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Suggested Citation:"A TASK FORCES." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
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A
Task Forces

At its first meeting, the Committee on Emerging Microbial Threats to Health decided to form four task forces to obtain input from the scientific community at large. Each task force (with the exception of Task Force 4) was composed of both committee and noncommittee members and a rapporteur. Task Forces 1 through 3 dealt with specific categories of organisms; Task Force 4 examined policy options that the committee might wish to consider in developing its recommendations. It was later decided to establish a fifth task force to refine the recommendations drafted by the full committee at its third meeting in January 1992. In the lists below, committee members are designated by an asterisk.

TASK FORCE 1

Bacteria, Rickettsiae, and Chlamydiae

Task Force 1 met in Washington, D.C. on May 20-21, 1991, with the following participants:

BARRY R. BLOOM,* Department of Microbiology and Immunology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University

ROBERT L. BUCHANAN,* Microbial Food Safety Research Unit, Agricultural Research Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Eastern Regional Research Center

Suggested Citation:"A TASK FORCES." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×

J. THOMAS GRAYSTON, Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington

GEORGE A. JACOBY, JR., Infectious Disease Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital

GERALD L. MANDELL, (Chair),* Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Virginia

WILLIAM A. PETRI, JR. (Rapporteur), Medicine and Microbiology, Divisions of Infectious Diseases and Geographic Medicine, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center

P. FREDERICK SPARLING,* Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina School of Medicine

ANDREW SPIELMAN,* Department of Tropical Public Health, Harvard School of Public Health

DAVID H. WALKER, Department of Pathology, University of Texas Medical Branch

RICHARD P. WENZEL, Department of Clinical Epidemiology, University of Iowa Hospital

TASK FORCE 2

Viruses

Task Force 2 met in Washington, D.C., on May 16-17, 1991, with the following participants:

BRUCE F. ELDRIDGE, University of California Mosquito Research Program, Department of Entomology, University of California at Davis

PATRICIA N. FULTZ,* Department of Microbiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham

DUANE J. GUBLER, Vector-Borne Infectious Diseases Division, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control

JAMES L. HARDY, School of Public Health, University of California at Berkeley

FREDERICK G. HAYDEN, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Virginia Hospital

JOHN J. HOLLAND,* Department of Biology and Institute for Molecular Biology, University of California at San Diego

RICHARD T. JOHNSON, Department of Neurology, Microbiology, and Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

EDWIN D. KILBOURNE,* Department of Microbiology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine

STEPHEN S. MORSE (Chair),* Rockefeller University

Suggested Citation:"A TASK FORCES." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×

FREDERICK A. MURPHY, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California at Davis

THOMAS W. SCOTT (Rapporteur), Department of Entomology, University of Maryland at College Park

ALEXIS SHELOKOV,* Salk Institute, Government Services Division

TASK FORCE 3

Protozoans, Helminths, and Fungi

Task Force 3 met in Washington, D.C., on May 8, 1991, with the following participants:

RONALD E. BLANTON (Rapporteur), Division of Geographic Medicine, Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, School of Medicine

CARLOS C. CAMPBELL, Malaria Branch, Parasitic Diseases Division, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control

WILLIAM E. DISMUKES, Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, University of Alabama School of Medicine

ADEL A. F. MAHMOUD (Chair),* Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals of Cleveland

ROSEMARY SOAVE, Division of Infectious Diseases, Cornell Medical Center, New York Hospital

ANDREW SPIELMAN,* Department of Tropical Public Health, Harvard School of Public Health

ROBERT B. TESH, Yale Arbovirus Research Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine

TASK FORCE 4

Policy Options

Task Force 4 met in Washington, D.C., on May 13-14, 1991, with the following participants:

BARRY R. BLOOM,* Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University

CIRO A. DE QUADROS, Expanded Programme on Immunization, Pan American Health Organization

WALTER R. DOWDLE, Centers for Disease Control

Suggested Citation:"A TASK FORCES." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×

DEAN T. JAMISON,* Department of Community Health Sciences and Department of Education, University of California at Los Angeles

ADETOKUNBO LUCAS, Department of Population Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health

HARRY M. MEYER, JR., Medical Research Division, American Cyanamid Company

PHILIP K. RUSSELL, (Chair),* School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University

ROBERT E. SHOPE,* Yale Arbovirus Research Unit, Yale University School of Medicine

TASK FORCE 5

Recommendations

Task Force 5 met in Washington, D.C., on February 17, 1992, with the following participants:

JOSHUA LEDERBERG,* Rockefeller University

ADEL A. F. MAHMOUD,* Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals of Cleveland

GERALD L. MANDELL, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Virginia

STEPHEN S. MORSE,* Rockefeller University

PHILIP K. RUSSELL,* School of Hygiene and Public Health, Johns Hopkins University

ROBERT E. SHOPE, (Chair),* Yale Arbovirus Research Unit, Yale University School of Medicine

Suggested Citation:"A TASK FORCES." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
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Page195
Suggested Citation:"A TASK FORCES." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×
Page196
Suggested Citation:"A TASK FORCES." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×
Page197
Suggested Citation:"A TASK FORCES." Institute of Medicine. 1992. Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2008.
×
Page198
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Emerging Infections: Microbial Threats to Health in the United States Get This Book
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The emergence of HIV disease and AIDS, the reemergence of tuberculosis, and the increased opportunity for disease spread through international travel demonstrate the critical importance of global vigilance for infectious diseases.

This volume highlights risk factors for the emergence of microbial threats to health, warns against complacency in public health, and promotes early prevention as a cost-effective and crucial strategy for maintaining public health in the United States and worldwide.

The volume identifies infectious disease threats posed by bacteria and viruses, as well as protozoans, helminths, and fungi. Rich in information, it includes a historical perspective on infectious disease, with focuses on Lyme disease, peptic ulcer, malaria, dengue, and recent increases in tuberculosis.

The panel discusses how "new" diseases arise and how "old" ones resurge and considers the roles of human demographics and behavior, technology and industry, economic development and land use, international travel and commerce, microbial adaptation and change, and breakdown of public health measures in changing patterns of infectious disease.

Also included are discussions and recommendations on disease surveillance; vaccine, drug, and pesticide development; vector control; public education and behavioral change; research and training; and strengthening of the U.S. public health system.

This volume will be of immediate interest to scientists specializing in all areas of infectious diseases and microbiology, healthy policy specialists, public health officials, physicians, and medical faculty and students, as well as anyone interested in how their health can be threatened by infectious diseases.

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