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Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary (2015)

Chapter: Appendix B: Workshop Agenda

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Workshop Agenda." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21697.
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B Workshop Agenda Defining the Expertise Needed for the 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce: A Workshop October 28–29, 2014 Institute of Medicine 500 Fifth Street NW, Room 100 Washington, DC Background: From its very beginnings, neuroscience has been fundamentally interdis- ciplinary. As a result of rapid technological advance and the advent of large collaborative projects, however, neuroscience is expanding well beyond traditional subdisciplines and intellectual boundaries to include expertise from many other fields, such as engineering, computer science, and applied mathematics. Revolutionary tools are quickly becoming in- corporated into the work of many labs. However, the importance and rapid proliferation of mission-critical technologies raises important ques- tions on how to train the next generation of neuroscientists, not only to use particular tools, but to be prepared for a changing technological land- scape. In addition, the advent of new types of data and the growing im- portance of large datasets raise additional questions about how to train the next generation in approaches to data sharing and proper analysis. These concerns dovetail with the need to teach improved scientific prac- tices ranging from experimental design (powering of studies, appropriate blinding) to greater sophistication in statistics. As important is the in- creasing need for investigators who are able to bridge the translational 73

74 DEVELOPING A 21st CENTURY NEUROSCIENCE WORKFORCE gap between basic and clinical neuroscience. Given the changing land- scape resulting from technological advance and the growing importance of interdisciplinary and collaborative science, the goal of this workshop is to explore future diverse workforce needs and consider the changing needs of training programs. Meeting Objectives: • Explore future workforce needs in light of new and emerging tools, technologies, and techniques o Consider what new subdisciplines and/or collaborations with other fields might be needed moving forward o Describe opportunities and challenges for cross-training of neuroscience research programs with other areas (e.g., engi- neering, computer science, mathematics, physical sciences) and across research environments (e.g., academia, industry) • Identify current components of graduate training programs that could be leveraged and new components that could be developed that might lead to o greater interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches, o ehanced data handling and analysis capabilities, o increased scientific accuracy and reproducibility, o improved understanding of translational research, and o enhanced awareness of ethical research practices. • Examine roles of training program funders (e.g., government, fellowships), administrators, mentors, and mentees in developing and executing revised training programs to meet the needs out- lined above. • Consider mechanisms for updating researcher competencies at multiple levels (e.g., postdoctoral, independent investigators) to meet the needs outlined above.

APPENDIX B 75 DAY ONE 12:30 p.m. Opening Remarks HUDA AKIL, Co-Chair Professor of Neurosciences Department of Psychiatry University of Michigan STEVIN ZORN, Co-Chair Executive Vice President Neuroscience Research Lundbeck Research USA 12:35 p.m. Challenges for the Next Generation of Scientists STORY LANDIS Former Director National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke 12:55 p.m. The Changing Neuroscience Research Landscape: Opportunities and Challenges EVE MARDER Professor of Biology Brandeis University 1:15 p.m. Imagining the Future Neuroscience Workforce CAROL MASON Professor Department of Pathology and Cell Biology Columbia University 1:35 p.m. Discussion with Speakers and Participants • What key workforce characteristics would best posi- tion the field to address emerging opportunities and challenges in neuroscience research?

76 DEVELOPING A 21st CENTURY NEUROSCIENCE WORKFORCE SESSION I: BASIC SCIENTIFIC PRINCIPLES AND FUNDAMENTAL KNOWLEDGE Session Objectives: Identify current gaps in expertise necessary to ad- vance fundamental knowledge and basic neuroscience research. Explore the impact of integrating additional disciplines into the basic neurosci- ence research enterprise. Examine innovative programs addressing these gaps. Consider potential strategies for creating and/or updating training of both current and future researchers. Session Moderator: KATJA BROSE Editor Neuron 1:55 p.m. Defining the Gap in Neuroscience Expertise Around Basic Scientific Principles and Fundamental Knowledge JOAN FERRINI-MUNDY Assistant Director Directorate for Education & Human Resources National Science Foundation 2:15 p.m. Addressing the Gaps Through Cross-Training and Collaboration • How could disciplines outside the neurosciences help address this gap? • Which disciplines would provide the greatest value- add? TERRY SEJNOWSKI Professor Computational Neurobiology Laboratory Salk Institute for Biological Studies 2:35 p.m. Program Example • On what gaps in knowledge has the program fo- cused? How were these gaps determined? • What challenges and opportunities have emerged during development and execution of the program?

