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Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation (2015)

Chapter:Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
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Appendix A

Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

LaRue Allen, Ph.D. (Chair), is Raymond and Rosalee Weiss Professor of Applied Psychology and Chair of the Department of Applied Psychology in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University. She also directs the Child and Family Policy Center, which focuses on bringing social science knowledge to policy makers and practitioners concerned with children and their families. Her research interests include urban preschool, adolescent and emerging adult development; impact of social, cultural, and ecological factors on human development; issues in cross-cultural and cross-national research methods and design; civic engagement; and financial literacy. Dr. Allen was visiting professor at the Centre de Recherche de l’Education Spécialisée et de l’Adaptation Scolaire in Paris, France, where she collaborates on research on preventing school failure through interventions with young children, their families, and the community structures that support them. She was also a Visiting Scholar at the American University of Paris from 2006 to 2010. She was a member of the 1991 National Research Council committee that produced the report Work and Family: Policies for a Changing Work Force. Dr. Allen received her Ph.D. in Clinical/Community/Developmental Psychology from Yale University and her A.B. from Harvard University.

W. Thomas Boyce, M.D., is Distinguished Professor in the Division of Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Before moving to UCSF in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
×

2013, he was the Sunny Hill Health Centre/BC Leadership Chair in Child Development at the University of British Columbia. As a social epidemiologist and a developmental-behavioral pediatrician, his research addresses how genetic, neural, and psychosocial processes work together to produce inequalities in childhood health and disease across different socioeconomic groups. His work has shown how psychological stress and neurobiological reactivity to aversive social contexts interact to produce disorders of both physical and mental health in populations of children. He serves as co-director of the Experience-Based Brain and Biological Development Program of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and is a past member of Harvard University’s National Scientific Council on the Developing Child. Dr. Boyce was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 2011 and currently serves on the IOM–National Research Council Board on Children, Youth, and Families. Dr. Boyce received his M.D. from Baylor College of Medicine and completed pediatric residency training at UCSF. Following residency, he was named a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholar at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Joshua L. Brown, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Applied Developmental Psychology in the Department of Psychology at Fordham University. His research focuses on the design and evaluation of programs to support urban public schools and teachers in promoting the social-emotional and academic development of children from diverse backgrounds and socioeconomic conditions. His research is conducted in collaboration with urban school districts and community-based partners and has been supported by grants from federal and private organizations including the National Institute of Mental Health, the Institute of Education Sciences, and the William T. Grant Foundation. His current research projects involve (1) a long-term follow-up study of an elementary school social-emotional learning intervention on youth health risk behaviors across middle and high school transitions; (2) conducting among the first federally funded randomized controlled trials of a mindfulness-based professional development program designed specifically for public school teachers; and (3) the development and evaluation of a school-based social-emotional learning and literacy intervention integrated with an intensive video-based teacher coaching model. Dr. Brown has served as a principal scientific review panel member for the Institute of Education sciences and an invited panel reviewer for the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities. He has been a recipient of a William T. Grant Scholars Award and is currently a senior representative on the Steering Committee for the University-Based Child and Family Policy Consortium. Dr. Brown earned his doctorate in human development from Teachers College, Columbia University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
×

Douglas H. Clements, Ph.D., is a Kennedy Endowed Chair in Early Childhood Learning, Professor, and Executive Director of the Marsico Institute of Early Learning and Literacy at University of Denver’s Morgridge College of Education. Previously, Dr. Clements worked as a kindergarten teacher for 5 years and a preschool teacher for 1 year, and he has since conducted research and published widely in the areas of (1) the learning and teaching of early mathematics; (2) computer applications in mathematics education; (3) creating, using, and evaluating a research-based curriculum and in taking successful curricula to scale using technologies and learning trajectories; and (4) development and evaluation of innovative assessments of mathematics achievement, as well as mathematics teaching. Prior to his appointment at the University of Denver, Dr. Clements was a State University of New York (SUNY) Distinguished Professor at the University of Buffalo. He was a member of President Bush’s National Math Advisory Panel and served on the National Research Council Committee on Early Childhood Mathematics. Dr. Clements received his Ph.D. in elementary education from SUNY at Buffalo.

