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National Collaboratories: Applying Information Technology for Scientific Research (1993)

Chapter:B WORKSHOP PROGRAMS AND PARTICIPANTS

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Suggested Citation:"B WORKSHOP PROGRAMS AND PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1993. National Collaboratories: Applying Information Technology for Scientific Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2109.
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Appendix B
Workshop Programs and Participants

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY WORKSHOP

Program

Thursday, March 12, 1992

8:30 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

9:00 a.m.

Welcome and Introduction—Alastair Cameron and Bruce Schatz

 

• Background of the collaboratory concept—Need to leverage limited human, financial, and time resources and enable collaboration among scientists

 

• Workshop goals

 

• New ideas for collaboration and the technology that will facilitate collaboration

 

• Priorities and agenda for development of collaboratories

 

• Introductions and personal statements about perspectives on collaboration

9:30 a.m.

Current Issues and Trends in Molecular Biology—David Kingsbury

 

• Communities and problem domains

 

• Types of available knowledge: genes, maps, sequences, literature

 

• Types of available databases: formal, informal, collaborative, laboratory

10:00 a.m.

Molecular Biology and Computer Technology: Lessons Learned from Previous Projects

 

• GenBank/Bionet—Douglas Brutlag

 

• Genome Data Base—Robert Robbins

10:45 a.m.

Break

11:00 a.m.

Current Molecular Biology Collaboratories

 

• Informal Community Systems—Bruce Schatz

 

• Archival Library Systems—Jim Ostell

12:00 noon

Working Lunch with Demonstrations of the Worm Community System and of the National Center for Biotechnology Information Portable Core Library

1:30 p.m.

Current Issues and Trends in Computer Technology: Information Infrastructure

 

• Hardware and Networks—Vint Cerf

Suggested Citation:"B WORKSHOP PROGRAMS AND PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1993. National Collaboratories: Applying Information Technology for Scientific Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2109.
×

 

• Software and Databases—Nat Goodman

2:00 p.m.

Impediments to Adoption of Collaboration Technology—Lee Sproull

 

• Perceived value of technology to the molecular biology community

 

• User readiness and acceptance of the technology

 

• Training for computational biologists

 

• Lack of institutional and information infrastructure

 

• Lack of critical mass of on-line materials

 

• Lack of financial and institutional support for large projects

3:00 p.m.

Brainstorming

 

• How might collaboration aid molecular biology and molecular biologists?

 

• What existing problems in molecular biology might collaboratories solve or ameliorate?

 

• Given sufficient funding, what would you want to build?

 

• Which communities are the most likely to be initial candidates for collaboratories?

 

• How will these collaboratories benefit the scientists who use them?

5:00 p.m.

Reception

6:00 p.m.

Dinner

Friday, March 13, 1992

9:00 a.m.

Welcome and Statement of Purpose for Day Two—Bill Wulf Recap of Brainstorming Session—Alastair Cameron and Bruce Schatz

9:30 a.m.

How do we get there from here?

 

• What must be done to realize collaboratories in molecular biology in the near term?

 

• What specific proposals might be made?

 

• What tools do molecular biologists use that could be shared with scientists of other disciplines?

 

• How can the needs of molecular biologists be leveraged with the needs of other scientists to establish collaboratories? What other scientific communities might be targeted?

10:45 a.m.

Break

11:00 a.m.

What are the unsolved problems?

 

• What will they keep us from achieving?

 

• What must be done in the long term to address these problems?

12:30 p.m.

Working Lunch

1:30 p.m.

Conclusions and Report Planning

2:30 p.m.

Summary and Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"B WORKSHOP PROGRAMS AND PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1993. National Collaboratories: Applying Information Technology for Scientific Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2109.
×
Participants

Douglas Brutlag, Stanford University School of Medicine

Alastair Cameron, Harvard College

David J. Galas, Department of Energy

Nat Goodman, Whitehead Institute

Steven Hilgartner, Columbia University

Tim Hunkapiller, California Institute of Technology

David Kingsbury, George Washington University Medical Center

Jim Ostell, National Library of Medicine

Ross Overbeek, Argonne National Laboratory

Robert Robbins, Johns Hopkins University

Laurence Rosenberg, National Science Foundation

Brace Schatz, University of Arizona

Cassandra Smith, University of California, Berkeley

Gio Wiederhold, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency

John Wooley, National Science Foundation

Suggested Citation:"B WORKSHOP PROGRAMS AND PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1993. National Collaboratories: Applying Information Technology for Scientific Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2109.
×

OCEANOGRAPHY WORKSHOP

Program

Thursday, April 23, 1992

8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

8:30 a.m.