APPENDIX B 77 DARCY KELLEY Professor Biological Sciences Columbia University 2:55 p.m. Discussion with Speakers, Panelists, and Participants • How could programs be designed to enhance the abilities of current and future researchers to meet the challenges and develop an inter- and multidiscipli- nary research enterprise? o What are priority components of such programs? • How could enhanced awareness of ethical research practices be incorporated into current programs? 3:20 p.m. BREAK SESSION II: DATA HANDLING AND ANALYSIS Session Objectives: Identify current gaps in expertise necessary to ad- vance the ability to handle and analyze data. Explore the impact of inte- grating additional disciplines into the basic neuroscience research enterprise. Examine innovative programs addressing these gaps. Consid- er potential strategies for creating and/or updating training of both cur- rent and future researchers. Session Moderator: RICHARD MOHS Vice President Neuroscience Clinical Development Eli Lilly and Company 3:30 p.m. Defining the Gap in Neuroscience Expertise Around Data Handling and Analysis Knowledge MARYANN MARTONE Co-Director National Center for Microscopy and Imaging Research University of California, San Diego

78 DEVELOPING A 21st CENTURY NEUROSCIENCE WORKFORCE 3:50 p.m. Addressing the Gaps Through Cross-Training and Collaboration • How could disciplines outside the neurosciences help address this gap? • Which disciplines would provide the greatest value-add? BRIAN LITT Director Penn Center for Neuroengineering and Therapeutics University of Pennsylvania 4:10 p.m. Program Example • On what gaps in knowledge has the program focused? How were these gaps determined? • What challenges and opportunities have emerged during development and execution of the program? MICHAEL SPRINGER Assistant Professor of Systems Biology Department of Systems Biology Harvard Medical School 4:30 p.m. Discussion with Speakers, Panelists, and Participants • How could enhanced teaching of statistical methods bolster research? • How could programs be designed to enhance the abilities of current and future researchers to meet the challenges and develop an inter- and multidisciplinary research enterprise? o What are priority components of such programs? SESSION III: TRANSLATIONAL SCIENCE Session Objectives: Identify current gaps in neuroscience expertise around translational science. Explore the impact of greater understanding and knowledge in furthering innovative therapeutic development. Exam- ine current programs focused on improving translational neuroscience research. Consider potential strategies for creating and/or updating train- ing of both current and future researchers.

APPENDIX B 79 Session Moderator: ATUL PANDE President Verity BioConsulting 4:55 p.m. Defining the Gap in Expertise Around Translational Science Knowledge FRANK YOCCA Vice President Neuroscience iMed AstraZeneca Neuroscience 5:15 p.m. Addressing the Gaps Through Cross-Training and Collaboration • How could disciplines outside the neurosciences help address this gap? • Which disciplines would provide the greatest value-add? HOWARD FEDEROFF Executive Dean School of Medicine Georgetown University 5:35 p.m. Program Example • What challenges and opportunities have emerged during development and execution of the program? ANTHONY RICCI Edward C. and Amy H. Sewall Professor Stanford School of Medicine 5:55 p.m. Discussion with Speakers, Panelists, and Participants • What fields outside the sciences (e.g., regulatory) might also be included in programs designed around developing translational neuroscientists? • How could programs be designed to enhance the abil- ities of current and future researchers to meet the challenges and develop an inter- and multidisciplinary research enterprise? o What are priority components of such programs?

80 DEVELOPING A 21st CENTURY NEUROSCIENCE WORKFORCE 6:15 p.m. Day One Wrap-Up and ADJOURN HUDA AKIL, Co-Chair STEVIN ZORN, Co-Chair DAY TWO 8:30 a.m. Opening Remarks HUDA AKIL, Co-Chair STEVIN ZORN, Co-Chair SESSION IV: EXPERIMENTAL RIGOR AND QUANTITATIVE SKILLS Session Objectives: Identify current gaps in neuroscience expertise to improve experimental rigor and quantitative skills. Explore the impact of greater expertise in this area on the neuroscience research enterprise. Ex- amine innovative programs addressing these gaps. Consider potential strategies for creating and/or updating training for both current and future researchers. Session Moderator: RICHARD BORN Professor Department of Neurobiology Harvard Medical School 8:40 a.m. Defining the Gap in Expertise Around Experimental Rigor and Quantitative Skills • Are there challenges in these areas specifically relat- ed to neuroscience research? EMERY BROWN Professor of Computational Neuroscience Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences Massachusetts Institute of Technology