Fabienne Doucet, Ph.D., is Associate Professor and Content Area Director of the Program in Early Childhood Education in the Department of Teaching and Learning at the New York University (NYU) Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. Her research program addresses how immigrant and U.S.-born children of color and their families navigate education in the United States. A critical ethnographer, Dr. Doucet studies how taken-for-granted beliefs, practices, and values in the U.S. educational system position children and families who are linguistically, culturally, and socioeconomically diverse at a disadvantage, and her work seeks active solutions for meeting their educational needs. Her primary line of inquiry is a critical examination of how family involvement in schools is framed in the United States. This work forcefully argues that traditional constructions of family involvement often obscure and disempower families, particularly those coming from less privileged positions. One overarching goal of this work has been to build a new imagination for family involvement. Dr. Doucet is Chair of the Haiti Working Group at the NYU Steinhardt Institute for Human Development and Social Change and an affiliated faculty member of the NYU Center for Latin American and Caribbean Studies. Dr. Doucet received her Ph.D. in human development and family studies from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Harvard Graduate School of Education with fellowships from the National Science Foundation and the National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
×

John C. Duby, M.D., is Director of Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics and Medical Director of the Family Child Learning Center at Akron Children’s Hospital. He is also Professor of Pediatrics at Northeast Ohio Medical University. Previously, he worked as a general pediatrician in private practice. He is a member of the Sub Board in Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics of the American Board of Pediatrics. He is President-elect of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. Dr. Duby has served in a number of leadership roles, including President of the Ohio Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), President of the Ohio AAP Foundation, and Chair of the AAP Task Force on the Vision of Pediatrics 2020. He is currently Chair of the AAP Mental Health Leadership Work Group. He has led statewide quality improvement initiatives in Ohio focused on early identification and management of emotional, developmental, and behavioral issues in primary care. In 2009, he received the Elizabeth Spencer Ruppert Ohio AAP Outstanding Pediatrician award. In 2011, he was honored as 1 of the 100 Buckeyes You Should Know by the Ohio State University Alumni Association. Dr. Duby received his M.D. from the Ohio State University College of Medicine and completed his pediatric training at Baylor College of Medicine and fellowship in developmental-behavioral pediatrics at Boston University.

David N. Figlio, Ph.D., is the Orrington Lunt Professor of Education and Social Policy and Director of the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University. Dr. Figlio conducts research on a wide range of educational and tax issues from school accountability and standards to welfare policy and policy design. His current research projects involve evaluating the Florida Corporate Tax Credit Scholarships Program, the largest school-voucher program in the United States; conducting a large-scale study of school accountability in Florida; identifying intergenerational effects in health and education; and examining student learning outcomes. Dr. Figlio is also a Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a member of the Executive Board of the National Center for the Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research. Dr. Figlio served as the inaugural Editor of the Association for Education Finance and Policy’s journal, Education Finance and Policy (MIT Press), and currently serves as co-editor of the Journal of Human Resources and Associate Editor of the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, Journal of Urban Economics, Education Finance and Policy, and Public Finance Review. He has been part of many national education task forces and panels, such as the National Research Council Committee on Test Design for K-12 Science Achievement, and advised several U.S. states and foreign nations on the design, implementation, and evaluation of educational policies. He also serves as co-director of the National Science Foundation’s network of scholars,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
×

policy makers, and practitioners to make use of linked administrative data to improve education scholarship, policy, and practice. Dr. Figlio received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin.

