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Suggested Citation:"A. Speakers." National Research Council. 1991. The Future of Statistical Software: Proceedings of a Forum. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1910.
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Appendix A
Speakers

Keith E. Muller

Keith E. Muller is an associate professor of biostatistics at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. He earned B.S. and M.A. degrees in psychology from Bradley University. He subsequently earned a Ph.D. in quantitative psychology and an M.S. in statistics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His enthusiasm for and training in quantitative methods began during his undergraduate years in the late 1960s. Having grown tired of earning money doing complex ANOVAs on calculators, he took his first computing course, FORTRAN and beginning numerical analysis. This was followed by a two-semester graduate sequence in numerical methods for computers (focusing on linear and nonlinear systems). Other courses followed. As with many middle-aged statisticians, his statistical computing experiences encompass a range of equipment, software, and applications. He is a member of the American Psychological Association, the American Statistical Association, the Psi Chi Psychology Honorary, and the Psychometric Society, and he is an associate review editor for the Journal of the American Statistical Association.

Paul F. Velleman

Paul Velleman teaches statistics at Cornell University, where he chairs the Department of Economic and Social Statistics. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and past chair of the Association's Section on Statistical Computing. Professor Velleman is the developer of Data Desk®, one of the major statistics and graphics programs on the Macintosh. Professor Velleman has published research in modern data analysis methods, graphical data analysis methods, and statistical computing. His book (co-authored with David Hoaglin), ABC's of EDA, made computer implementations of exploratory data analysis methods widely available.

Suggested Citation:"A. Speakers." National Research Council. 1991. The Future of Statistical Software: Proceedings of a Forum. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1910.
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Andrew Kirsch

Andrew Kirsch is a statistical specialist with 3M in St. Paul, Minnesota. He holds an M.S. in statistics from the University of Wisconsin and an M.A. in applied mathematics from the University of Massachusetts. He has worked with 3M plants and laboratories for the past 9 years on a wide variety of products and processes, from electronics to contact lenses. He also has responsibilities in the areas of software, education, supervision, and methods research.

William DuMouchel

William DuMouchel has been chief statistical scientist at the Software Products Division of Bolt Beranek Newman Inc. since 1987. He earned a Ph.D. in statistics from Yale University in 1971. Before coming to BBN Software Products he held faculty appointments at the University of California, Berkeley, University of Michigan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Harvard University. He has been elected a fellow of the American Statistical Association and of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and he is a member of the International Statistical Institute. His research interests include statistical computing, Bayesian statistics and meta-analysis, and environmental and insurance risk assessment.

Daryl Pregibon

Daryl Pregibon is head of the Statistics and Data Analysis Research Department at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, New Jersey. He received his Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Toronto in 1979. Dr. Pregibon spent one postdoctoral year at Princeton University and another at the University of Washington. He has been at AT&T Bell Laboratories for the past 9 years. Dr. Pregibon has been involved in the development of knowledge-based software for statistical data analysis since his coming to Bell Laboratories. He is a co-developer, with W.A. Gale, of the first prototype expert system for regression analysis, REX. He has contributed substantially to the theory, application, and computational aspects of generalized linear models. His current interests concern interactive statistical graphics and tree-based modeling. Dr. Pregibon is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and a member of the International Statistical Institute.

Suggested Citation:"A. Speakers." National Research Council. 1991. The Future of Statistical Software: Proceedings of a Forum. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1910.
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Page75
Suggested Citation:"A. Speakers." National Research Council. 1991. The Future of Statistical Software: Proceedings of a Forum. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/1910.
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Page76
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This book presents guidelines for the development and evaluation of statistical software designed to ensure minimum acceptable statistical functionality as well as ease of interpretation and use. It consists of the proceedings of a forum that focused on three qualities of statistical software: richness—the availability of layers of output sophistication, guidance—how the package helps a user do an analysis and do it well, and exactness—determining if the output is "correct" and when and how to warn of potential problems.

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