APPENDIX B 81 8:55 a.m. Addressing the Gaps Through Cross-Training and Collaboration • How could disciplines outside the neurosciences help address this gap? • Which disciplines would provide the greatest value- add? MARK COHEN Professor Department of Bioengineering University of California, Los Angeles 9:15 a.m. Program Example • What challenges and opportunities have emerged during development and execution of the program? JAMES BARRETT Professor and Chair Department of Pharmacology and Physiology College of Medicine, Drexel University 9:35 a.m. Discussion with Speakers and Participants • Which quantitative tools might provide the most benefit? • How could greater skills in these areas improve the reproducibility of scientific results? • How could programs be designed to enhance the abilities of current and future researchers to meet the challenges and develop an inter- and multidiscipli- nary research enterprise? o What are priority components of such programs? 10:00 a.m. BREAK SESSION V: EMERGING TOOLS, TECHNOLOGIES, AND TECHNIQUES Session Objectives: Explore challenges and opportunities for integrating emerging tools, technologies, and techniques into current neuroscience research practice. Examine innovative programs training neuroscience

82 DEVELOPING A 21st CENTURY NEUROSCIENCE WORKFORCE researchers to use and incorporate new and emerging tools, technologies, and techniques into current research programs. Consider potential strate- gies for developing a neuroscience research enterprise that seamlessly disseminates and incorporates new and innovative tools, technologies, and techniques. Session Moderator: JOHN MORRISON Professor Department of Neuroscience Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai 10:15 a.m. Challenges and Opportunities in Neuroscience Research for Real-Time Integration of Emerging Tools, Technol- ogies, and Techniques DOUGLAS WEBER Program Manager Biological Technologies Office Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency 10:35 a.m. Mechanisms for Integrating Emerging Tools, Technolo- gies, and Techniques • How are emerging and new tools, technologies, and techniques being integrating in real-time into re- search programs? MARIE-FRANCOISE CHESSELET Charles H. Markham Professor of Neurology Reed Neurological Research Center University of California, Los Angeles 10:55 a.m. Discussion with Speakers, Panelists, and Participants • What skills might provide the greatest benefit to re- searchers when preparing to integrate new tools, technologies, and techniques into research programs? • Is there an opportunity related to the BRAIN Initiative?

APPENDIX B 83 • How could programs be designed for both current and future researchers to meet the challenges and develop an inter- and multidisciplinary research en- terprise? SESSION VI: DEVELOPING A DIVERSE NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH ENTERPRISE THROUGH COLLABORATION Session Objectives: Explore challenges and opportunities associated with developing a diverse neuroscience research enterprise with greater incor- poration of collaborative science approaches. Consider the role of cross- disciplinary training of future scientists in increasing collaborative and innovative science. Session Moderator: WALTER KOROSHETZ Acting Director National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke 11:30 a.m. Challenges and Opportunities in Neuroscience Research for Collaborative and Diverse Science DENNIS CHOI Director Neurosciences Institute Stony Brook University 11:50 a.m. What role can the Big Data Projects (BRAIN, Human Brain Project, Allen Institute) play in developing new opportunities to enhance cross-disciplinary training, and boost the likelihood and ease of future novel collabora- tions in neuroscience? JANE ROSKAMS Executive Director, Strategy and Alliances Allen Institute for Brain Science 12:10 p.m. LUNCH

84 DEVELOPING A 21st CENTURY NEUROSCIENCE WORKFORCE 1:10 p.m. Increasing Innovative Neuroscience Research Through Collaboration • How has the collaboration(s) advanced innovative science? • What challenges and opportunities have emerged during development of the collaboration? DAVID LOPES CARDOZO Associate Dean for Graduate Studies Director, Division of Medical Sciences Harvard Medical School 1:30 p.m. Discussion with Speakers, Panelists, and Participants • What are potential mechanisms for training? o Can collaboration be taught? • What impact would concerns about career develop- ment have on encouraging collaborative research? • How could programs be designed to enhance the abilities of current and future researchers to meet the challenges and develop an inter- and multidiscipli- nary research enterprise? 1:55 p.m. BREAK SESSION VII: DEVELOPING AND EXECUTING REVISED TRAINING PROGRAMS Session Objectives: Examine the roles of neuroscience training program funders, administrators, mentors, and mentees in developing and execut- ing revised training programs focused on diverse expertise in the areas identified in previous sessions. Consider specific challenges and oppor- tunities related to the potential training program components outlined. Session Moderator: NANCY DESMOND Associate Director Division of Neuroscience and Basic Behavioral Science National Institute of Mental Health