Jana Fleming, J.D., Ph.D., has extensive experience evaluating the quality of early education programs and services, training teachers on best practices in early education, studying means of financing services for children and families, and advising policy makers on strategies to improve educational and social services for young children and their families. In early 2015 she moved to Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, to direct the Salama bint Hamdan Al Nahyan Foundation’s Center of Excellence in Early Childhood Development. Prior to assuming this position, she served as Director of the Herr Research Center for Children and Social Policy at Erikson Institute (Chicago, Illinois) where she directed research, evaluation, and public outreach projects to inform and support effective early childhood public policy development and implementation. While at Erikson, she also directed two professional learning programs aimed at preparing leaders from diverse ethnic and racial backgrounds to work effectively in early childhood policy making and systems building. Prior to joining Erikson, Dr. Fleming was at the City Colleges of Chicago, the largest urban community college system in the United States, where she launched and directed a system-wide effort to overhaul its child development degree programs and earn national accreditation, as well as transform five childcare centers into functioning laboratory preschools. Dr. Fleming worked for 16 years at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute (FPG) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. At FPG, she served as a research investigator managing large-scale research and evaluation projects, as well as co-director of the Early Childhood Leadership Development Program, providing graduate-level education and training for early childhood professionals in health services, education, social welfare, childcare, and family protective services. She also has experience as a policy analyst in state government and was a consultant to the Chicago-based Joyce Foundation directing its grant making in early education. Dr. Fleming holds a Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a law degree from Duke University, and a B.A. degree from Cornell University.

Lisa Guernsey, M.A., is Director of the Early Education Initiative and Director of the Learning Technologies Project at New America, a nonpartisan think tank in Washington, DC, where she focuses on how to scale up high-quality learning environments for young children, birth through age 8. She is the lead author of The Next Social Contract for the Primary Years of Education (New America, 2010) and Watching Teachers Work: Using Observation Tools to Promote Effective Teaching in the Early Years and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
×

Early Grades (New America, 2011). A journalist by training, Ms. Guernsey has been a technology and education writer at the New York Times and the Chronicle of Higher Education and has written about technology, education, and social science issues for a wide variety of publications, including Newsweek, Time.com, Consumer Reports, Ladies Home Journal, The Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, The American Prospect, and others. She contributes to the Ed Central blog, which includes a subsection built on the previously named Early Ed Watch focusing on policy and research in early learning, and she writes regularly for Slate magazine’s Future Tense blog. Ms. Guernsey’s most recent book is Screen Time: How Electronic Media—From Baby Videos to Educational Software—Affects Your Young Child (Basic Books, 2012). The book is an update to Into the Minds of Babes: How Screen Time Affects Children from Birth to Age 5, published in 2007. She contributed a chapter to Mobile Technology for Children: Designing for Interaction and Learning (Morgan Kaufman, 2009) and wrote one of the first Internet handbooks focused on education: College.Edu: A Guide for the Cyber-Savvy Student (1997-2010). She received her M.A. in English/American studies from the University of Virginia.

Ron Haskins, Ph.D., is a Senior Fellow in Economic Studies at the Brookings Institution, where he co-directs both the Center on Children and Families and the Budgeting for National Priorities Project. He is also a senior consultant at the Annie E. Casey Foundation. He is the author of Work Over Welfare: The Inside Story of the 1996 Welfare Reform Law (2006), co-author of Creating an Opportunity Society (2009), and Senior Editor of The Future of Children. In 2002 he was the Senior Advisor to the President for Welfare Policy at the White House. Previously, he spent 14 years on the staff of the House Ways and Means Human Resources Subcommittee, serving as the subcommittee’s Staff Director after Republicans took control of the House in 1994. In 1997, Dr. Haskins was selected by the National Journal as 1 of the 100 most influential people in the federal government. He holds a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Jacqueline Jones, Ph.D., is the President and CEO of the Foundation for Child Development. During the first term of the Obama Administration she served as Senior Advisor on Early Learning to Secretary of Education Arne Duncan and as the country’s first Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy and Early Learning in the U.S. Department of Education. Prior to federal service Dr. Jones was the Assistant Commissioner for the Division of Early Childhood Education in the New Jersey State Department of Education. For over 15 years she served as a Senior Research Scientist at the Educational Testing Service in Princeton, New Jersey. Dr. Jones has been a faculty member at the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
×

City University of New York and a visiting faculty member at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. She received both M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Northwestern University.

