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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Role and Potential of Communities in Population Health Improvement: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18946.
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THE ROLE and POTENTIAL
of COMMUNITIES
in POPULATION HEALTH
IMPROVEMENT

WORKSHOP SUMMARY

Theresa Wizemann and Darla Thompson, Rapporteurs

Roundtable on Population Health Improvement

Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice

INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE
              OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS

Washington, D.C.

www.nap.edu

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Role and Potential of Communities in Population Health Improvement: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18946.
×

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS    500 Fifth Street, NW    Washington, DC 20001

NOTICE: The workshop that is the subject of this workshop summary was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine.

This activity was supported by contracts between the National Academy of Sciences and The California Endowment (20112338), the California HealthCare Foundation (17102), Health Partners, Health Resources and Services Administration (HHSH25034015T), Kaiser East Bay Community Foundation (20131471), The Kresge Foundation (101288), the Mayo Clinic, Missouri Foundation for Health (12-0879-SOF-12), the National Association of County and City Health Officials (2013-010204), Nemours, New York State Health Foundation (12-01708), Novo Nordisk, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (70555). The views presented in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of the organizations or agencies that provided support for the activity.

International Standard Book Number-13: 978-0-309-31206-6
International Standard Book Number-10: 0-309-31206-X

Additional copies of this workshop summary are available for sale from the National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, NW, Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001; (800) 624-6242 or (202) 334-3313; http://www.nap.edu.

For more information about the Institute of Medicine, visit the IOM home page at: www.iom.edu.

Copyright 2015 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

Printed in the United States of America

The serpent has been a symbol of long life, healing, and knowledge among almost all cultures and religions since the beginning of recorded history. The serpent adopted as a logotype by the Institute of Medicine is a relief carving from ancient Greece, now held by the Staatliche Museen in Berlin.

Suggested citation: IOM (Institute of Medicine). 2015. The role and potential of communities in population health improvement: Workshop summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Role and Potential of Communities in Population Health Improvement: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18946.
×

Knowing is not enough; we must apply.
Willing is not enough; we must do.
”      

                                                —Goethe

image

INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE
              OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

Advising the Nation. Improving Health.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Role and Potential of Communities in Population Health Improvement: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18946.
×

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES

Advisers to the Nation on Science, Engineering, and Medicine

The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. Upon the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone is president of the National Academy of Sciences.

The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. C. D. Mote, Jr., is president of the National Academy of Engineering.

The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, upon its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Victor J. Dzau is president of the Institute of Medicine.

The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone and Dr. C. D. Mote, Jr., are chair and vice chair, respectively, of the National Research Council.

www.national-academies.org

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Role and Potential of Communities in Population Health Improvement: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18946.
×

PLANNING COMMITTEE ON THE ROLE AND POTENTIAL
OF COMMUNITIES IN POPULATION HEALTH1

MARY LOU GOEKE (Chair), Executive Director, United Way of Santa Cruz County

GEORGE R. FLORES, Program Manager, The California Endowment

KATE HESS PACE, Lead Organizer, Center for Health Organizing, PICO National Network

MELISSA A. SIMON, Director of Patient Navigation, Robert Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

JULIE WILLEMS VAN DIJK, Associate Scientist, University of Wisconsin, Population Health Institute

IOM Staff

ALINA B. BACIU, Study Director

COLIN F. FINK, Senior Program Assistant

AMY GELLER, Senior Program Officer

LYLA HERNANDEZ, Senior Program Officer

ANDREW LEMERISE, Research Associate

DARLA THOMPSON, Associate Program Officer (from May 2014)

ROSE MARIE MARTINEZ, Director, Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice

Consultant

THERESA WIZEMANN, Rapporteur

____________

1 Institute of Medicine planning committees are solely responsible for organizing the workshop, identifying topics, and choosing speakers. The responsibility for the published workshop summary rests with the workshop rapporteurs and the institution.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Role and Potential of Communities in Population Health Improvement: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18946.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Role and Potential of Communities in Population Health Improvement: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18946.
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ROUNDTABLE ON POPULATION HEALTH IMPROVEMENT1

GEORGE ISHAM (Co-Chair), Senior Advisor, HealthPartners, Inc., and Senior Fellow, HealthPartners Institute for Education and Research

DAVID A. KINDIG (Co-Chair), Professor Emeritus and Emeritus Vice-Chancellor, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health

TERRY ALLAN, President, National Association of County and City Health Officials, and Health Commissioner, Cuyahoga County Board of Health

CATHERINE BAASE, Chief Health Officer, The Dow Chemical Company

GILLIAN BARCLAY, Vice President, Aetna Foundation

RAYMOND J. BAXTER, Senior Vice President, Community Benefit, Research and Health Policy, and President, Kaiser Foundation International, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Inc.