APPENDIX B 85 2:10 p.m. Developing and Executing New Neuroscience Training Programs OSWALD STEWARD Director, Reeve-Irvine Research Center Senior Associate Dean for Research University of California Irvine School of Medicine 2:30 p.m. Perspectives and Panel Discussion: Integrating New Training Components • Given the potential new expertise identified, de- scribe current and potential mechanisms for integra- tion. Consider potential challenges for integration. • Consider how training programs could be different for future researchers vs. current investigators (e.g., postdoctoral fellows, principal investigators) • Explore new and/or alternative training mechanisms that might facilitate training (e.g., online courses) • Discuss additional skills that might be critical for re- searchers to possess (e.g., critical thinking, manage- ment, administrative, communication) Training Program Funder THOMAS INSEL Director National Institute of Mental Health Department Administrator RICHARD TSIEN Druckenmiller Professor of Neuroscience Director, Neuroscience Institute Chair, Department of Physiology and Neuroscience New York University Langone Medical Center

86 DEVELOPING A 21st CENTURY NEUROSCIENCE WORKFORCE Mentor INDIRA RAMAN Professor Department of Neurobiology and Physiology Northwestern University 3:15 p.m. Mentor and Mentee Response Panel • What are the potential challenges and opportunities for integration of new topics into current and future training programs? DIANE LIPSCOMBE Professor of Neuroscience Center for Neurobiology of Cells and Circuits Brown University KATHERINE PRATER Graduate Student University of Michigan SOFIA JURGENSEN Postdoctoral Researcher Laboratory of Pablo E. Castillo Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience Albert Einstein College of Medicine MARGUERITE MATTHEWS Postdoctoral Fellow Department of Behavioral Neuroscience Oregon Health & Science University 4:00 p.m. Discussion with Speakers, Panelists, and Participants

APPENDIX B 87 SESSION VIII: NEXT STEPS FOR NEUROSCIENCE RESARCH Session Objectives: Explore priority areas for updating the knowledge and expertise of current and future scientists in an effort to address future neuroscience workforce needs. Identify tangible next steps for develop- ing and integrating new concepts and expertise into current and future training programs. Discuss the role of funders, administrators, mentors, and mentees in this process. 4:50 p.m. Panel Discussion Session Moderators 5:30 p.m. Final Comments HUDA AKIL, Co-Chair STEVIN ZORN, Co-Chair 5:45 p.m. ADJOURN

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From its very beginning, neuroscience has been fundamentally interdisciplinary. As a result of rapid technological advances and the advent of large collaborative projects, however, neuroscience is expanding well beyond traditional subdisciplines and intellectual boundaries to rely on expertise from many other fields, such as engineering, computer science, and applied mathematics. This raises important questions about to how to develop and train the next generation of neuroscientists to ensure innovation in research and technology in the neurosciences. In addition, the advent of new types of data and the growing importance of large datasets raise additional questions about how to train students in approaches to data analysis and sharing. These concerns dovetail with the need to teach improved scientific practices ranging from experimental design (e.g., powering of studies and appropriate blinding) to improved sophistication in statistics. Of equal importance is the increasing need not only for basic researchers and teams that will develop the next generation of tools, but also for investigators who are able to bridge the translational gap between basic and clinical neuroscience.

Developing a 21st Century Neuroscience Workforce is the summary of a workshop convened by the Institute of Medicine's Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders on October 28 and 29,2014, in Washington, DC, to explore future workforce needs and how these needs should inform training programs. Workshop participants considered what new subdisciplines and collaborations might be needed, including an examination of opportunities for cross-training of neuroscience research programs with other areas. In addition, current and new components of training programs were discussed to identify methods for enhancing data handling and analysis capabilities, increasing scientific accuracy, and improving research practices. This report highlights the presentation and discussion of the workshop.

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