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Suggested Citation:"ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
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Acronyms and Abbreviations


AABB–

American Association of Blood Banks

ACIP–

Immunization Practices Advisory Committee

AFIP–

Armed Forces Institute of Pathology

AIDS–

acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

ARC–

American Red Cross

ASM–

American Society for Microbiology

ATLL–

adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma

AZT–

azidothymidine


BCG–

bacille Calmette-Guerin

BRDPI–

Biomedical Research and Development Price Index

BSE–

bovine spongiform encephalopathy


CDC–

Centers for Disease Control

CEN–

Community Epidemiology and Health Management Network

CERTC–

Clinical Epidemiology Research and Training Center

CEU–

Clinical Epidemiology Unit

CIN–

cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

CMV–

cytomegalovirus

CSF–

cerebrospinal fluid


DBCP–

1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane

DDT–

1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane; chlorophenothane

DHF/DSS–

dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome

DNA–

deoxyribonucleic acid

DoD–

Department of Defense

DOT–

directly observed therapy


EIS–

Epidemic Intelligence Service

EPA–

Environmental Protection Agency

Suggested Citation:"ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×

FCCSET–

Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology

FDA–

Food and Drug Administration

FETP–

Field Epidemiology Training Program

FIFRA–

Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act

FWS–

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service


GMI–

Gorgas Memorial Institute

GML–

Gorgas Memorial Laboratory


HAM/TSP–

HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis

HBV–

hepatitis B virus

HFRS–

hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome

HIV–

human immunodeficiency virus

HPV–

human papillomavirus

HSV–

herpes simplex virus

HTLV–

human T-cell leukemia virus, human T-lymphotropic virus


IADB–

InterAmerican Development Bank

ICAR–

International Collaboration in AIDS Research

ICDDR, B–

International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh

ICIDR–

International Collaboration in Infectious Disease Research

ICMRT–

International Centers for Medical Research and Training

ICTDR–

International Centers for Tropical Disease Research

IHPP–

International Health Policy Program

INCIDR–

Intramural NIAID Center for International Disease Research

INCLEN–

International Clinical Epidemiology Network

IOM–

Institute of Medicine


MAP–

modified atmosphere packaging

MARU–

Middle America Research Unit

MDRTB–

multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

MIC–

minimum inhibitory concentration

MMR–

measles-mumps-rubella (vaccine)

MRSA–

methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus


NAMRU–

U.S. Navy Medical Research Unit

NCID–

National Center for Infectious Diseases

NCVDG–

National Cooperative Vaccine Development Group

NEB–

National Epidemiology Boards

NETSS–

National Electronic Telecommunications System for Surveillance

NHSC–

National Health Service Corps

NIAID–

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

NIH–

National Institutes of Health

NNDSS–

National Notifiable Disease Surveillance System

NNISS–

National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System


PAHO–

Pan American Health Organization

PCR–

polymerase chain reaction

Suggested Citation:"ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×

PHS–

U.S. Public Health Service


RFP–

request for proposal

RNA–

ribonucleic acid


SIV–

simian immunodeficiency virus

STD–

sexually transmitted disease


TB–

tuberculosis

TDR–

WHO Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases

TDRU–

Tropical Disease Research Unit

TMRC–

Tropical Medicine Research Center


USAID–

U.S. Agency for International Development

USAMRIID–

U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

USDA–

U.S. Department of Agriculture

UTI–

urinary tract infection


VDP–

WHO Vaccine Development Programme

VRDB–

Vaccine Research and Development Branch


WHO–

World Health Organization


YARU–

Yale Arbovirus Research Unit

Suggested Citation:"ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×
Page280
Suggested Citation:"ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×
Page281
Suggested Citation:"ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×
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Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States Get This Book
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The emergence of HIV disease and AIDS, the reemergence of tuberculosis, and the increased opportunity for disease spread through international travel demonstrate the critical importance of global vigilance for infectious diseases.

This volume highlights risk factors for the emergence of microbial threats to health, warns against complacency in public health, and promotes early prevention as a cost-effective and crucial strategy for maintaining public health in the United States and worldwide.

The volume identifies infectious disease threats posed by bacteria and viruses, as well as protozoans, helminths, and fungi. Rich in information, it includes a historical perspective on infectious disease, with focuses on Lyme disease, peptic ulcer, malaria, dengue, and recent increases in tuberculosis.

The panel discusses how "new" diseases arise and how "old" ones resurge and considers the roles of human demographics and behavior, technology and industry, economic development and land use, international travel and commerce, microbial adaptation and change, and breakdown of public health measures in changing patterns of infectious disease.

Also included are discussions and recommendations on disease surveillance; vaccine, drug, and pesticide development; vector control; public education and behavioral change; research and training; and strengthening of the U.S. public health system.

This volume will be of immediate interest to scientists specializing in all areas of infectious diseases and microbiology, healthy policy specialists, public health officials, physicians, and medical faculty and students, as well as anyone interested in how their health can be threatened by infectious diseases.

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