Marjorie Kostelnik, Ph.D., is Dean of the College of Education and Human Sciences at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln (UNL). She came to UNL in 2000 as Dean of the College of Human Resources and Family Sciences. In 2004, Human Resources and Family Sciences partnered with Teachers College to become the College of Education and Human Sciences. Receiving a bachelor of science degree in child development from the University of Pittsburgh, Dr. Kostelnik began her career working with Head Start before receiving her master’s and doctoral degrees in human development and family studies from the Pennsylvania State University. She was on faculty at Michigan State University for 22 years, serving first as program supervisor of the Child Development Laboratories and then as chair of the Department of Family and Child Ecology. During her time in Michigan, she worked with educators in more than 100 programs inside and outside the United States designing developmentally appropriate curricula, enhancing children’s school readiness, and working with teachers to develop positive child guidance strategies. An author of 18 books, Dr. Kostelnik has also taught a variety of classes at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, and her research focuses on early childhood education and community coalition building. She currently serves on the Lincoln Public Schools Community Learning Centers Advisory Board (focused on before and after-school education), the Malaika Foundation Board (focused on global education), and the Dimensions Foundation Board (focused on nature education). Nationally, Dr. Kostelnik has served as vice president of the National Association for the Education of Young Children, treasurer and board of directors member for the Board on Human Sciences, and chair for the Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance Cabinet, a consortium of universities engaged in distance education. Most recently, she was awarded the Nebraska Association for the Education of Young Children Outstanding Service to Children award.

Nonie K. Lesaux, Ph.D., is Juliana W. and William Foss Thompson Professor of Education and Society at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where she leads a research program that focuses on increasing opportunities to learn for students from diverse linguistic, cultural, and economic backgrounds. Dr. Lesaux’s research and teaching focus primarily on the cognitive and linguistic factors that enable children and adolescents to read effectively. Her research has included longitudinal studies investigating reading and language development among English language learners as well as experimental evaluations of academic vocabulary instruction. She

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
×

is currently a principal investigator of a longitudinal study investigating the interrelated dimensions of linguistically diverse children’s cognitive, socioemotional, and literacy development, and co-directs a project focused on building capacity in the early education workforce. Dr. Lesaux authored a state-level literacy report which forms the basis for a Third Grade Reading Proficiency bill passed in the Massachusetts House of Representatives. The legislation established an Early Literacy Expert Panel, which Dr. Lesaux co-chairs, charged with developing new policies and policy-based initiatives in a number of domains that influence children’s early literacy development. From 2002 to 2006, Dr. Lesaux was senior research associate of the National Literacy Panel on Language Minority Youth and from 2007 to 2009, she was a member of the Reading First Advisory Committee for the Secretary of Education in the U.S. Department of Education. Dr. Lesaux’s scholarship has resulted in two prestigious early career awards—the William T. Grant Foundation Faculty Scholars Award and a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers from the U.S. government.

Ellen M. Markman, Ph.D., is Senior Associate Dean for the Social Sciences and the Lewis M. Terman Professor in the Department of Psychology at Stanford University. She was on the faculty at the University of Illinois before joining the Stanford faculty in 1975. Dr. Markman was Chair of the Department of Psychology from 1994 to 1997 and served as Cognizant Dean for the Social Sciences from 1998 to 2000. In 2003 she was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, in 2004 she was awarded the American Psychological Association’s Mentoring Award, in 2011 she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences, and in 2013 she was awarded the American Psychological Society’s William James Lifetime Achievement Award for Basic Research. Dr. Markman’s research has covered a range of issues in cognitive development including work on comprehension monitoring, logical reasoning, and early theory of mind development. Much of her work has addressed questions of the relationship between language and thought in children focusing on categorization, inductive reasoning, and word learning. One current research project aims to lay the groundwork for a preschool curriculum on nutrition. Dr. Markman received her Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the University of Pennsylvania.

Rollanda E. O’Connor, Ph.D., is Professor and holds the Eady/Hendrick Endowed Chair in Learning Disabilities in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Riverside. Her research focuses on increasing the responsiveness of children to reading interventions in grades K-4, including the effects of tier 2 intervention for English learners across their first 5 years of reading development. She currently leads

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
×

a research team to develop interventions to improve academic vocabulary and reading comprehension of students with disabilities. A former editor of the American Educational Research Journal and President of the Division for Learning Disabilities of the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), Dr. O’Connor was awarded the Jeanette E. Fleischner Career Leadership Award from the CEC in 2015 to recognize her lifelong contributions to the field of learning disabilities. Her research has been funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs and the Institute of Education Sciences. Dr. O’Connor received her Ph.D. in education, special education, and reading from the University of Washington.

