged mothers bearing first children. Today, the program is operating in more than 440 counties, serving more than 23,000 families per year in the United States. Dr. Olds also is working with governments to adapt and test the NFP in international contexts, including Australia, Canada, England, the Netherlands, Northern Ireland, and Scotland. A member of the American Pediatrics Society, the Society for Prevention Research, and the Academy of Experimental Criminology, Dr. Olds has received numerous awards for his work, including the Charles A. Dana Award for Pioneering Achievements in Health, the Lela Rowland Prevention Award

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×

from the National Mental Health Association, the Brooke Visiting Professorship in Epidemiology from the Royal Society of Medicine, and the 2008 Stockholm Prize in Criminology. Dr. Olds obtained his B.A. from Johns Hopkins University and his Ph.D. from Cornell University.

Ellen C. Perrin, M.D., received her medical degree from Case Western Reserve University and also holds a master’s degree in developmental psychology from the University of Rochester. Dr. Perrin was President of the Society of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics in 1997-1998, and was instrumental in the effort to achieve official sub-board status for the subspecialty in 1999. She is currently the Research Director of the Division of Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics at Floating Hospital for Children at Tufts Medical Center and a professor of pediatrics at Tufts Medical School. Her research has focused on improving developmental and behavioral assessment and care in primary care contexts. She has written one book and co-edited a recent textbook of developmental-behavioral pediatrics.

Guillermo (“Willy”) Prado, Ph.D., obtained his doctorate in epidemiology in 2005. He is currently Miller Professor of Public Health Sciences and the Chief of the Division of Prevention Science and Community Health in the Department of Public Health Sciences at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. He is a prevention scientist with extensive experience in health disparities research and prevention intervention science. His program of research has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) since the first year of his doctoral program when he received an R03. Since then, he has been principal investigator of approximately $10 million, mostly from the NIH, and an additional $50 million as senior mentor or co-investigator. Dr. Prado is currently the Director of Training for the University of Miami’s National Cancer Institute–funded South Florida Cancer Health Disparities Center, and Co-Director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse–funded Center for Prevention Implementation Methodology for Drug Abuse and Sexual Risk Behavior (Brown, C.H., PI). He also Co-Chairs the Mentoring and Training Core of this Implementation Science Center. The aim of this latter Center is to facilitate the seamless integration of evidence-based preventive interventions into community practice. His accomplishments in health disparities and prevention science have been recognized by numerous professional organizations, including the Society for Prevention Research, the Society for Research on Adolescence, and the National Hispanic Science Network. In its inaugural class, the Miami Herald selected Dr. Prado as 1 of the Top 20 Business Leaders and Innovators in South Florida under the age of 40. He is currently an Associate Editor for Prevention Science.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×

Ron Prinz, Ph.D., A.B.P.P., is a Carolina Distinguished Professor in Psychology who directs the Parenting & Family Research Center at the University of South Carolina. Dr. Prinz attended University of California, Los Angeles, and University of California, Berkeley, as an undergraduate and received his doctorate in clinical psychology from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. He is lead editor (with Tom Ollendick) of Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review. His research focuses on parenting and family issues, population-based prevention of child abuse, the prevention of childhood behavioral and emotional problems, and treatment of substance abuse issues in families. Dr. Prinz was the lead investigator on the Center for Disease Control and Prevention-sponsored U.S. Triple P System Population Trial and currently directs clinical trials funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the National Institute of Mental Health pertaining to interventions with families. He coordinates the Research Consortium on Children and Families at the University of South Carolina and a National Institutes of Health–supported T32 research training initiative called the Behavioral-Biomedical Interface Program.

Richard Spoth, Ph.D., is the F. Wendell Miller Senior Prevention Scientist and the Director of the Partnerships in Prevention Science Institute at Iowa State University. As the Institute director, Dr. Spoth provides oversight for an interrelated set of projects addressing a range of research questions on prevention program engagement, program effectiveness, culturally competent programming, and dissemination of evidence-based programs through community–university partnerships. These projects are funded primarily by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Among his NIH-funded projects, Dr. Spoth received a MERIT Award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) for a large-scale study evaluating combined family- and school-based interventions called the Capable Families and Youth Project. Another prevention trial, Project Family, is one of ten projects selected for NIDA’s “Preventing Drug Abuse among Children and Adolescents: A Research-based Guide”; one of the programs it evaluates has received recognition from several federal agencies. Work on a dissemination trial called PROSPER (PROmoting School-community-university Partnerships to Enhance Resilience) has received awards from the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the National 4H Council; PROSPER has been approved as both a Blueprints “Promising” and a “Near Top Tier” intervention. Dr. Spoth has served on numerous federally sponsored expert and technical review panels addressing issues in prevention research and research-practice integration, including the Promise Neighborhood Research Consortium. In addition, he has been invited to testify and brief Congress, and to represent the prevention field on panels sponsored by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×

With this work, Dr. Spoth received the Prevention Science Award from the Society for Prevention Research for outstanding contributions to advancing the field of prevention science, as well as the Service to the Society for Prevention Research Award, for leadership on the Task Force on Type 2 translation research.

Kathryn Stack is the Advisor for Evidence-Based Innovation at the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB), helping federal agencies to strengthen their capacity to use and build evidence to improve their effectiveness. From 2005 to July 2013, she was OMB’s Deputy Associate Director for Education, Income Maintenance, and Labor, overseeing budget, policy, legislation, regulations, and management issues concerning the U.S. Departments of Education and Labor, the Social Security Administration, the Food and Nutrition Service of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the Administration on Children and Families within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In recent years, she was instrumental in helping federal agencies design several new grant-making models that allocate funding based on evidence and evaluation quality, and in building consensus across a number of federal agencies for adoption of common evidence guidelines. Prior to becoming division director, she served as an examiner and as Chief of the Education Branch of OMB, and held several management and budget positions at the U.S. Department of Education. She is a graduate of Cornell University and a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration.