Welcome and Introduction—Vint Cerf and Tom Dickey

 

• Background of the collaboratory concept—Need to leverage limited human, financial, and time resources and enable collaboration among scientists

 

• Workshop goals

 

• New ideas for collaboration and the technology that will facilitate collaboration

 

• Priorities and agenda for development of collaboratories

 

• Introductions and personal statements about perspectives on collaboration

9:00 a.m.

Current Working Collaboratories

 

• Modeling Systems in Oceanography—Lew Rothstein

 

• Informal Community Systems in Molecular Biology—Bruce Schatz

10:00 a.m.

Break

10:15 a.m.

Oceanography and Computing: Needs and Desires of Oceanographic Modelers Discussion—Vint Cerf

 

• What are the needs of the modeling community with respect to the technology?

 

• What technology is desirable and why?

 

• How will the community be enabled through increased connectivity and/or additional computer resources?

 

• What are some possible pilot projects?

12:15 p.m.

Working Lunch with Demonstrations of Oceanographic Modeling Systems and Informal Community Systems

1:15 p.m.

Obtaining Access to Field Data: Lessons From Current Practice (10-minute presentations with discussion)

 

• Identifying the Needs—Tom Dickey

 

• Near-Real-Time Data Acquisition: The Atlas Moorings Pilot—Ants Leetmaa and Mike McPhaden

 

• High-Frequency Telemetry Solutions—Mel Briscoe

 

• Sierracom—Phil Walker

 

• Ship-to-Land Communication—Andy Maffei

2:15 p.m.

Break

3:00 p.m.

Day-to-Day Collaboration Among Oceanographers: Problems and Solutions (10-minute presentations with discussion)

 

• Multidisciplinary Collaboration—Peter Wiebe

 

• Omnet and SCIENCEnet—Bob Heinmiller

Suggested Citation:"B WORKSHOP PROGRAMS AND PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1993. National Collaboratories: Applying Information Technology for Scientific Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2109.
×

4:00 p.m.

Impediments to Collaboration—Discussion

 

• Access to data

 

• Cultural limitations

 

• Geographic and physical limitations

 

• Perceived value of technology to the oceanography community

 

• User readiness and acceptance of the technology

 

• Training/support for computational oceanography

 

• Lack of institutional and information infrastructure such as laboratories and equipment

5:00 p.m.

Reception

6:00 p.m.

Dinner

Friday, April 24, 1992

8:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast

8:30 a.m.

Statement of Purpose for Day Two and Recap of Thursday's Discussions—Vint Cerf

9:00 a.m.

Brainstorming

 

• How might collaboration aid oceanography?

 

• What existing problems in oceanography might collaboratories solve or ameliorate?

 

• Given sufficient funding, what would you want to build?

 

• Which communities are the most likely to be initial candidates for collaboratories?

 

• How will these collaboratories benefit the scientists who use them?

10:30 a.m.

Break

10:45 a.m.

How do we get there from here?

 

• What must be done to realize collaboratories in oceanography in the near term?

 

• What specific proposals might be made?

 

• What tools do oceanographers use that could be shared with scientists of other disciplines?

 

• How can the needs of oceanographers be leveraged with the needs of other scientists to establish collaboratories? What other scientific communities might be targeted?

12:30 p.m.

Working Lunch

1:30 p.m.

What are the unsolved problems?

 

• What will they keep us from achieving?

 

• What must be done in the long term to address these problems?

2:30 p.m.

Conclusions and Report Planning

3:30 p.m.

Adjourn

Suggested Citation:"B WORKSHOP PROGRAMS AND PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1993. National Collaboratories: Applying Information Technology for Scientific Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2109.
×
Participants

Jim Baker, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Inc.

Melbourne Briscoe, Office of Naval Research

Vint Cerf, Corporation for National Research Initiatives

Alan Davis, Florida State University

Tom Dickey, University of Southern California

David Evans, Office of Naval Research

Robert Heinmiller, Omnet Inc.

Ellen S. Kappel, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Inc.

Gary Koob, Office of Naval Research

Richard Lambert, National Science Foundation

Ants Leetmaa, NOAA Climate Analysis Center

Andrew Maffei, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Mike McPhaden, NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory

Rebecca G. Moser, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Inc.

Lew Rothstein, University of Rhode Island

Bruce Schatz, University of Arizona

Philip Walker, Sierracom

Peter Wiebe, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Stan Wilson, NOAA National Ocean Service

Suggested Citation:"B WORKSHOP PROGRAMS AND PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1993. National Collaboratories: Applying Information Technology for Scientific Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2109.
×

SPACE PHYSICS WORKSHOP

Program

Thursday, July 9, 1992

8:00 a.m.

Breakfast

8:30 a.m.

Welcome and Introduction—Vint Cerf and C.T. Russell

 

• Background of the Collaboratory Concept—Need to leverage limited human, financial, and time resources and enable collaboration among scientists

 

• Workshop Goals

 

• New ideas for collaboration and the technology that will facilitate collaboration

 

• Priorities and agenda for development of collaboratories

 

• Introductions and Personal Statements About Perspectives on Collaboration

9:00 a.m.