Cheryl Polk, Ph.D., is President of the HighScope Educational Research Foundation. Dr. Polk previously served as the Executive Director of the Lisa and John Pritzker Family Fund. She is a noted leader in the child and family services field with a wealth of experience as a clinical psychologist, academic, and civic volunteer. She has worked closely with children and families to promote healthy child development for more than 25 years. Through her leadership at the Mimi and Peter Haas Fund and as Commissioner of the San Francisco Children and Families Commission, Dr. Polk has led major support for early childhood programs. She served as President of the Board of Directors of Zero to Three: National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families and has been a board member of that organization for more than 10 years. Dr. Polk has received many citations, recognitions, and awards, including the prestigious National Leadership Fellowship from the Kellogg Foundation, as well as being a Salzburg Fellow for Early Childhood Development. She was named San Francisco Outstanding Advocate for Children in 2003 and received the Shining Star Award for Leadership and Dedication to the Children of San Francisco in 2000. She received her Ph.D. in psychology from the Alliant International University-San Francisco Bay.

P. Fred Storti, Ed.S., is the recently retired Executive Director of the Minnesota Elementary School Principals’ Association in St. Paul, Minnesota. Prior to assuming this position of statewide and national advocacy, Mr. Storti gained 27 years of experience as a principal/superintendent in Minnesota urban, suburban, and rural schools. In his broad stewardship for children and elementary and middle-level principals, Mr. Storti served on the Alliance for Student Achievement, the P-20 Education Committee, the National Association of Elementary School Principals’ (NAESP’s) Pre K-3 Task Force, and the Ready 4K Board, and convened the Minnesota PreK-3 Summit. He also served as the Chair of the NAESP Executive Directors for 4 years. Mr. Storti received his M.S. and educational specialist degrees from Winona State University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
×

Ross A. Thompson, Ph.D., is Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Davis. Dr. Thompson’s research focuses on early parent–child relationships, the development of emotion understanding and emotion regulation, conscience development, and the growth of prosocial motivation in young children. He also studies the applications of developmental research to public policy concerns, including school readiness and its development, early childhood investments, and early mental health. Dr. Thompson received the Ann Brown Award for Excellence in Developmental Research in 2007, and the University of California, Davis, Distinguished Scholarly Public Service Award in 2011. He was a member of the 2000 Board on Children, Youth, and Families committee that produced the report From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development. He is a member of the Board of Directors of Zero to Three, and the Scientific Advisory Board of the National Institute for Early Education Research. His books include Preventing Child Maltreatment Through Social Support: A Critical Analysis (Sage, 1995), The Postdivorce Family: Children, Families, and Society (co-edited with Paul Amato) (Sage, 1999), Toward a Child-Centered, Neighborhood-Based Child Protection (co-edited with Gary Melton and Mark Small) (Praeger, 2002), and Socioemotional Development (University of Nebraska Press, 1990). Dr. Thompson received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Michigan.

Albert Wat, M.A., is a Senior Policy Analyst in the Education Division of the National Governors Association. Mr. Wat provides state policy makers with analyses and information on promising practices and the latest research in early childhood education policy, from birth through third grade. His work focuses on preschool education systems and alignment of early childhood and early elementary practices and policies, including standards, assessments, and data systems. Mr. Wat’s previous experience includes Research Manager, Senior Research Associate, and State Policy Analyst for Pre-K Now, a project of The Pew Charitable Trusts’ Pew Center on the States. He served on the board of directors of Great Start DC and on the board of advisors for the Student Coalition for Action on Literacy Education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His publications include co-author of A Governor’s Guide to Early Literacy: Getting All Students Reading by Third Grade (National Governors Association, 2013); Governor’s Role in Aligning Early Education and K-12 Reforms: Challenges, Opportunities, and Benefits for Children (National Governors Association, 2012); Transforming Public Education: Pathway to a Pre-K-12 Future (Pew Center on the States, 2011); Why Pre-K for All (Phi Delta Kappan, 2010); The Case for Pre-K in Education Reform: A Summary of Program Evaluation Findings (Pew Center on the States, 2010); Beyond the School Yard: Pre-K Collaborations with Community-Based Partners (Pew

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
×

Center on the States, 2009); and Pre-K Pinch: Early Education and the Middle Class (Pre-K Now, 2008). Mr. Wat received his M.A. in education policy from George Washington University and an M.A. in education, with a focus in social sciences in education, from Stanford University.