Lauren H. Supplee, Ph.D., is the director of the Division of Family Strengthening in the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) for the Administration for Children and Families. This new division within OPRE includes work related to healthy marriage, responsible fatherhood, youth development, teen pregnancy prevention, early childhood home visiting, and domestic violence. Prior to this position her portfolio included projects such as Head Start CARES, a national group-randomized trial of evidence-based social-emotional promotion programs in Head Start classrooms; Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE), a transparent systematic review of the evidence on home visitation programs; Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation (MIHOPE), a congressionally mandated national evaluation of the new Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting program; MIHOPE-Strong Start, an expansion of MIHOPE to examine home visiting and birth outcomes. Dr. Supplee was also a Society for Research in Child Development Policy Fellowship project officer and is currently co-lead of the federal Interagency Workgroup on Research on Evidence-Based Policies and Programs. She received her Ph.D. from Indiana University in educational psychology with a specialization in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
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family-focused early intervention services. Her personal research interests include evidence-based policy, social-emotional development in early childhood, parenting, prevention and intervention programs for children at risk, and implementation research.

Carolyn Webster-Stratton, Ph.D., M.P.H., is Professor Emeritus and Founder of the Parenting Clinic at the University of Washington School of Nursing. She is a licensed clinical psychologist and nurse practitioner, and a leading expert on parenting, family therapy, teacher training in classroom management and methods to reduce conduct problems and promote young children’s social and emotional competence at home and at school. She has published books and training manuals for mental health professionals, parents, and children and numerous scientific articles concerning prevention and treatment programs for children with oppositional defiant disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. She has had extensive clinical and research experience in helping teachers and families reduce conduct disorders and strengthen social and emotional competence and school readiness skills. She has produced The Incredible Years® Parents, Teachers and Children training series, which consists of more than 36 training DVDs to be used with teachers, parents, and children. She received the 1997 National Mental Health Lela Rowland Prevention Award for her interventions with families, the prestigious National Mental Health Research Scientist Award, the 2013 Dale Richmond/Justin Coleman Lectureship Award (American Academy of Pediatrics), and a Doctor Honoris Causa from the Université de Sherbrooke.

Amy M. Wetherby, Ph.D., is a Distinguished Research Professor in the Department of Clinical Sciences and Director of the Autism Institute in the College of Medicine at Florida State University (FSU). She has more than 30 years of clinical experience and is a Fellow of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. She served on the National Academy of Sciences Committee for Educational Interventions for Children with Autism and is the Executive Director of the FSU Center for Autism and Related Disabilities. She also served on the DSM-5 Neurodevelopmental Workgroup of the American Psychiatric Association which is revising the diagnostic criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), learning disorders, intellectual disabilities, communication disorders, and other developmental disorders. Dr. Wetherby is the Project Director of the FIRST WORDS Project, a longitudinal research investigation on early detection of ASD, funded by the U.S. Department of Education (DOE), National Institutes of Health, and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Wetherby is also the principal investigator of two randomized controlled treatment trials, one for toddlers with ASD funded by the National Institute of Mental Health

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×

and one for school-age children funded by DOE, Institute of Education Sciences. She is the principal investigator at FSU for one of five collaborative research entities that form the Autism Intervention Research Network on Behavior Health funded by the Health Resources and Services Administration. She has developed and implemented screening tools for autism and communication disorders in large population-based samples of children 6 to 24 months of age. Dr. Wetherby is co-developer of Autism Navigator®, an innovative collection of tools and courses designed to bridge the gap between science and community practice using a highly interactive Web platform with extensive video footage to illustrate effective evidence-based practice. Her research focus is to study the use of innovative technology to build the capacity of the health care system to improve early detection of autism and communication disorders and provide access to cost-efficient prevention and early intervention services that are feasible for far-reaching community implementation.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker Biosketches." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2014. Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18808.
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Over the last three decades, researchers have made remarkable progress in creating and testing family-focused programs aimed at fostering the cognitive, affective, and behavioral health of children. These programs include universal interventions, such as those for expecting or new parents, and workshops for families whose children are entering adolescence, as well as programs targeted to especially challenged parents, such as low-income single teens about to have their first babies, or the parents of children with autism. Some family-focused programs have been shown to foster significantly better outcomes in children, including enhanced educational performance, and reduced rates of teen pregnancy, substance abuse, and child conduct and delinquency, as well as reduced child abuse. The favorable cost-benefit ratios of some of these programs are due, in part, to the multiple and far-ranging effects that family-focused prevention programs targeting children can have. Other family-focused programs have shown success in smaller academic studies but have not been widely applied, or have not worked as effectively or failed when applied to more diverse real-world settings.

Strategies for Scaling Effective Family-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health is the summary of a workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine Forum on Promoting Children's Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health to explore effective preventive interventions for youth that can modify risk and promote protective factors that are linked to mental, emotional, and behavioral health, and how to apply this existing knowledge. Based on the 2009 report Preventing Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Disorders Among Young People, this report considers how to build a stronger research and practice base around the development and implementation of programs, practices, and policies that foster children's health and well-being across the country, while engaging multi-sectorial stakeholders. While research has advanced understanding of risk, promotive, and protective factors in families that influence the health and well-being of youth, a challenge remains to provide family-focused interventions across child and adolescent development at sufficient scale and reach to significantly reduce the incidence and prevalence of negative cognitive, affective, and behavioral outcomes in children and adolescents nationwide, as well as to develop widespread demand for effective programs by end users. This report explores new and innovative ways to broaden the reach and demand for effective programs and to generate alternative paradigms for strengthening families.

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