DEBBIE I. CHANG, Vice President, Policy and Prevention, Nemours

GEORGE R. FLORES, Program Manager, The California Endowment

MARY LOU GOEKE, Executive Director, United Way of Santa Cruz County

MARTHE R. GOLD, Visiting Scholar, New York Academy of Medicine, and Professor, City College of New York

GARTH GRAHAM, President, Aetna Foundation

PEGGY A. HONORÉ, Director, Public Health System, Finance and Quality Program, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

ROBERT HUGHES, President and Chief Executive Officer, Missouri Foundation for Health

ROBERT M. KAPLAN, Chief Science Officer, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

JAMES KNICKMAN, President and Chief Executive Officer, New York State Health Foundation

PAULA LANTZ, Professor and Chair, Department of Health Policy, George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services

MICHELLE LARKIN, Assistant Vice President, Health Group, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

THOMAS A. LAVEIST, Professor and Director, Hopkins for Health Disparities Solutions, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

____________

1 Institute of Medicine forums and roundtables do not issue, review, or approve individual documents. The responsibility for the published workshop summary rests with the workshop rapporteurs and the institution.

Page viii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Role and Potential of Communities in Population Health Improvement: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18946.
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JEFFREY LEVI, Executive Director, Trust for America’s Health

SARAH R. LINDE, Rear Admiral, U.S. Public Health Service, Chief Public Health Officer, Health Resources and Services Administration

SANNE MAGNAN, President and Chief Executive Officer, Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement

PHYLLIS D. MEADOWS, Associate Dean for Practice, Office of Public Health Practice, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, and Senior Fellow, Health Program, Kresge Foundation

JUDITH A. MONROE, Director, Office for State, Tribal, Local, and Territorial Support, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

JOSÉ MONTERO, President, Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, and Director, New Hampshire Division of Public Health Services

MARY PITTMAN, President and Chief Executive Officer, Public Health Institute

PAMELA RUSSO, Senior Program Officer, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

LILA J. FINNEY RUTTEN, Associate Scientific Director, Population Health Science Program, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic

BRIAN SAKURADA, Senior Director, Managed Markets and Integrated Health Systems

MARTIN JOSÉ SEPÚLVEDA, Fellow and Vice President, Health Research, International Business Machines Corporation

ANDREW WEBBER, Chief Executive Officer, Maine Health Management Coalition

IOM Staff

ALINA B. BACIU, Study Director

COLIN F. FINK, Senior Program Assistant

AMY GELLER, Senior Program Officer

LYLA HERNANDEZ, Senior Program Officer

ANDREW LEMERISE, Research Associate

DARLA THOMPSON, Associate Program Officer (from May 2014)

ROSE MARIE MARTINEZ, Director, Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Role and Potential of Communities in Population Health Improvement: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18946.
×

Reviewers

This workshop summary has been reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise, in accordance with procedures approved by the National Research Council’s Report Review Committee. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the institution in making its published workshop summary as sound as possible and to ensure that the workshop summary meets institutional standards for objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the study charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the process. We wish to thank the following individuals for their review of this workshop summary:

Kelly Fischer, Los Angeles County Public Health

Maryjane Puffer, Los Angeles Trust for Children’s Health

Autumn Saxton-Ross, Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies

Albert Terrillion, National Council on Aging

Although the reviewers listed above have provided many constructive comments and suggestions, they did not see the final draft of the workshop summary before its release. The review of this workshop summary was overseen by Georges Benjamin, American Public Health

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Role and Potential of Communities in Population Health Improvement: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18946.
×

Association. Appointed by the Institute of Medicine, he was responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this workshop summary was carried out in accordance with institutional procedures and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsibility for the final content of this workshop summary rests entirely with the rapporteurs and the institution.

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Role and Potential of Communities in Population Health Improvement: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18946.
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Page xiii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Role and Potential of Communities in Population Health Improvement: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18946.
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Abbreviations and Acronyms

BAEHC

Bay Area Environmental Health Collaborative

CDC

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

CoCo

Community Coalition of South Los Angeles

HIA

health impact assessment

IOM

Institute of Medicine

PERE

Program for Environmental and Regional Equity

TRI

toxic release inventory

Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." Institute of Medicine. 2015. The Role and Potential of Communities in Population Health Improvement: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/18946.
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The Role and Potential of Communities in Population Health Improvement is the summary of a workshop held by the Institute of Medicine Roundtable on Population Health Improvement in April 2014 that featured invited speakers from community groups that have taken steps to improve the health of their communities. Speakers from communities across the United States discussed the potential roles of communities for improving population health. The workshop focused on youth organizing, community organizing or other types of community participation, and partnerships between community and institutional actors. This report explores the roles and potential of the community as leaders, partners, and facilitators in transforming the social and environmental conditions that shape health and well-being at the local level.

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