PROJECT STAFF

Bridget B. Kelly, M.D., Ph.D., is a Senior Program Officer with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families and Board on Global Health and works on a range of topics in health and education. In addition to serving as the study director for the Committee on the Science of Children Birth to Age 8: Deepening and Broadening the Foundation for Success, she is also director of the Collaborative on Global Chronic Disease Prevention and Control and a co-organizer of the annual Public Health Case Challenge for university student teams in the Washington, DC, area. Most recently she was the study co-director for the Evaluation of PEPFAR, an evaluation of U.S. global HIV/AIDS programs, and the project co-director for the workshop Evaluation Design for Complex Global Initiatives. Previously she was the study director for the report Promoting Cardiovascular Health in the Developing World, and a series of related follow-up activities on global chronic diseases, including the workshop Country-Level Decision Making for Control of Chronic Diseases. She has also worked for projects on strengthening the use of economic evidence to inform interventions for children and families; prevention of mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders among children, youth, and young adults; and depression, parenting, and child development. She was a 2007 Christine Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Graduate Fellow at the National Academies. She holds both an M.D. and a Ph.D. in neurobiology, which she completed through the Medical Scientist Training Program at Duke University. She received her B.A. in biology and neuroscience from Williams College, where she was also the recipient of the Hutchinson Fellowship in fine arts. In addition to her background in science and health, she is a dancer and choreographer with many years of experience in grassroots arts administration and production.

Sheila A. Moats is a program officer with the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council’s Board on Children, Youth, and Families (BCYF). She has been on the National Academies’ staff for 13 years and has worked on studies for both BCYF and the Food and Nutrition Board. In addition to her work with the Committee on the Science of Children Birth to Age 8: Deepening and Broadening the Foundation for Success, Ms. Moats is working with the Committee on Fostering School Success for English Learners: Toward New Directions in Policy, Practice, and Research. She has been the project director for several workshops, most recently Nutrition

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
×

Education in the K-12 Curriculum: The Role of National Standards and An Update on Research Issues in the Assessment of Birth Settings. She has assisted with overseeing numerous consensus studies, including School Meals: Building Blocks for Healthy Children and Child and Adult Food Program: Aligning Dietary Guidance for All. Prior to joining the National Academies, she worked for the American Diabetes Association and the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. She received a B.S. in nutrition science from Pennsylvania State University.

Wendy E. Keenan is a Program Associate for the Board on Children, Youth, and Families at the Institute of Medicine (IOM). She helps organize planning meetings and workshops that cover current issues related to children, youth, and families, and provides administrative and research support to the Board’s various program committees. Ms. Keenan has been on the National Academies’ staff for 15 years and has worked on studies for both the IOM and the National Research Council (NRC). As a senior program assistant, she worked with the NRC’s Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences. Prior to joining the National Academies, she taught English as a second language for Washington, DC, public schools. She received a B.A. in sociology from Pennsylvania State University and took graduate courses in social and public policy at Georgetown University.

Sarah M. Tracey, M.A., joined the Board on Children, Youth, and Families in September 2013. She currently provides research support to the Committee on the Science of Children Birth to Age 8, the Committee on Supporting Parents of Young Children, and the Forum on Investing in Young Children Globally. Prior to joining the National Academies, Ms. Tracey taught academic and survival English courses to adults in Portland, Oregon. In 2010-2011, she assisted the Haiti Working Group at New York University’s Institute of Human Development and Social Change (IHDSC) on research projects and grant proposals. In this role, she also helped plan the IHDSC’s 2010 conference on children, families, and disasters in Haiti. Outside of her work at the IHDSC, Ms. Tracey assisted with communication efforts for the nonprofit Partners for a Bright and Healthy Haiti. In 2006-2007, Ms. Tracey taught the English language arts program for grades 3 through 8 at Southwest School in La Esperanza, Honduras. Ms. Tracey received her M.A. in international education from New York University in 2011, and her B.A. in English literature from the University of Washington in 2004.