Early Collaborations

 

• Space Physics Analysis Network: The Early Years—Jim Green

 

• Coordinated Data Analysis Workshops—Dan Baker

 

• Atmospheric Explorer/Dynamics Explorer Data System—Dave Winningham

10:00 a.m.

Break

10:15 a.m.

Recent Collaborative Efforts

 

• Cometary Studies on Giotto—Marcia Neugebauer

 

• Magnetospheric Studies on AMPTE—Steve Fuselier

 

• Remote Operation of Instrumentation—John Kelly

12:00 noon

Lunch

1:00 p.m.

Future Collaborative Efforts

 

• Geospace Environment Modeling Program—Tim Eastman

 

• Space Physics Data System—Dave Winningham

 

• International Solar-Terrestrial Program Mission—Dan Baker

2:00 p.m.

Access to Data

 

• Policy on the Access to Publicly Funded Data—Jim Willett

 

• State of the NSSDC Archives Master Directory—Jim Green

 

• Experiences of a Scientist—Bob McPherron

3:00 p.m.

Break

3:15 p.m.

Electronic Networks in Collaborative Studies

 

• Numerical simulations

 

• Theoretical studies

 

• Experimental studies

4:15 p.m.

Discussions of Impediments to Collaboration—All

Suggested Citation:"B WORKSHOP PROGRAMS AND PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1993. National Collaboratories: Applying Information Technology for Scientific Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2109.
×

5:00 p.m.

Reception

6:00 p.m.

Dinner

Friday, July 10, 1992

8:00 a.m.

Breakfast

8:30 a.m.

Statement of Purpose for Day Two and Recap of Day One—Vint Cerf

9:00 a.m.

Brainstorming on Contents of Reportble''>

 

• How might collaboration aid space physics?

 

• What existing problems in space physics might collaboratories solve or ameliorate?

 

• Given sufficient funding, what would you want to build?

 

• Which communities are the most likely to be initial candidates for collaboratories?

 

• How will these collaboratories benefit the scientists who use them?

10:30 a.m.

Break

10:45 a.m.

How do we establish the needed infrastructure?

 

• What must be done to realize collaboratories in space physics in the near term?

 

• What specific proposals might be made?

 

• What tools do space physicists use that could be shared with scientists of other disciplines?

 

• How can the needs of space physicists be leveraged with the needs of other scientists to establish collaboratories? What other scientific communities might be targeted?

12:00 noon

Lunch

1:00 p.m.

What are the unsolved problems?

 

• What will they keep us from achieving?

 

• What must be done in the long term to address these problems?

2:30 p.m.

Conclusions and Report Planning

3:30 p.m.

Adjourn

3:30-5:00 p.m.

Executive Committee Meeting

Participants

Daniel Atkins, University of Michigan

Daniel Baker, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, National Space Science Data Center

Joseph Bredekamp, NASA Headquarters

Vint Cerf, Corporation for National Research Initiatives

Suggested Citation:"B WORKSHOP PROGRAMS AND PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1993. National Collaboratories: Applying Information Technology for Scientific Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2109.
×

Timothy Eastman, National Science Foundation

Steve Fuselier, Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory

James Green, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, National Space Science Data Center

John D. Kelly, Stanford Research Institute International

William Kurth, University of Iowa

Barry M. Leiner, Universities Space Research Association

Janet G. Luhmann, University of California, Los Angeles

Robert L. McPherron, University of California, Los Angeles

Marcia Neugebauer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory

C.T. Russell, University of California, Los Angeles

James Willett, NASA Headquarters

John D. Winningham, Southwest Research Institute

Suggested Citation:"B WORKSHOP PROGRAMS AND PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1993. National Collaboratories: Applying Information Technology for Scientific Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2109.
×
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Suggested Citation:"B WORKSHOP PROGRAMS AND PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1993. National Collaboratories: Applying Information Technology for Scientific Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2109.
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Suggested Citation:"B WORKSHOP PROGRAMS AND PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1993. National Collaboratories: Applying Information Technology for Scientific Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2109.
×
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Suggested Citation:"B WORKSHOP PROGRAMS AND PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1993. National Collaboratories: Applying Information Technology for Scientific Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2109.
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×
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Suggested Citation:"B WORKSHOP PROGRAMS AND PARTICIPANTS." National Research Council. 1993. National Collaboratories: Applying Information Technology for Scientific Research. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/2109.
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Computing and communications are becoming essential tools of science. Together, they make possible new kinds and degrees of collaboration. This book addresses technical, scientific, and social aspects of fostering scientific collaboration using information technology. It explores issues in molecular biology, oceanography, and space physics, and derives recommendations for a partnership between scientists and technologists to develop better collaboration technology to support science.

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