Allison L. Berger is a Senior Program Assistant for the Board on Children, Youth, and Families and the Food and Nutrition Board at the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academies. She currently provides administrative and meeting planning support for the Committee on the Science

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
×

of Children Birth to Age 8: Deepening and Broadening the Foundation for Success, and the Committee on a Framework for Assessing the Health, Environmental, and Social Effects of the Food System. Ms. Berger joined the IOM staff in 2002 and has provided assistance on various consensus studies and workshops during her tenure. Most recently, she provided support for the IOM Committee on Physical Activity and Physical Education in the School Environment, the Committee on National Nutrition Education Curriculum Standards: A Workshop, and the Committee on Fitness Measures and Health Outcomes in Youth, just to name a few. She also served as the administrative assistant for the IOM Board on Global Health. Prior to joining the IOM, Ms. Berger served as administrative assistant at the American Psychological Association, where she worked on programs that promote psychological science in the academic and scientific arenas. She is currently pursuing a professional certification in meeting and convention planning.

Kimber Bogard, Ph.D., is the Director of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families at the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council of the National Academies. In this role, she directs a range of activities that address emerging and critical issues in the lives of children, youth, and families. Recently released reports include The Cost of Inaction for Young Children Globally; Considerations in Applying Benefit-Cost Analysis to Preventive Interventions for Children, Youth, and Families; Sports-Related Concussions in Youth: Improving the Science, Changing the Culture; Confronting Commercial Sexual Exploitation and Sex Trafficking of Minors in the United States; New Directions for Research on Child Abuse and Neglect; and Investing in the Health and Well-Being of Young Adults. She was previously the Associate Director of the Institute of Human Development and Social Change at New York University where she managed a portfolio of domestic and international grants and contracts that examined child development within a changing global context. A developmental psychologist by training, Kimber has worked with numerous organizations that support children’s cognitive, affective, and behavioral development in early childhood education through the high school years, including the Foundation for Child Development, W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the Center for Children’s Initiatives, and Partners for a Bright and Healthy Haiti. Kimber often speaks to various audiences about child development in the context of families and schools, with a keen focus on how policies influence developmental, educational, and health trajectories. In 2006, she received her Ph.D. from Fordham University in applied developmental psychology, and she also holds a master’s degree from Columbia University-Teachers College where she studied evidence-informed risk and prevention strategies for children, youth, and families.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biosketches of Committee Members and Staff." Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. 2015. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8: A Unifying Foundation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/19401.
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Next: Appendix B: Public Session Agendas »
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Children are already learning at birth, and they develop and learn at a rapid pace in their early years. This provides a critical foundation for lifelong progress, and the adults who provide for the care and the education of young children bear a great responsibility for their health, development, and learning. Despite the fact that they share the same objective - to nurture young children and secure their future success - the various practitioners who contribute to the care and the education of children from birth through age 8 are not acknowledged as a workforce unified by the common knowledge and competencies needed to do their jobs well.

Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8 explores the science of child development, particularly looking at implications for the professionals who work with children. This report examines the current capacities and practices of the workforce, the settings in which they work, the policies and infrastructure that set qualifications and provide professional learning, and the government agencies and other funders who support and oversee these systems. This book then makes recommendations to improve the quality of professional practice and the practice environment for care and education professionals. These detailed recommendations create a blueprint for action that builds on a unifying foundation of child development and early learning, shared knowledge and competencies for care and education professionals, and principles for effective professional learning.

Young children thrive and learn best when they have secure, positive relationships with adults who are knowledgeable about how to support their development and learning and are responsive to their individual progress. Transforming the Workforce for Children Birth Through Age 8 offers guidance on system changes to improve the quality of professional practice, specific actions to improve professional learning systems and workforce development, and research to continue to build the knowledge base in ways that will directly advance and inform future actions. The recommendations of this book provide an opportunity to improve the quality of the care and the education that children receive, and ultimately improve outcomes for children.

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